Job: associate professor Roman History, Carleton

I can definitely encourage colleagues to apply for this tenure track position in Roman History. Carleton University in Ottawa is a lovely and inspiring place to work. I had the opportunity to be a visiting researcher there and it was a total success (we made a boardgame!!!). You will have the opportunity to work with fantastic colleagues such as Laura Banducci and Shawn Graham, what more do you want?

 

Field of Specialization: Greek and Roman Studies: Roman History
Academic Unit: Humanities
Category of Appointment: Preliminary (Tenure-Track)
Rank/Position Title: Assistant Professor
Start Date: July 1, 2020
Closing Date: Applications will be considered until the position is filled

About the Position:

The Greek and Roman Studies program at Carleton University invites applications for a preliminary (tenure-track) appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor in Roman History, to begin July 1, 2020.

About the Academic Unit:

Greek and Roman Studies is housed in the College of the Humanities together with the Bachelor of Humanities program and the program in Religion. GRS offers a B.A. and minors in Greek and Roman Studies and Archaeology. The program is home to four faculty members and 55 majors. For more information on the program and the College, please see www.carleton.ca/chum/.

Qualifications:

We seek an outstanding scholar with a PhD in Classics and demonstrable excellence in teaching. The hire will have a track record of high-quality scholarly research leading to peer-reviewed publications. Teaching responsibilities will include Roman history, Latin, introductory classes and upper-year seminars. The appointee will also have the opportunity to develop an advanced topics course in an area of expertise. Ability to teach Greek language courses is also an asset.

Application Instructions:

A letter of application, a CV, a statement of teaching philosophy, a research statement, and a writing sample should be sent electronically as one single PDF file by November 30, 2019 to Dr. Shane Hawkins, Director of the College of the Humanities, at shane.hawkins@carleton.ca. In addition, candidates should arrange for three letters of reference to be sent under separate cover. Preliminary interviews will be held via Skype.

Please indicate in your application if you are a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada.

About Carleton University:

Carleton University is a dynamic and innovative research and teaching institution with a national and international reputation as a leader in collaborative teaching and learning, research and governance. With over 30,000 students in more than 100 programs of study, we encourage creative risk-taking, discovery, and the generation of transformative knowledge. We are proud to be one of the most accessible campuses in North America. Carleton’s Paul Menton Centre for Students with Disabilities has been heralded as the gold standard for disability support services in Canada.

Carleton’s location in Ottawa, Ontario provides many opportunities for scholarship and research with numerous and diverse groups and institutions. Canada’s capital has a population of almost one million and reflects the country’s bilingual and multicultural character. To learn more about our university and the City of Ottawa, please visit www.carleton.ca/about.

Carleton University is committed to fostering diversity within its community as a source of excellence, cultural enrichment, and social strength. We welcome those who would contribute to the further diversification of our university including, but not limited to: women; visible minorities; First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples; persons with disabilities; and persons of any sexual orientation, gender identity and/or expression. Carleton understands that career paths vary.  Legitimate career interruptions will in no way prejudice the assessment process and their impact will be carefully considered.

Applicants selected for an interview are asked to contact the Chair as soon as possible to discuss any accommodation requirements. Arrangements will be made in a timely manner.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. All positions are subject to budgetary approval.

Funding training school digital scholarship, Cologne

Want to learn a wide range of computational approaches for your archaeological, historical or heritage work? Consider applying to our ARKWORK COST action 4-day training school. Full funding will be offered to successful applicants. I will be teaching network research at the event.
When? 4-7 February 2020
Where? Cologne
Deadline? 15 November 2019
Please find below a call for Trainees for a 4day training School on Methods of Digital Scholarship, organised in Cologne, 4-7 February 2020. Researchers at different ranks are eligible to apply to the training school, including graduate and PhD students, postdoctoral researchers and professionals. Researchers from any branch of archaeology, as well as information science, archival science, informatics, computer science, culture studies, anthropology, sociology of knowledge, and other disciplines are welcome to apply, provided that they have an interest in archaeological practices and knowledge work in the digital environment.

Theme: Methods of Digital Scholarship
Date & Location: Cologne, Germany, 4-7 February 2020 (4 days)
Local Host: Institute of Archaeology, University of Cologne, http://archaeologie.uni-koeln.de/31254.html
Venue: Cologne Digital Archaeology Laboratory, CoDArchLab, Institute of Archaeology, Kerpener Straße 30, 50931, Cologne (entrance from Weyertal St.)

