GIS and networks for archaeology: spring school for PhD students

There’s a cool Brussels spring school coming up on GIS and networks for archaeology. I’m giving the networks keynote, yay 🙂 The program looks very detailed and hands-on, so if you’re a PhD student in search of specialised training on this topic I can recommend signing up.

Where? Brussels, Belgium
When? 4-8 April 2022
Application deadline? 10 January 2022
Fee? 100 EUR

Website: https://crea.centresphisoc.ulb.be/fr/evenement/crea-patrimoine-spring-school-2022-visualizing-archaeological-data-gis-mapping-and

From the event website:

Archaeologists use different methods for visualizing their data – for analysis and for presentation. The international spring school will discuss successful ways to visualize these data and challenges and successes in the application of both GIS and network analysis (NA). Through an integration between theory, studies, and tutored practice, we aim to access the two learnt methods to each participant for independent use.

Monday 4.4.22: open for the public

09:30-10:30 ‱ Registration for workshop participants

10:30-12:00Introduction to the Spring School + The Importance of (good) Data Visualization in Humanities (part 1) SĂ©bastien DE VALERIOLA (UniversitĂ© libre de Bruxelles & ICHEC)

12:30-14:00>The Importance of (good) Data Visualization in Humanities (part 2), Sébastien DE VALERIOLA (Université libre de Bruxelles & ICHEC)

15:00-16:30 ‱ Keynote

From Mapping to Geospatial Modelling in Archaeology: Where Do We stand, and Where to Go Next?, Philip VERHAGEN (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)

17:00-18:30 ‱ Keynote

Archaeology, Materiality and Geo-Space Half a Century after the “Spatial Turn”, Piraye HACIGÜZELLER (Universiteit Antwerpen)

Tuesday 5.4.22: GIS workshop (9:30-17:30)

Soektin VERVUST (Vrije Universiteit Brussel), Hagit NOL, Jean VANDEN BROECK-PARANT, Mostafa ALSKAF (UniversitĂ© libre de Bruxelles)

Wednesday 6.4.22: open for the public 

10:30-12:00

Network Analysis: Definitions and Basic Concepts

Nicolas RUFFINI-RONZANI (Université catholique de Louvain & Université de Namur), Sébastien DE VALERIOLA (Université libre de Bruxelles & ICHEC)

12:30-14:00

An Introduction to the Gephi Network Analysis Software Nicolas RUFFINI-RONZANI (Université catholique de Louvain & Université de Namur), Sébastien DE VALERIOLA (Université libre de Bruxelles & ICHEC)

15:00-16:30 ‱ SNA case studies

Approaching the Social Networks of Temple Builders in 4th C. BC Greece: Methodological Reflections, Jean VANDEN BROECK-PARANT (UniversitĂ© libre de Bruxelles)

Can We Trust Centrality? The Robustness of Centrality Metrics in Historical Networks, SĂ©bastien DE VALERIOLA (UniversitĂ© libre de Bruxelles & ICHEC)

17:00-18:30 ‱ Keynote

Does Archaeology Need Network Science? Illustrated through Medieval Visibility Networks in the Himalayas and Roman Economic Networks, Tom BRUGHMANS (Aarhus University)

19:00 ‱ Dinner for workshop participants

Thursday 7.4.22: network analysis workshop (9:30-17:30)

Nicolas RUFFINI-RONZANI (Université catholique de Louvain & Université de Namur), Sébastien DE VALERIOLA (Université libre de Bruxelles & ICHEC)

Friday 8.4.22: “Bring Your Own Data” workshop (9:30-15:30)

▶ Who is this for? Twenty PhD students and Postdocswith a preference for:‱ archaeologists‱ beginners in both methods (GIS and SNA)‱ people fluent in English

▶ How much does it cost? 100 €(notice that tuition includes coffee breaks but excludes accommodation, traveling expenses, and food!)

▶ Where and how to apply? Send us an email to visualizing.brussels@gmail.com and we will send you a short questionary (so that we know you and your research better). After a selection process, we will confirm or decline your application. The registration will be finalized after your payment of tuition.

▶ What is the deadline for applying? January 10th, 2022

▶ When are answers given? By February 5th, 2022

▶ What is the deadline for paying tuition? February 28th, 2022

▶ The workshop is organized by: Hagit NOL, AgnĂšs VOKAER, SĂ©bastien DE VALERIOLA, Nicolas RUFFINI-RONZANI, Soektin VERVUST

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement no 801505

Present your work at The Connected Past in Heraklion, Greece!

The next iteration of our awesome series of The Connected Past conferences is scheduled to take place in the gorgeous Heraklion Archaeological Museum on Crete in Greece. This amazing venue features a fantastic collection of especially Minoan archaeology and the conference even includes an expert-guided trip to Knossos. You don’t want to miss this!

