Online course Agent-based modelling for archaeologists

Want to learn agent-based modelling in depth, in a way that is tailored for archaeologists, but don’t have much time to live and study abroad? Then I can very much recommend this short course at the University of Leiden. It is a paid module but you do get actual credits at the end of it and great private supervision throughout by world-leading experts.

Starting September 2019, the Archaeology Faculty at the University of Leiden, the Netherlands will be offering an online course in Agent-based Modelling for Archaeologists. The course is open to Leiden students and for external participants and will be held entirely online.

The course format follows the SPOC (Small Private Online Course) principles. That is, while fully online the number of participants is limited to 30 and each of them gets personalised attention from the course instructors. The course consists of:

  • short prerecorded video lectures,
  • reading assignments coupled with short quizzes,
  • practical tutorials in programming and model development,
  • online collaborative tasks,
  • other activities, and
  • regular assignments and a large final assignment, which are graded by the instructors.

You can read more about the SPOC format and the previous edition of the course in this paper: https://journal.caa-international.org/articles/10.5334/jcaa.26/

The objective of the course is to provide students with a deep understanding of the possibilities and limitations of modelling and simulation as a tool in archaeology and to teach them the basics of computer programming, enabling them to create new models and simulations for research purposes. At the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • identify and translate implicit, conceptual models (scientific hypotheses formulated in natural language) into formal explicit models in a wide range of social and environmental research contexts;
  • build simulation systems to run, test and expand such models following best scientific practice;
  • develop intermediate programming skills with the ability to independently develop and test computer code;
  • interpret simulation results and assess their validity in archaeological and implementation terms;
  • understand the role of simulation techniques in modern scientific practice and appreciate both the potential and the challenges of the method

The course is targeted at archaeologists, historians, social scientists or similar disciplines at all levels, from graduate students, PhDs and postdocs to professional researchers, and from academic, public and commercial backgrounds. Participants who successfully complete the course and the final assignment will receive a certificate, a grade and credits (5 EC).

For more information and the registration procedure please see: https://leidenonline.neolms.com/visitor_catalog_class/show/1332483

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MANIFESTO: Romanists, let’s do complexity! (open access)

Our manifesto for complexity science in Roman studies is now published open access in the Theoretical Roman Archaeology Journal. It is the result of true collaboration between a big team of scholars passionate about this topic, with the generous support of the journal editors and the TRAC Edinburgh conference organisers. Thank you all!

Roman Studies is a fascinating and thriving field, but it could really do with a bit more formalisation of the many complex theories we produce. This manifesto aims to highlight this need and argues this can only be done through constructive and frequent collaboration between romanists with difference specialisms. Let’s do this together!

Read the full paper for free here.

Here an excerpt, our 10 point manifesto:

A Manifesto for Complexity Science in Roman Studies

Complexity science has proven a highly constructive addition to virtually every other discipline (Mitchell 2009; Downey 2012; Chattoe-Brown 2013; Castellani 2018). The authors of this paper are convinced there is no reason why complexity science and formal modelling methods could not make equally constructive contributions to Roman Studies. We present our arguments as a 10-point manifesto for the use of complexity science in Roman Studies and for making its associated computational tools part of our ‘tools of the trade’. The statements in our manifesto are purposefully short and to-the-point to ensure their clarity, but they should be understood as strongly rooted in and supported by the subsequent sections of this paper where we showcase their applicability to particular research topics.

  1. The study of complex systems is integral to Roman Studies.
  2. It is appropriate to conceptualise and study the Roman state, its territory and inhabitants, and their interactions with states and peoples within and across their borders at any time during its history as a complex system.
  3. It is also appropriate to conceptualise and study phenomena that are aspects of the Roman complex system as complex systems in their own right: society, politics, economy, religion, institutions, communities, military, micro-regions and others.
  4. Complexity science is a constructive and necessary contribution to existing research perspectives in Roman Studies, providing theoretical approaches and methods for studying key concepts in complex phenomena, such as emergence, self-organisation or self-organised criticality.
  5. Constructively applying complexity science requires breaking through disciplinary silos to look for similar patterns, processes and models across different scientific domains to gain a more holistic view of the system in question and to avoid reinventing the wheel.
  6. To understand the behaviour of complex systems and to propose falsifiable theories of Roman complex systems one needs to use the formal tools developed to represent and study such systems.
  7. A multiscalar approach is integral to studying complex Roman systems, to understand how local interactions of Roman individuals resulted in regional patterns and the dynamics of the whole system.
  8. The plausibility and internal coherence of any hypothesis explaining a data pattern or emergent phenomenon should be formally demonstrated.
  9. Formalism and transparency should be employed in hypothesis formation, testing and reporting as well as in data analysis and management. All research output should be reproducible.
  10. Traditional archaeological and historical methods, fieldwork, geochemical analysis, close reading, epigraphy, numismatics etc. are not in any way less crucial or informative than complexity science approaches. It is only by taking full advantage of all scientific techniques available to us – especially the confrontation of empirical data and modelling approaches – that we can make progress in understanding the Roman past.