About this Training School

The training school will acquaint participants with state-of-the-art methods and tools for digital scholarship. You will learn through lectures, practical classes, group work and discussion workshops how digital technologies facilitate, enhance and change scholarly practices and knowledge production. You will become familiar with established and emerging methods for data modelling, data mining and text analytics and you will get hands-on experience in working with linked open data, digital tools for reproducible research and platforms for sharing research and teaching resources. Furthermore, you will learn how to use network analysis, social media and virtual ethnography to advance your scholarly work and will reflect upon ethical and legal issues in digital research.

Learning outcomes:
By the end of the training school, you will:
• understand the benefits and challenges in using different methods and tools for digital scholarship
• evaluate and use a variety of appropriate models and methods for data modelling, data mining and text analytics
• identify, select and use appropriate platforms for sharing research and teaching resources
• use digital tools and methods to extract, analyse, present and interpret information for the production of scholarly knowledge
• recognize the advantages of reproducible research and take advantage of currently available methods for performing and publishing data analyses in a reproducible manner
• critically reflect upon the legal and ethical issues of digital research

Practical details:
The duration of this Training School is four working days. A Grant of 700 EUR will be provided for accepted participants (450 EUR for those coming from Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg; 550 EUR for those coming from Austria, France, Switzerland and the Czech Republic) as a contribution to the travelling costs, accommodation (5-days) and subsistence during the Training School. If participants, for any reason, are unable to attend all four days of the school, the grant will be reduced accordingly. There are no registration fees.

Organised by ARKWORK (https://www.arkwork.eu)
This COST-Action (https://www.cost.eu/actions/CA15201) brings together the multidisciplinary work of researchers of archaeological practices in the field of
archaeological knowledge production and use. The aim of the network is to make a major push forward in the current state-of-the-art in knowing how archaeological knowledge in a digital environment is produced, how it is used and how to maximise its positive impact on society. The focus of ARKWORK is on training the next generation of scholars and stakeholders by involving future leaders of research as well as high profile experts employed by the industry and public organisations.

Eligibility
Those who work/attend an education programme, or have citizenship/residency in the following states:

COST Full Members: Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus,
Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Montenegro, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom and the Republic of North Macedonia.

COST Near Neighbour Countries: Albania, Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Egypt, Georgia, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Moldova, Morocco, the Palestinian Authority, Russia, Syria, Tunisia, and Ukraine.

European RTD Organisations: European Organisation for Nuclear Research, European Fusion Development Agreement, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Space Agency, European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, European XFEL Free-Electron Laser Facility, Institut Laue Langevin.

Applicants to the training school asking for funding should submit:
1. A motivation letter, not exceeding 300-500 words. This must include a clear indication of experience relevant to the topic of the training school; provide a rationale of why you are interested in the training school and how you envisage the training school contributing to your learning and research objectives.
2. A short CV (2 pages max)
3. An indication of whether you would like to be considered for funding
Please send your application to: Sebastian Hageneuer, s.hageneuer@uni-koeln.de
For questions, please write to: Prof. Dr. Eleftheria Paliou, e.paliou@uni-koeln.de
The applicants will be informed about the result of their application via Email by November 29th. Applicants that will not receive a grant, but do receive an invitation can participate with their own or their institute’s funding.

Closing date for applications: 15th November, 2020

Event: digital approaches to research, Aarhus 30 October

Aarhus University in Denmark has recently seen the creation of a Centre for Digital History and the SDAM group (Social Dynamics in the Ancient Mediterranean, with loads of interest in networks). These initiatives are the driving forces behind the first in what I feel might be a series of international activities we can expect from them on the topic of digital approach in the humanities and social sciences.

Check out the program pasted below and register here!