As always, this event will provide a friendly and inclusive platform to share your work on archaeological and historical network research. All work on general network method and theory topics are welcome! But this conference will also feature a particular focus on Aegean archaeology.

CFP deadline: 31 January 2022

More information: https://connectedpast.net

CALL for PAPERS

The Connected Past conference, September 1-2, 2022, Heraklion, Crete

Networks in the archaeology of the ancient Aegean

Co-organisers:

  • Heraklion Archaeological Museum (Director: Stella Mandalaki; conference contact: Katerina Athanasaki,Head of the Department of Exhibitions, Education and Public Relations)
  • University of Toronto (Carl Knappett, Department of Art History)

The ancient Aegean and Mediterranean have been key testing grounds for the development of network concepts and methods in archaeology. A distinctive feature of network analysis in these areas is its uptake among both prehistorians and ancient historians, with studies ranging from the Neolithic to Late Antique. This two-day conference offers an opportunity for scholars working on all periods in the Aegean to come together to exchange ideas, methods and results. We also welcome presentations on general network method and theory topics that show potential for application to studies of the Aegean past.

As part of the ongoing support that The Connected Past offers for the development of network analysis techniques and theory among students and practitioners, we are also hosting a practical workshop, offered by The Connected Past group, at which interested researchers can learn some of the basics of network science in practice. This will take place during the two days before the conference (i.e. August 30th and 31st).

  • Where: Heraklion Conference Centre, Heraklion, Crete https://www.cccc.gr/en
  • When: 1-2 September 2022
  • Registration fee: €40 (€20 for graduate students) 
  • Associated activities: tour of Heraklion Archaeological Museum www.heraklionmuseum.gr and of the Palace of Knossos 
  • Details on accommodation options to follow

Please submit paper proposals (title, and 150 word abstract) by January 31st 2022, to carl.knappett@utoronto.ca and kathanasaki@yahoo.com

More information about The Connected Past Heraklion will appear on The Connected Past website: https://connectedpast.net

CFP Limes congress deadline 15 September

We will host a session dedicated to simulation and the Roman frontiers at the Limes congress, on 21-27 August 2022 in Nijmegen (the Netherlands). Do you work on computational approaches in Roman Studies, simulation, GIS, large digital data? Consider presenting your work in our session #31: Simulating the Limes. Challenges to computational modelling in Roman Studies.

Deadline 15 September

Here is the session abstract:

The increasing availability of large digital data sets requires archaeologists and historians to develop or adopt new analytical tools in order to detect and understand socio-economic and cultural patterns and to compare these at wider spatial and temporal scales. Simulation and other types of computational modelling are rapidly becoming a key instruments for this type of research. They are used to bridge the gap between theoretical concepts and archaeological evidence. These models can be of an exploratory nature, or attempt to closely emulate historical dynamics, and enable us to understand the mechanisms underlying, for example, e.g. population changes or economic systems.

Despite having access to large amounts of high-quality data, Roman studies have so far been relatively slow in adopting computational modelling, and Limes studies are no exception. The Limes is a particular case since each border region has its own characteristics, environmental setting, cultural background and specific relationship with the ‘core’ but also shares common features derived from being at the ‘outskirts’ of political, economic and cultural life. The interaction between these two dimensions is highly complex. Thus, the Limes constitutes an arena where formal modelling methods have particularly high potential. However, key challenges to this approach are i) the proper integration of archaeological and historical data sets; ii) a good understanding of what proxies to use, and iii) the computational power needed for modelling at larger scales.

We invite papers that showcase examples of modelling within the broader thematic setting of the Limes, taking these challenges into account. Suggested topics of interest are the economy of the Limes, urbanisation and settlement dynamics, demography, military campaigns, and relationships between the Limes, the rest of the Roman Empire and the zones beyond the frontier. Statistical modelling, GIS, simulation (e.g., Agent-based modelling), network models and other types of formal approaches are all welcome. Comparative studies are especially welcomed.

More details on the CFP:

The LIMES Congress XXV Scientific Committee is pleased to invite you to submit paper proposals that will present new discoveries and ideas in the field of Roman Frontier Studies. Paper proposals should include the following information:

  • Title of Presentation
  • Speaker information (organization/company, e-mail address)
  • Co-authors information (organization/company, e-mail address)
  • Themed session selection (Please choose general session if paper does not fit in offered session selections) 
  • Abstract of the paper (max 300 words)

Each proposed paper must be submitted online through the LIMES Congress XXV website no later than the extended deadline 15th of September 2021. Paper proposals will be reviewed by the Session Organisers and the Scientific Committee. The presenter of the paper will be informed by email by mid-February 2022. The congress schedule will be announced by March 2022. Please be aware of the following:

  • To create a well-balanced and diverse congress program only one paper per person is allowed.
  • Presentation time is limited. We advise you to prepare for a ± 15 min presentation. The exact timing and time slot will be communicated once the program is complete.
  • A short Q & A with the audience will be held at the end of each presentation.
  • Session Chairs are also eligible to present one paper or poster.
  • The official congress languages are English, French, and German.
  • In case your paper was not selected for presentation you can be invited to present it in poster format.

