Network analysis at CAA NL-FL-DE in Ghent

caanlIt’s not often that I get to see network analysis as one of the themes in an archaeological conference! So I’m delighted to see it feature so prominently at this year’s joint meeting of the CAA Netherlands/Flanders and Germany joint meeting. I presented at the conference last year and can definitely recommend it. Do consider submitting an abstract or attending. There’s also a LIDAR workshop for those who are into that.

When? 24-25 November 2016

Where? Ghent, Belgium

Deadline Call for Papers: 1 September 2016

Joint Chapter Meeting CAA-DE and CAA-NL-FL 2016.

Ghent University, November 24th – November 25th, 2016

CAA Netherlands/Flanders is pleased to inform you that the 2016 Joint Chapter Meeting of CAA Netherlands/Flanders and CAA Germany will be held in in Ghent, Belgium, November 24–25, 2016, in collaboration with the Department of Archaeology of Ghent University and the Flemish Heritage Agency. This conference will be the fourth in a row after three successful conferences in Münster (2010), Groningen (2012) and Cologne (2014). Like in previous years, participation is not limited to members of both CAA chapters but open to all interested colleagues. Students are especially welcome to attend.

The aim of the CAA meetings is to bring together academic and commercial archaeologists with a particular interest in using mathematics and computer science for archaeological research. For the 2016 Joint Chapter Meeting of CAA, we kindly invite papers focussing on the following themes (for details see below):

  • Statistical Analysis / Network Analysis in Archaeology
  • Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology
  • Digital Archaeology and the Wider Public
  • Archival and Management of (3D) Archaeological Data

The conference will be preceded by a LiDAR-workshop (November 23rd, 2016). During this workshop, participants will learn what LiDAR data is, how to effectively work with LiDAR (e.g. by building digital elevation and surface models and by looking into different LiDAR visualisation and analysis techniques), and how to use it for archaeological research.

Location
The venue will take place in the Virginie Lovelinggebouw (VAC) in Ghent, located immediately next Ghent’s main train station (Gent-Sint-Pieters).
Address:
Virginie Lovelinggebouw (VAC)
Koningin Maria Hendrikaplein 70
9000 Gent
Belgium
http://www.vlaanderen.be/nl/vlaamse-overheid/virginie-lovelinggebouw-vac…

Programme
November 23rd, 14h – 18h: LiDAR workshop
November 24th, 09h – 18h: Conference
November 25th, 09h – 18h: Conference

Abstract Submission Guidelines
We welcome proposals for 20 minute papers on any of the above topics. Abstract in English should be sent to meeting2016@caanlfl.nl, by (September 1st, 2016). Abstracts will be considered by the committees of CAA NL/FL and CAA DE. Abstract should include name and surname, university, institute or company (if applicable), address and telephone number, e-mail, session for which is applied, and abstract text (max 500 words).

Prices

  • Early bird registration: € 30 (students: € 20)
  • Regular: € 40 (students: € 25)
  • LiDAR workshop: € 10

Register early as space is limited.

Important Dates

  • September 1st, 2016: Deadline for Abstract Submission
  • October 1st, 2016: Notification of Acceptance
  • September 15th, 2016 to October 30th, 2016: Early Bird Registration
  • November 1st, 2016: Regular registration

Conference Topics
Statistical Analysis / Network Analysis in Archaeology
Archaeological research relies on large and diverse datasets. Directly analysing or comparing these datasets to detect meaningful trends or patterns is often not ‘easy’ or straightforward. Statistical and quantitative methods can provide valuable methods in this respect, when applied in a critical manner. Apart from such approaches, in recent years also network analysis has risen as a means for examining the structure of archaeological relationships and deciphering the complexity of archaeological datasets.
This session will explore the current state of the art of these methods, and showcase some best practices in applying these approaches to archaeological data.

Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology
Archaeology predominantly used to focus on the study of excavations results of ‘sites’, i.e. locations in the landscape with concentrations of past activities. The rise of ‘landscape archaeology’ and the widespread and ever increasing application of remote sensing methods since the 1980’s has shifted this focus to wider geographical frameworks, allowing for a more ‘holistic’ approach regarding the study of past activities in the natural and ‘cultural’ landscapes. In recent years, the amount, quality and resolution of remote sensing datasets (LiDAR, multi- and hyperspectral photography, geophysical techniques…) has increased enormously.
This session focuses on how to cope with these large amounts of remote sensing data and how an integrated and/or innovative approach of these technologies can lead to new insights of past landscapes.

Digital Archaeology and the Wider Public
In the last decades, there is a trend in the archaeological community to increase public awareness and involvement. Even though the connection with one’s past is very clear, public interest in archaeology remains limited.
Digital technologies increasingly introduce new possibilities of communicating with the public. This session focuses on how interactive, 3D and 4D technologies can help in communicating the results of archaeological research to a broad public, help to improve the awareness of archaeological research, and help to improve public engagement or participation in the archaeological community.

Archival and Management of (3D) Archaeological Data
In recent years, the practice of archaeological fieldwork evolved from two-dimensional pen and paper recordings over digital documentation towards full three-dimensional documentation. This challenges not only the application of new practices of fieldwork, but also the way these new digital archives are used and managed. Several problems arise, for example regarding the evolution of software, the durability of digital carriers and data formats. This session aims to deal with the challenges of new ways of data collection and analysis and the consequences for long-term data use, management, archiving and accessibility.

LiDAR-workshop
During this preconference workshop, participants will learn what LiDAR data is, how to effectively work with LiDAR (e.g. by building digital elevation and surface models and by looking into different LiDAR visualisation and analysis techniques), and how to use it for archaeological research.

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