When? 30 October 2019

Where? Aarhus University

Digital Approaches to Research in Humanities and Social Sciences 

30 October 2019, Aarhus University, building 1485, room 226

Session 1 – “Research standards and collaboration” 9:15 – 9:30 Icebreaker activity

9:30 – 9:55 Trust but verify: implications of the reproducibility crisis on technology and practice in HASS disciplines

Shawn Ross

9:55 – 10:20 Lessons learned from Data Analysis projects in Natural Language Processing with Japanese and Security Studies data – Shell Scripts, Jupyter Notebooks, and the value of doctests

Brian Ballsun-Stanton

10:20 – 10:45 Epigraphy.info and the Distributed Text Services. Collaboration with standards

Pietro Liuzzo

10:45 – 11:00 – Coffee break

Session 2 – “The realities of digital research”

11:00 – 11:25 Raising the dead; technical implications

Katrine Frøkjær Baunvig

11:25 – 11:50 DISSINET experiences and challenges in transforming history into spatial and network data

Tomáš Hampejs, Adam Mertel

11:50 – 12:15 Some challenges to coordinated, collaborative, and cross-cultural ethnographic work

Benjamin Purzycki

12:15 – 12:40 Social media data triangulation – The Danish HPV controversy as an example Marie

Louise Tørring

12:40 – 13:30 – Lunch

Session 3 – “Social Dynamics in the Ancient Mediterranean research group showcase”

13:30 – 13:45 Petrified voices: the evolution of the Graeco-Roman epigraphic production in space and time

Petra Heřmánková

13:45 – 14:00 Social dynamics in the ancient Mediterranean and the cultural evolution of moralizing religions: a text-mining approach

Vojtěch Kaše

14:00 – 14:15 Analysis with graph representation of complex networks in R: the case of Group of Twenty countries

Antonio Rivero Ostoic

14:15 – 14:30 Small data – Big Challenges: the goals and mission of the SDAM project

Adela Sobotkova

14:30 – 15:00 – Coffee break

15:00 – 16:00 “eResearch speed dating!” social activity & un-conference

Linked Pasts 5: back to the (re)sources

Consider submitting a poster to Linked Pasts 5, or host a tutorial! A great series of events.

Call for Participation: Linked Pasts 5: back to the (re)sources

University Bordeaux Montaigne, Institute Ausonius

Bordeaux, 11-13 December 2019

Dear colleagues,

We are very pleased to invite you to contribute to Linked Pasts 5 Conference, which will take place at the University Bordeaux Montaigne, from Wednesday 11 until Friday 13 December 2019.

Linked Pasts is an annual symposium dedicated to facilitating practical and pragmatic developments in Linked Open Data in History, Classics, Geography, and Archaeology. It brings together leading exponents of Linked Data from academia, the Cultural Heritage sector as well as providers of infrastructures and library services to address the obstacles to, and issues raised by, developing a digital ecosystem of projects dedicated to interlinking online resources about the past.

This year’s symposium aims to centre on the questions of sources, understood here both in terms of ancient/‘historical’ sources, and in terms of data (re)source used in digital, LOD-related projects. We would like to focus on how, and why it is important to link back to the sources, as those are where the historical objects we are dealing with originate from. In this perspective, one target identified for this year is the consolidation of data models related to place, people, and historical sources, especially on how to model relationships between instances from these three classes.
This will be addressed through one panel on Places (keynote: Carmen Brando Lebas) and another on People (keynote: Charlotte Roueché), each followed by a breakout session.

The second aim of Linked Pasts 5 is to debate on infrastructures and LOD implementation. This key question will be addressed through a keynote by Gautier Poupeau (Institut national de l’Audiovisuel [INA], France; @lespetitescases), and a round-table gathering actors from national and supra-national infrastructures (Archaeology Data Service, DARIAH, dataforhistory.org and Huma-Num). We hope this will be the opportunity to share the best practices and present to the conference attendees potential solutions for data storing and publication.

The conference will start with a session where you will be able to participate in a hackathon or attend tutorials on LOD theoretical approaches and tools. There also will be a ‘rolling’ hackathon (running in parallel to breakout sessions) named LinkedPipes, which will be dedicated to tools and workflows, with the aim of producing a set of resources for people who want to do LOD.
Last but not least, Linked Pasts 5 will also provide an extensive poster session, followed by a reception.

Website and Complete CfP: https://linkedpasts5.sciencesconf.org/

Where: University Bordeaux Montaigne, France

When: 11-13 December 2019

Organizers: Alberto Dalla Rosa & Vincent Razanajao (Project PATRIMONIUM ERC-StG 716375 – Institute Ausonius – University Bordeaux Montaigne)

Email: linkedpasts5@sciencesconf.org

Linked Pasts 5: back to the (re)sources

Bordeaux, 11-13 December 2019

Description

Linked Pasts is an annual symposium dedicated to facilitating practical and pragmatic developments in Linked Open Data in History, Classics, Geography, and Archaeology. It brings together leading exponents of Linked Data from academia, the Cultural Heritage sector as well as providers of infrastructures and library services to address the obstacles to, and issues raised by, developing a digital ecosystem of projects dedicated to interlinking online resources about the past.