CAA Netherlands/Flanders in Leuven. CFP

The CAA Dutch and Flemish chapter will take place in Leuven this year! My Alma Mater 🙂 The call for papers is out now and I can very much recommend attending this amazing conference and visiting beautiful Leuven.

CFP deadline: 2 september

Conference dates: 29-30 October

Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology Netherlands/Flanders is pleased to inform you that the 2019 local chapter meeting will be held in Leuven, Belgium, October 29–30th, 2019(http://www.caanlfl.nl/?q=node/69). The event is organised by the Department of Archaeology at the KU Leuven in collaboration with the Ghent Centre for Digital Humanities. The aim of the meeting is to bring together academic and commercial archaeologists, as well archaeology students. The conference will be preceded by a workshop-day (October 28th, 2019). Further details on the workshops will be announced shortly.
With ever increasing ubiquity of digital tools and practices, and applications related to data science in archaeology, the organising committee is expecting a prolific event that critically focuses on the theory and practice of digital and quantitative methods in archaeology. The topics that can be addressed by the participants include (but not limited to) the theoretical and methodological approaches on, and case studies in:

  • Big data and text mining
  • Data visualisation and 3D modelling
  • Use of programming languages
  • Data management (plans)
  • GIS applications and geospatial analysis
  • Open data and online publishing
  • Linked data and semantic web

within the domains of Archaeology and Cultural Heritage.

Location
The meeting will take place in the Justus Lipsiuszaal of the Faculty of Arts of the KU Leuven.
Address:
Justus Lipsiuszaal (room: lett. 08.16)
Blijde Inkomststraat 21
3000 Leuven

Programme
October 28: Workshops
October 29: Conference
October 30: Conference

Abstract guidelines
We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers on any of the above topics. Abstract in Dutch or English should be sent to meeting2019@caanlfl.nl. Abstracts will be considered by the organising committee. Abstract should include name and surname, university, institute or company (if applicable), e-mail, topic for which is applied, and abstract text (max. 300 words). Deadline for abstract submission is Monday, September 2, 2019.

CAA 2020 Oxford call for a networks session

Please see below the call for sessions for the CAA 2020 conference in Oxford. I will be attending and would love to co-chair a network research session. If anyone is interested in brainstorming with me about a possible network topic for the session and in co-chairing the session with me then please do get in touch in the coming days.
We are delighted to announce that the call for sessions for next year’s international Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology conference (CAA 2020) is now open.  The call for sessions and submission form can be found here:
Call for sessions – CAA 2020

The closing date for session submissions is 18th July 2019.  Full details regarding the call for sessions can be found at the link above.

The conference will take place from 14th to 17th April 2020 in Oxford, UK, hosted by the School of Archaeology at the University of Oxford.  More details can be found in the following locations:

CAA2020 website: https://2020.caaconference.org/

CAA2020 on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/CAA_2020

CAA2020 on Facebook: Security Check Required

Email the CAA2020 team at: caa2020@arch.ox.ac.uk

CFP computational simulation in archaeology

The following session on computational simulation in archaeology will be of interest to readers of this blog.

Dear Colleagues,

The Science and Technology in Archaeology and Culture Research Center (STARC; http://starc.cyi.ac.cy/) of the Cyprus Institute (http://www.cyi.ac.cy/) is pleased to announce the dates for the 2nd International Congress on Archaeological Sciences in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East (ICAS-EMME 2): 12-14 November 2019. Abstract submissions are due on 30th of June, with acceptance notifications in mid-June 2019. More details are here: https://icasemme2.cyi.ac.cy/

We would like to bring the following session to your attention:

Computational Simulations in Archaeology: simulating city network dynamics in the Mediterranean basin.

Today it is widely recognised that computational methods can be used in archaeology to help understanding the transformation of urban conditions and phenomena in time by means of emergence, as well as to help testing and assessing research theories and hypotheses, by bringing together archaeological and environmental data with social systems. These approaches build on complexity theory, social science, urban modelling and economics, urban planning and geography, and network science. This session calls for research on the use of computational methods in the study of archaeological data at the urban scale, with a special focus on Mediterranean cities and city networks and interactions in the EMME region.