Please find below the proposed sessions. If you have any questions please contact us at: info@limes2022.org 

Presentation at EAA tomorrow: pre-print online

Tomorrow at the EAA virtual conference I will present in session 487: A NETWORK FOR AGENT-BASED MODELLING OF SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL
SYSTEMS IN ARCHAEOLOGY (NASA).

I will be presenting seven claims about why we should simulate Roman economies. And if you’re not into Romans, that’s OK: the claims are very generalisable to all of archaeology 🙂

The presentation will be based on a paper that is in print, in an entire volume dedicated to simulating Roman economies. Check out the preprint of the paper on Academia.

And if you can’t wait, here’s the seven claims already 🙂

  1. Formal modelling and computational simulation are necessary techniques for explicitly representing our complicated theories (or aspects of them), and for testing them against historical and archaeological evidence.
  2. Complex systems simulation is the only suitable approach for identifying emergent properties in complex systems.
  3. The Roman economy was a highly complex system. Theories describing this system are necessarily extremely complicated.
  4. Building complicated models is a step-by-step cumulative process, where simplification is key.
  5. Simulation should be integrated as one of our tools of the trade. This is an addition to and enrichment of current practice; it is not in conflict with current practice.
  6. There are many different and competing views on the nature of the Roman economy. Simulation studies will enhance constructive multivocality of these theoretical debates.
  7. Good simulation studies of the Roman economy necessarily rely on collaboration across specialisms (where simulation is a specialism in the same way as ceramology or osteology). Encouraging this means integrating the basics of simulation approaches into education in classical studies.

Two positions in the Dissident Networks Project

From David ZbĂ­ral

The Dissident Networks Project (DISSINET, https://dissinet.cz/) – an ERC Consolidator Grant-funded research initiative based at Masaryk University (Brno, Czech Republic) – currently offers two positions:

1) PhD studentship or research fellowship in medieval history (deadline 30 Sept 2021)

2) Research fellowship in computational linguistics / corpora / NLP (deadline 15 Sept 2021)

1) PhD studentship or research fellowship in medieval history

Full information: https://www.muni.cz/en/about-us/careers/vacancies/65077

Deadline for applications: 30 September 2021 23:59 (CET – Prague).

This is a 3-year Ph.D. studentship or research fellowship (from November 2021 to October 2024) for historians with a medieval focus. 

The focus of research for the successful candidate will be the computational study of medieval religious dissent and inquisition, and will be founded on medieval inquisition records (c. 1230-1520).

We are looking for candidates with background in history, medieval studies, study of religions, medieval Latin language and literature or a similar field. They can be either:

(a) M.A. graduates interested in enrolling in doctoral studies in the Study of Religion at Masaryk University; or

(b) Ph.D. candidates approaching the completion of studies; or

(c) holders of a doctoral degree.

A successful M.A. graduate applying for a doctoral position would receive the normal doctoral stipend for full-time Ph.D. students at Masaryk University, and would in addition be offered a contract for their participation in the DISSINET project (weighted at 50% of a full-time employee). They would be assigned a Ph.D. supervisor within the team.

A successful Ph.D. candidate approaching the completion of their studies and applying for a post-doctoral position would be able to negotiate the amount of work time they can initially dedicate to the project (minimum 50% required).

A successful holder of a doctoral degree applying for a post-doctoral position would be offered a full-time role.

The successful candidate will develop their own research direction in consultation with the Principal Investigator (Dr. David ZbĂ­ral). They will receive hands-on training, building on their core skills as medievalists through the use of computational techniques. The ERC-funded positions thus represent a unique opportunity for building a truly cutting-edge research profile.

Requirements:

  • M.A. or Ph.D. degree in history, medieval studies, medieval Latin language and literature or a similar field.
  • Latin language.
  • Competence in historical research.
  • Competence in academic writing.
  • Computer-friendly mindset.
  • English language (C1 or higher).

Other qualifications of interest to the project:

  • Further languages relevant for reading the historiography of medieval heresy and inquisition.
  • Experience with structured data (spreadsheets, databases).
  • Interest in social scientific approaches to history.
  • Experience in heresy & inquisition studies, notarial records, medieval religion or late medieval history.

We do not expect candidates to possess all of these “other qualifications of interest”, and recognise there are other qualifications beyond this list that can enhance DISSINET’s research profile.