Initiated in 2015 at King’s College London, the second Linked Pasts symposium took place the following year at the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia in Madrid. In 2017 it crossed the sea to the Stanford Humanities Centre and then returned to Europe last year, to the Mainz Centre for Digitality in the Humanities and Cultural Studies (mainzed). This year, Linked Pasts moved to the South-West of France and will take place at the Institute Ausonius, University Bordeaux Montaigne, from 11 to 13 December 2019.

Linked Pasts has given researchers and professionals from diverse backgrounds the opportunity to share ideas, methods, and workflows in the light of their own experiences and expertise — on the one hand interrogating current technical challenges, and on the other, working towards collective approaches to solving them.

Linked Pasts 5: back to the (re)sources

This year’s symposium aims to centre on the questions of sources, understood here both in terms of ancient/‘historical’ sources, and in terms of data (re)source used in digital, LOD-related projects. We would like to focus on how, and why it is important to link back to the sources, as those are where the historical objects we are dealing with originate from. In this perspective, one target identified for this year is the consolidation of data models related to place, people, and historical sources, especially on how to model relationships between instances from these three classes.

This will be addressed through one panel on Places (keynote: Carmen Brando Lebas) and another on People (keynote: Charlotte Roueché), each followed by a breakout session.

The second aim of Linked Pasts 5 is to debate on infrastructures and LOD implementation. This key question will be addressed through a keynote by Gautier Poupeau (Institut national de l’Audiovisuel [INA], France; @lespetitescases), and a round-table gathering actors from national and supra-national infrastructures (Archaeology Data ServiceDARIAHdataforhistory.org and Huma-Num). We hope this will be the opportunity to share the best practices and present to the conference attendees potential solutions for data storing and publication.

Hackathons and tutorials on LOD theoretical approach and tools

We will start the conference with a session where you will be able to participate in a hackathon or attend tutorials on LOD theoretical approaches and tools (see Call for participation below).

There also will be a ‘rolling’ hackathon (running in parallel to breakout sessions) named LinkedPipes, which will be dedicated to tools and workflows, with the aim of producing a set of resources for people who want to do LOD.

Linked Pasts 5 will also provide an extensive poster session (see below), followed by a reception.

Call for Participation

The Linked Pasts 5 welcomes Posters and Tutorials on LOD tools.

Posters

If you would like to present a poster, please submit an abstract (300 words maximum) to the Program Committee by 11:59pm HST 15 October 2019 (https://linkedpasts5.sciencesconf.org/user/submissions; you have to be registered first: https://linkedpasts5.sciencesconf.org/registration). Presenters will be notified of acceptance by 31 November 2019.

Introductive workshops / tutorials

If you would like to give a tutorial on the tool(s) you are developing, please send to linkedpasts5@sciencesconf.org a brief outline with full contact information, presenting your tool and what you intend to cover within a two hour time. Please mention any requirement for technical support.

The deadline for submitting workshops and tutorials is 11:59pm HST, 30 September 2019, with notice of acceptance by 15 October 2019.

Contactlinkedpasts5@sciencesconf.org

Linked Pasts 5 is supported by the Pelagios NetworkERC-StG 716375 PATRIMONIVMInstitut Ausonius, labex LaScArBx and the University Bordeaux Montaigne.

More information can be found at https://linkedpasts5.sciencesconf.org/

Two networks sessions at CAA2020 in Oxford: submit your abstracts!

Can’t wait for CAA 2020 in Oxford! It will be a great event in a great place of course, but also because we will host two network sessions. So if you work on anything even remotely related to archaeology and networks, you will find a good place to present it at one of our sessions. Submit your abstracts!