This session invites papers that seek to examine Mediterranean city networks, city life, and urban structure by using computational methods, such as:

*      complexity theory and use of archaeological data in urban simulations;

*      modelling / mapping of uncertainty;

*      spatial interaction models;

*      urban modelling and space syntax;

*      urban morphology;

*      geo-spatial data and simulation;

*      agent-based modelling, cellular automata, neural networks, swarm behaviour and emergence in archaeological studies;

*      virtual environments and real-time interactive visualisation of urban/spatial data, for immersion, education and interpretation purposes.

We also welcome papers that use digital tools and data analytics to study spatial interactions, flows, urban dynamics and morphology, and interpret urban phenomena, as well as theoretical papers that discuss the prospects and challenges of the science of cities in archaeology.

Georgios Artopoulos, Eleftheria Paliou and Thilo Rehren on behalf of the Organisation Team

Contact: icasemme2@cyi.ac.cy<mailto:icasemme2@cyi.ac.cy>

Sociology jobs Oxford: 3 assistant professorships, 3 postdocs

Although in sociology, the below jobs might be of interest:

Deadline: 7 June 2019

3 Assistant Professorships (termed University Research Lecturers in Oxford), University of Oxford, UK
For detailed information see here.

3 Posts as Postdoctoral Researcher in Demographic Science (see further below)

———-

Job Details
Departmental Research Lecturer (3 posts)
Department of Sociology, Park End Street, Oxford
Grade 8: £40,792 – £48,677 p.a.

The Department of Sociology, University of Oxford would like to appoint three creative and inspirational Departmental Research Lecturers to work within the new innovative interdisciplinary environment of the Leverhulme Centre for Demographic Science, headed by Professor Melinda Mills.

We are looking for ambitious early-career researchers who want to develop an independent research programme within one or more of the seven linked programmes of the Demographic Science Centre, together with delivering academic teaching and supervision.

Duties are divided as 70% research time (we value your development as an independent researcher and scientist) and up to 30% teaching (we value your career progression and development of skills). Research can be in any area of the LCDS, but the positions will be formally located within the Department of Sociology, who hosts the LCDS. Research needs to be follow the aims of the LCDS which is to be innovative, disruptive, interdisciplinary and realign conventional thinking. Teaching will involve leading or contributing to courses in quantitative methods, advanced methods, life course research, demographic and research methods and the opportunity to develop your own course. You may also have the opportunity to supervise PhD (DPhil) or other Master’s levels students.

Applicants should hold a PhD in an area related to the LCDS such as demography, sociology, biology, genetics, economics, econometrics, criminology, statistics, epidemiology or public health, geography, computer science or another related discipline. Candidates should be able to evidence an outstanding research and publication record, demonstrate excellent communication skills, including the ability to give a high standard of presentations to various groups, and the ability to engage graduate students and the broader academic research community. An ability and willingness to work both independently and as part of a team is vital.

The posts are available for a fixed-term duration of 5 years, ideally starting on 1 September 2019, or as soon as possible thereafter.

Please direct enquiries about the role to Professor Melinda Mills (Melinda.mills@sociology.ox.ac.uk).

You will be required to upload a statement of research interests, CV and details of two referees as part of your online application (references will only be requested for shortlisted candidates).

Only applications received before 12.00 midday on 7 June 2019 can be considered. Interviews are likely to take place in the last week of June or first week of July 2019.

Contact Person : HR Team Vacancy ID : 140547
Contact Phone : Closing Date : 07-Jun-2019
Contact Email : penny.taylor@sociology.ox.ac.uk
Click on the link(s) below to view documents Filesize
Job Details
Departmental Research Lecturer (3 posts)
Department of Sociology, Park End Street, Oxford
Grade 8: £40,792 – £48,677 p.a.
The Department of Sociology, University of Oxford would like to appoint three creative and inspirational Departmental Research Lecturers to work within the new innovative interdisciplinary environment of the Leverhulme Centre for Demographic Science, headed by Professor Melinda Mills.

We are looking for ambitious early-career researchers who want to develop an independent research programme within one or more of the seven linked programmes of the Demographic Science Centre, together with delivering academic teaching and supervision.