S32. Archaeological network research 1: spatial and temporal networks

S33. Archaeological network research 2: missing data, cross-disciplinary collaboration and teaching networks

Submit abstracts here

Deadline: 31 October 2019

When? 14–17 April 2020

Where? Oxford

Session abstracts:

S32.  Archaeological network research 1: spatial and temporal networks (Standard)

Convenors:

Philip Verhagen, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Humanities
Tom Brughmans, University of Barcelona
Aline Deicke, Digital Academy, Academy of Sciences and Literature | Mainz
Natasa Djurdjevac Conrad, Zuse Institute Berlin
Grégoire van Havre, Universidade Federal do Piauí
Philip Riris, University College London

Explicitly including spatial or temporal information in network research is something that has come naturally to archaeologists. Our discipline has a long tradition of spatial analysis and of exploring long-term change in datasets and past phenomena. These are two areas where archaeologists did not look towards mathematicians, physicists and sociologists for inspiration, but rather developed original network methods based on a purely archaeological tradition. As such, they are some of the most promising research topics through which archaeologists can make unique contributions to network science.

But recognition of these contributions has still to materialise due to a number of challenges. How can we ensure these archaeology-inspired approaches become known, explored and applied in other disciplines? How precisely do these spatial and temporal archaeological approaches differ from existing network methods? What existing spatial and temporal approaches in archaeology show equal potential for inspiring new network research?

The spatial phenomena archaeologists address in their network research are rather narrow and can be grouped into three broad categories: movement-, visibility-, and interaction-related phenomena. The aim of network techniques in space syntax focus on exploring movement through urban space, whereas least-cost path networks tend to be used on landscape scales. Neither of these approaches have equivalents in network science (Verhagen et al. 2019). Archaeology has a strong tradition in visibility studies and is also pioneering its more diverse use in network research (Brughmans and Brandes 2017). Most visibility network analyses tend to explore theorised visual signalling networks or visual control over cultural and natural features. Most network methods used for exploring interaction potential between past communities or other cultural features belong to either absolute or relative distance approaches: such as maximum distance network, K-nearest neighbours (sometimes referred to as proximal point analysis (PPA)), beta-skeletons, relative neighbourhood network or Gabriel graph. These, however, are derived from computational geometry and have a long tradition in network research and computer science. Moreover, this is a not a field in which archaeologists seem to push the boundaries of network science (with perhaps a few exceptions; Knappett et al. 2008).

There are a few commonalities between the archaeological applications of these movement, visibility and interaction networks. They tend to be network data representations of traditional archaeological research approaches (e.g. viewsheds, least-cost paths, urban settlement structure, community interaction), and they tend to be applied on spatially large scales with the exception of space syntax (inter-island connectivity, landscape archaeology, regional visual signalling systems). How can we diversify spatial archaeological network research? How can we go beyond making network copies of what archaeologists have done before and rather draw on the unique feature of network data (the ability to formally represent dependencies) to develop even more original spatial network techniques? This seems to us like an eminently possible task for archaeologists.

Despite being at the core of archaeological research, the use of temporal (or longitudinal) network data is common but incredibly narrow in archaeological network research. By far the most common application is to consider dating evidence for nodes or edges and to chop up the resulting networks into predefined categories that could have a typological, culture historical or chronological logic (e.g. artefact type A; Roman Republican; 400-300 BC). This process results in subnetworks sometimes referred to as snapshots, the structure of which are explored in chronological order like a filmstrip. A significantly less common approach is to represent processes of network structural change as dynamic network models (e.g. Bentley et al. 2005), or to represent dynamic processes taking place on top of network structures (e.g. Graham 2006).

This research focus of temporal archaeological network research is not at all representative of the diverse and critical ways archaeologists study temporal change. How can the archaeological research tradition inspire new temporal network approaches? How can the use of dynamic network models become more commonly applied? What temporal approaches from network science have archaeologists neglected to adopt? How can, for example, studies modelling the evolution of networks suggest explanations for the levels of complexity observed in past networks?

This session welcomes papers on archaeological network research including but not exclusive to these challenges. We also invite you to present your work on the topics of missing data, cross-disciplinary collaboration and teaching networks in the linked session ‘Archaeological network research 2’.

References

Bentley, R., Lake, M., & Shennan, S. (2005). Specialisation and wealth inequality in a model of a clustered economic network. Journal of Archaeological Science, 32(9), 1346–1356. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2005.03.008

Brughmans, T., & Brandes, U. (2017). Visibility network patterns and methods for studying visual relational phenomena in archaeology. Frontiers in Digital Humanities: Digital Archaeology, 4(17). https://doi.org/doi.org/10.3389/fdigh.2017.00017

Graham, S. (2006). Networks, Agent-Based Models and the Antonine Itineraries: Implications for Roman Archaeology. Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology, 19(1), 45–64. https://doi.org/10.1558/jmea.2006.19.1.45

Knappett, C., Evans, T., & Rivers, R. (2008). Modelling maritime interaction in the Aegean Bronze Age. Antiquity, 82(318), 1009–1024. Retrieved from http://antiquity.ac.uk/Ant/082/1009/ant0821009.pdf

Verhagen, P., Nuninger, L. & Groenhuijzen, M. R. (2019). Modelling of pathways and movement networks in archaeology: an overview of current approaches. In: Verhagen, P., J. Joyce & M.R. Groenhuijzen (eds.) Finding the Limits of the Limes: Modelling Demography, Economy and Transport on the Edge of the Roman Empire. Cham: Springer, p. 217-249. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-04576-0_11

S33.  Archaeological network research 2: missing data, cross-disciplinary collaboration and teaching networks (Standard)

Convenors:

Grégoire van Havre, Universidade Federal do Piauí – Department of Archaeology
Tom Brughmans, University of Barcelona
Aline Deicke, Digital Academy, Academy of Sciences and Literature | Mainz
Natasa Djurdjevac Conrad, Zuse Institute Berlin
Grégoire van Havre, Universidade Federal do Piauí
Philip Riris, University College London
Philip Verhagen, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Humanities

New challenges emerge as network research becomes ever more common in archaeology: can we develop new network methods for dealing with missing archaeological data, how can cross-disciplinary collaborations be leveraged to make original contributions to both archaeology and network science, and how do we teach archaeological network research in the classroom?

Although a range of techniques exist in both archaeology and network science for dealing with missing data and data uncertainty, the fragmentation of the material record presents a challenge – made more explicit through the use of formal methods – that is hard to tackle. Much of the task of identifying network science equivalents of archaeological missing data techniques remains to be done, and there is a real need for identifying how archaeological approaches could lead to the development of new network mathematical and statistical techniques. But by far most pressing is the need to formally express data uncertainty and absence in our archaeological network research.

Like many other aspects of archaeological network research, this challenge should be faced through cross-disciplinary collaboration with mathematicians, statisticians and physicists. Archaeological network research has a great track record of such collaborations, but not all of them have been successful and not all archaeologists find it equally easy to identify collaborators in other disciplines. How can we facilitate the communication between scholars with different disciplinary backgrounds? How can we foster archaeological network research that holds potential contributions to archaeology as well as other disciplines? What events and resources should be developed to provide a platform for cross-disciplinary contact and collaboration?

Now that archaeological network research is slowly becoming recognised as an archaeological subdiscipline in its own right, the topic increasingly finds itself in the curriculum of postgraduate modules and summer schools. But this rapid growth is almost exclusively marked by research and has neglected the development of teaching resources and approaches. What resources are necessary? What lines of argumentation and case studies are particularly powerful for convincing students of the need to see network research as part of our discipline? Which foundations (e.g. data literacy, statistics, and more) have to be laid to facilitate the widespread adoption of formal methods in general into our research processes?

This session welcomes papers on archaeological network research including but not exclusive to these new challenges.  We also invite you to present your work on the topics of spatial and temporal networks in the linked session ‘Archaeological network research 1’.

 

PostDoc research stay ABM and archaeology

The following post might be of interest:

PostDoc research stay (m/f/d) within the Leibniz Post Graduate School: Resources in Societies (ReSoc) – initially limited until 31.05.2020 – an extension until 31.12.2020 is desired, subject to approval by the Leibniz Association

The Ruhr-Universität Bochum is one of the leading research universities. The university draws its strengths from both the diversity and the proximity of scientific and engineering disciplines on a single, coherent campus. This highly dynamic setting enables students and researchers to work across traditional boundaries of academic subjects and faculties.

To strengthen our interdisciplinary and international team, we are looking for a postdoctoral researcher (m/f/d) with either a strong background in social theory in archaeology and/or in agent-based modelling according to the basic research issues of the Project “Resources in Societies” (ReSoc) (https://www.bergbaumuseum.de/de/forschung/projekte/neue-projekte/resoc). The position shall be anchored between the archaeological and the macroeconomic field and bridge both social and economic debates. The candidate (m/f/d) will staff up our team until the end of the project period. The researcher (m/f/d) will be enabled to follow his/her own agenda but it should be in line with the general targets and research conducted under ReSoc. There will also be ample opportunity to collaborate within the ReSoc Team. Furthermore, the researcher will share responsibilities for the final ReSoc Conference in Mai 2020 with the rest of the team.