Duties are divided as 70% research time (we value your development as an independent researcher and scientist) and up to 30% teaching (we value your career progression and development of skills). Research can be in any area of the LCDS, but the positions will be formally located within the Department of Sociology, who hosts the LCDS. Research needs to be follow the aims of the LCDS which is to be innovative, disruptive, interdisciplinary and realign conventional thinking. Teaching will involve leading or contributing to courses in quantitative methods, advanced methods, life course research, demographic and research methods and the opportunity to develop your own course. You may also have the opportunity to supervise PhD (DPhil) or other Master’s levels students.

Applicants should hold a PhD in an area related to the LCDS such as demography, sociology, biology, genetics, economics, econometrics, criminology, statistics, epidemiology or public health, geography, computer science or another related discipline. Candidates should be able to evidence an outstanding research and publication record, demonstrate excellent communication skills, including the ability to give a high standard of presentations to various groups, and the ability to engage graduate students and the broader academic research community. An ability and willingness to work both independently and as part of a team is vital.

The posts are available for a fixed-term duration of 5 years, ideally starting on 1 September 2019, or as soon as possible thereafter.

Please direct enquiries about the role to Professor Melinda Mills (Melinda.mills@sociology.ox.ac.uk).

You will be required to upload a statement of research interests, CV and details of two referees as part of your online application (references will only be requested for shortlisted candidates).

Only applications received before 12.00 midday on 7 June 2019 can be considered. Interviews are likely to take place in the last week of June or first week of July 2019.

Contact Person : HR Team Vacancy ID : 140547
Contact Phone : Closing Date : 07-Jun-2019
Contact Email : penny.taylor@sociology.ox.ac.uk
Click on the link(s) below to view documents Filesize

https://www.recruit.ox.ac.uk/pls/hrisliverecruit/core_document_api_2.view_erecruit_document?

Dept Research Lecturer JD April 2019 395.2
Return to Search Results Apply Now

Dept Research Lecturer JD April 2019 395.2
Return to Search Results Apply Now

———-

Deadline: 7 June 2019

3 Posts as Postdoctoral Researcher in Demographic Science, University of Oxford, UK

Job Details
Postdoctoral Researcher in Demographic Science (3 posts)
Department of Sociology, Park End Street, Oxford
Grade 7: £32,236 – £39,609 p.a.

The Department of Sociology, University of Oxford would like to appoint three creative, exciting and innovative Postdoctoral Researchers who will work within the new innovative interdisciplinary environment of the Leverhulme Centre for Demographic Science, headed by Professor Melinda Mills.

The postholders will be responsible for their own independent research projects within a discrete area of the wider LCDS research programme, while being encouraged to work with others in the centre and our international partners. Research needs to follow the aims of the LCDS which is to be innovative, disruptive, interdisciplinary and realign conventional thinking.

In this first round of postdoctoral recruitment we are looking for researchers in the area of digital and computational demography, causality and methodological advances, sociogenomics and molecular genetics. Supervision and collaboration can occur within the core domains and with researchers within the LCDS. Duties of this exciting new role will include publishing excellent research, representing the Centre at meetings and seminars, presenting papers at external events and generating creative ideas for research income and assisting with future proposals. The postholder will have the opportunity to teach if desired.

Applicants should hold a PhD, or be close to completion, in demography, sociology, economics, geography, statistics, molecular genetics, biology, epidemiology, computer science, or another related discipline. Candidates should be able to evidence a good research and publication record commensurate with career stage, demonstrate excellent communication skills including academic writing and have confidence in presenting research proposals and results.

The posts are available initially for a fixed-term duration of 3 years, ideally starting on 1 September 2019, or as soon as possible thereafter.

Please direct enquiries about the role to Professor Melinda Mills (Melinda.mills@sociology.ox.ac.uk).

You will be required to upload a statement of research interests, CV and details of two referees as part of your online application (references will only be requested for shortlisted candidates).

Only applications received before 12.00 midday on 7 June 2019 can be considered. Interviews are likely to take place in the last week of June or first week of July 2019.

Contact Person :    HR Team    Vacancy ID :    140330
Contact Phone :        Closing Date :    07-Jun-2019
Contact Email :    penny.taylor@sociology.ox.ac.uk

Representing Networks, University of Cologne, 5-6 June 2019

This event will be of interest to readers of this blog. The program looks great and I can definitely recommend you attend this. Don’t forget to register before 31 May.

via HNR and Danijela Stefanović:

Representing Networks: Past and Present

Workshop at the University of Cologne,

5-6 June 2019

Please register at networks.cologne@gmx.de by 31 May

For more information, see http://aegyptologie.phil-fak.uni-koeln.de

PROGRAM

Wednesday, 5 June

17:30               Welcome and registration

18:15               Public key note lecture:

From Microhistory to the Global Network – The World of the Treasurer Senebi (Danijela Stefanović, University of Cologne, University of Belgrade)

Reception in the rooms of Egyptology, sponsored by Uschebti e.V.