ReSoc focuses on questions related to resources and their appropriation. ReSoc defines resources as a product of individual appropriation and social construction, as material sources and as mental perceptions.  Our guiding hypothesis is that resources represent an outstanding vehicle to describe social change in human history. Our transdisciplinary approach integrates social and cultural studies, natural sciences and social sciences/economics to explore the transformative potential of resources and their subsequent social impact.

Therefore the Deutsches Bergbau-Museum Bochum (DBM) and the Ruhr-University Bochum (RUB) have established a collaboration to enable PostDocs (m/f/d) to work and teach in a favoring scientific environment.

If the position is funded by third-party funds the employee has no teaching obligation.

Interested applicants should send their application per email to: Prof. Dr. Michael Roos, mak@rub.de, by Friday, 4th October 2019 at the lastest.

Travel expenses for interviews cannot be refunded.

At the Ruhr-Universität Bochum, we wish to promote careers of women in areas in which they are been underrepresented, and we would therefore like to encourage female candidates to send us their applications. Applications by suitable candidates with severe disabilities and other applicants with equal legal status are likewise most welcome.

Anforderungsprofil

  • a Ph.D. degree in Economics/Archaeological Sciences/Social Anthropology
  • extended knowledge and research experience in the field of Economics/Agent-based Modeling/Social Theory in Archaeology
  • excellent English language skills

Online course Agent-based modelling for archaeologists

Want to learn agent-based modelling in depth, in a way that is tailored for archaeologists, but don’t have much time to live and study abroad? Then I can very much recommend this short course at the University of Leiden. It is a paid module but you do get actual credits at the end of it and great private supervision throughout by world-leading experts.

Starting September 2019, the Archaeology Faculty at the University of Leiden, the Netherlands will be offering an online course in Agent-based Modelling for Archaeologists. The course is open to Leiden students and for external participants and will be held entirely online.

The course format follows the SPOC (Small Private Online Course) principles. That is, while fully online the number of participants is limited to 30 and each of them gets personalised attention from the course instructors. The course consists of:

  • short prerecorded video lectures,
  • reading assignments coupled with short quizzes,
  • practical tutorials in programming and model development,
  • online collaborative tasks,
  • other activities, and
  • regular assignments and a large final assignment, which are graded by the instructors.

You can read more about the SPOC format and the previous edition of the course in this paper: https://journal.caa-international.org/articles/10.5334/jcaa.26/

The objective of the course is to provide students with a deep understanding of the possibilities and limitations of modelling and simulation as a tool in archaeology and to teach them the basics of computer programming, enabling them to create new models and simulations for research purposes. At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • identify and translate implicit, conceptual models (scientific hypotheses formulated in natural language) into formal explicit models in a wide range of social and environmental research contexts;
  • build simulation systems to run, test and expand such models following best scientific practice;
  • develop intermediate programming skills with the ability to independently develop and test computer code;
  • interpret simulation results and assess their validity in archaeological and implementation terms;
  • understand the role of simulation techniques in modern scientific practice and appreciate both the potential and the challenges of the method

The course is targeted at archaeologists, historians, social scientists or similar disciplines at all levels, from graduate students, PhDs and postdocs to professional researchers, and from academic, public and commercial backgrounds. Participants who successfully complete the course and the final assignment will receive a certificate, a grade and credits (5 EC).

For more information and the registration procedure please see: https://leidenonline.neolms.com/visitor_catalog_class/show/1332483

MANIFESTO: Romanists, let’s do complexity! (open access)

Our manifesto for complexity science in Roman studies is now published open access in the Theoretical Roman Archaeology Journal. It is the result of true collaboration between a big team of scholars passionate about this topic, with the generous support of the journal editors and the TRAC Edinburgh conference organisers. Thank you all!

Roman Studies is a fascinating and thriving field, but it could really do with a bit more formalisation of the many complex theories we produce. This manifesto aims to highlight this need and argues this can only be done through constructive and frequent collaboration between romanists with difference specialisms. Let’s do this together!

Read the full paper for free here.