Thursday, 6 June

09:30               Welcome and registration

09:45-10:00     Introduction

10:00-11:30     How Many Networks? Representing Dynamic Social Change Using Archaeological Network Methods (Fiona Coward, Bournemouth University)

An Ivory Diaspora: Digitizing Exchange & Production Networks in the Medieval World (Sara Ann Knutson, University of California, Berkeley)

11:30-11:45     Coffee break

11:45-12:30     Casting a Wide Net: The Distant Reading of Archival Documents from Babylon (Maarja Seire, University of Leiden)

12:30-14:00     Lunch break

14:00-15:30     From Networks to High-dimensional Geometry and Back (Allon Wagner, Tel-Aviv University, University of California, Berkeley)

Representing Credit and Kinship in the 19th Century: Between Exploration and Simulation (Martin Stark, ILS- Research Institute for Regional and Urban Development)

15:30-15:45     Coffee break

15:45-16:30     Representing the Community of Ptolemaic Pathyris as Network Models: Possibilities and Limitations (Lena Tambs, University of Cologne)

16:30-17:00     Closing discussion

Trier SNA summer school

The following summer school will be of interest to readers of this blog:

Via the HNR list:

13. Trierer Summer School on Social Network Analysis

16. – 21. September 2019

Die Trierer Summer School on Social Network Analysis bietet im Rahmen eines einwöchigen Intensivangebots eine umfassende Einführung in die theoretischen Konzepte, Methoden und Anwendungen der Sozialen Netzwerkanalyse. Die Veranstaltung richtet sich an NachwuchswissenschaftlerInnen und Studierende aller geistes-, kultur- und sozialwissenschaftlichen Fächer, die sich mit der Analyse sozialer Strukturen beschäftigen und Einblick in die Methoden der Sozialen Netzwerkanalyse (SNA) nehmen möchten.

Weiterführende Informationen:

Das Angebot auf einem Blick

  • eine Woche intensive Einführung in die SNA durch ExpertInnen
  • individuelle Forschungsberatung durch die DozentInnen
  • einführende Literatur im Online-Apparat sowie Lernmaterialien
  • Einführung in gängige Software zur SNA (R, Pajek, Gephi)
  • Workshop „Mixed Methods“/„Visual Network Research“ (Net-Map, VennMaker)
  • Workshop „Prozessgenerierte Daten und historische Netzwerkanalyse“
  • Verpflegung mit Snacks und Getränken während der Veranstaltung
  • angenehme Lernatmosphäre mit vielen Gelegenheiten für “social networking”
  • abendliches Rahmenprogramm (gemeinsames Abendessen/Stadtrundgang)

Die Summer School wird finanziert mit Mitteln der: Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft und des Ministeriums für Bildung, Wissenschaft, Weiterbildung und Kultur

Contribute to network session for Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference

Amanda Althoff, from the University of Aberdeen in Scotland, is preparing a network session proposal for the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology (CASA) Conference, 13 – 15 September 2019. This year’s theme is ‘New Frontiers in Archaeology’. The conference will be held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, Cambridge. For more information, see CASA website:https://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/casa
Please find the session abstract below. If you wish to join this session then don’t hesitate to get in touch with Amanda soon, she aims to submit the session proposal in the next weeks and it would be good to have a few confirmed presentations:

Session Proposal: Interconnected – Network Approaches in Archaeology.

As the modern world becomes more and more entangled, archaeologists are increasingly interested in empirical ways to grasp the interconnectedness of things and people in the past. Network approaches in archaeology have shown their potential to quantify and analyse connectedness, and more ambitious and innovative case studies have entered the world of Archaeology in the past decade. Networks of economy and trade, power relations, communication are well established resources for inquiry, but equally, networks of material entanglement, identities and intra-site specific practices have recently shown their potential. This session invites contributors to explore avenues for incorporating network studies of varying natures into archaeological studies, and highlight their ability to offer new insights into existing data. Possible themes range from the practicalities of software or data collection and management, as well as educational possibilities to introduce archaeology students to network studies, to individual case studies incorporating network approaches. Regional or intra-site specific studies, assemblage-focused studies, or relationality of practice or ontology are highly welcome. More theoretical approaches of entanglement and relationality, such as actor-network theory, may offer further inspiration for structural network studies and are explicitly included in the discussion on the interconnectedness of people, past and present.

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