Here an excerpt, our 10 point manifesto:

A Manifesto for Complexity Science in Roman Studies

Complexity science has proven a highly constructive addition to virtually every other discipline (Mitchell 2009; Downey 2012; Chattoe-Brown 2013; Castellani 2018). The authors of this paper are convinced there is no reason why complexity science and formal modelling methods could not make equally constructive contributions to Roman Studies. We present our arguments as a 10-point manifesto for the use of complexity science in Roman Studies and for making its associated computational tools part of our ‘tools of the trade’. The statements in our manifesto are purposefully short and to-the-point to ensure their clarity, but they should be understood as strongly rooted in and supported by the subsequent sections of this paper where we showcase their applicability to particular research topics.

  1. The study of complex systems is integral to Roman Studies.
  2. It is appropriate to conceptualise and study the Roman state, its territory and inhabitants, and their interactions with states and peoples within and across their borders at any time during its history as a complex system.
  3. It is also appropriate to conceptualise and study phenomena that are aspects of the Roman complex system as complex systems in their own right: society, politics, economy, religion, institutions, communities, military, micro-regions and others.
  4. Complexity science is a constructive and necessary contribution to existing research perspectives in Roman Studies, providing theoretical approaches and methods for studying key concepts in complex phenomena, such as emergence, self-organisation or self-organised criticality.
  5. Constructively applying complexity science requires breaking through disciplinary silos to look for similar patterns, processes and models across different scientific domains to gain a more holistic view of the system in question and to avoid reinventing the wheel.
  6. To understand the behaviour of complex systems and to propose falsifiable theories of Roman complex systems one needs to use the formal tools developed to represent and study such systems.
  7. A multiscalar approach is integral to studying complex Roman systems, to understand how local interactions of Roman individuals resulted in regional patterns and the dynamics of the whole system.
  8. The plausibility and internal coherence of any hypothesis explaining a data pattern or emergent phenomenon should be formally demonstrated.
  9. Formalism and transparency should be employed in hypothesis formation, testing and reporting as well as in data analysis and management. All research output should be reproducible.
  10. Traditional archaeological and historical methods, fieldwork, geochemical analysis, close reading, epigraphy, numismatics etc. are not in any way less crucial or informative than complexity science approaches. It is only by taking full advantage of all scientific techniques available to us – especially the confrontation of empirical data and modelling approaches – that we can make progress in understanding the Roman past.

CAA Netherlands/Flanders in Leuven. CFP

The CAA Dutch and Flemish chapter will take place in Leuven this year! My Alma Mater 🙂 The call for papers is out now and I can very much recommend attending this amazing conference and visiting beautiful Leuven.

CFP deadline: 2 september

Conference dates: 29-30 October

Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology Netherlands/Flanders is pleased to inform you that the 2019 local chapter meeting will be held in Leuven, Belgium, October 29–30th, 2019(http://www.caanlfl.nl/?q=node/69). The event is organised by the Department of Archaeology at the KU Leuven in collaboration with the Ghent Centre for Digital Humanities. The aim of the meeting is to bring together academic and commercial archaeologists, as well archaeology students. The conference will be preceded by a workshop-day (October 28th, 2019). Further details on the workshops will be announced shortly.
With ever increasing ubiquity of digital tools and practices, and applications related to data science in archaeology, the organising committee is expecting a prolific event that critically focuses on the theory and practice of digital and quantitative methods in archaeology. The topics that can be addressed by the participants include (but not limited to) the theoretical and methodological approaches on, and case studies in:

  • Big data and text mining
  • Data visualisation and 3D modelling
  • Use of programming languages
  • Data management (plans)
  • GIS applications and geospatial analysis
  • Open data and online publishing
  • Linked data and semantic web

within the domains of Archaeology and Cultural Heritage.

Location
The meeting will take place in the Justus Lipsiuszaal of the Faculty of Arts of the KU Leuven.
Address:
Justus Lipsiuszaal (room: lett. 08.16)
Blijde Inkomststraat 21
3000 Leuven

Programme
October 28: Workshops
October 29: Conference
October 30: Conference

Abstract guidelines
We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers on any of the above topics. Abstract in Dutch or English should be sent to meeting2019@caanlfl.nl. Abstracts will be considered by the organising committee. Abstract should include name and surname, university, institute or company (if applicable), e-mail, topic for which is applied, and abstract text (max. 300 words). Deadline for abstract submission is Monday, September 2, 2019.

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