We offer:

  • Freedom to pursue your intellectual interests and to work creatively across disciplines in an exciting frontier-research project.
  • Growth in interdisciplinary research.
  • Competitive salary commensurate with an ERC-funded project.
  • Individual research budget for participating in conferences and workshops, choosing books and software to be purchased, etc. (ca. 4,000 € each year).
  • Participation in writing high-profile publications in history, social network analysis, and the digital humanities.
  • Friendly and informal working environment.

Responsibilities:

  • Leading a key research strand within the larger project, concerning selected sets of medieval inquisitorial records.
  • Compiling structured datasets on the basis of inquisitorial records.
  • Co-authoring articles (incl. as lead author).
  • Participating in the team’s discussions, meetings, tutorials, and other activities.
  • Contributing to the project’s visibility (papers at conferences, publications, online outcomes, social media, etc.).
  • Reading and summarizing literature, contributing to the project’s annotated bibliography.
  • Organizational and administrative responsibilities related to the project.

Please see https://www.muni.cz/en/about-us/careers/vacancies/65077 for the details.

2) Research fellowship in computational linguistics / corpora / NLP (deadline 15 Sept 2021)

Full information: https://www.muni.cz/en/about-us/careers/vacancies/64897 

Deadline for applications: 15 September 2021 23:59 CET (UTC+1)

The research of the successful applicant will focus on the discursive patterns in medieval inquisitorial records, with the aim of shining a new light on the production of these texts, their discourses, and the religious cultures they describe.

We are searching for a research fellow with one of the following types of profile:

(a) digital humanist, with competence in one or more historical languages and some experience in programming; or

(b) computational linguist, NLP specialist or text mining specialist, with interest in history or historical languages;

(c) another kind of mixed/interdisciplinary profile, with some of the previously mentioned competencies and strong interest in working on a historical research project.

The successful candidate will develop their own research direction in consultation with the Principal Investigator (Dr. David ZbĂ­ral), focusing on the computational text processing and analysis of medieval inquisition records.

DISSINET also works extensively on the manual coding of medieval inquisitorial material, offering a significant close-reading layer of data. We focus on various computational approaches to Christian dissent and inquisition, also including social network analysis, socio-semantic network analysis, and geographic information science: the successful candidate will have the opportunity to produce mixed-methodology work in this collaborative context. The ERC-funded position thus represents a unique opportunity for building a truly cutting-edge research profile.

The position is residential (although with reasonable flexibility for pandemic-related travel restrictions). Brno is a very pleasant university city ca. 2 hours by direct train connection from Vienna and Prague, and offers all the opportunities of a modern metropolis.

Requirements:

  • M.A., MSc. or Ph.D. degree in a relevant field.
  • Strong interest in historical research and the project’s topic.
  • Experience in computational research of textual corpora.
  • Ability to learn new techniques and adapt existing ones (e.g., customize available tools to the Latin of inquisitorial sources).
  • Programming skills (Python or R).
  • Digital text representation and annotation standards (esp. TEI/XML).
  • Competence in academic writing.
  • English language (C1 or higher).
  • Autonomy, reliability, and ability to work in close team collaboration.

Other competencies of interest to the project:

  • Historical languages (Latin, Middle English…).
  • Distributional semantics, stylometry.
  • Experience with repositories of digital texts.
  • Data standards and interoperability (e.g., RDF, linked data).
  • Version control (e.g., GitHub, GitLab…).

We do not expect candidates to possess all of these “other competencies of interest”, and recognise there may be other skills beyond this list that could enhance DISSINET’s research profile.

We offer:

  • Freedom to pursue your intellectual interests and to work creatively across disciplines in an exciting frontier-research project.
  • Growth in interdisciplinary research.
  • Competitive salary commensurate with an ERC-funded project.
  • Individual research budget (ca. 4,000 € each year) in addition to regular salary.
  • Participation in writing high-profile publications in digital humanities, computational social science, network analysis, and history.
  • Friendly and informal working environment.

Responsibilities:

  • Building a key research strand within DISSINET with a focus on the discursive patterns in medieval inquisitorial records.
  • Leading the constitution of a corpus of medieval inquisitorial records.
  • Supervising research assistants helping with the mark-up of OCR-ed texts.
  • Co-authoring articles (incl. as lead author).
  • Participating in the team’s discussions, meetings, tutorials, and other activities.
  • Contributing to the project’s visibility (papers at conferences, publications, online outcomes, social media, etc.).
  • Reading and excerpting literature.
  • Organizational and administrative responsibilities related to the project.

Please see https://www.muni.cz/en/about-us/careers/vacancies/64897 for details.

Present in our session at the Limes congress in Nijmegen, August 2022

Present in our computational modelling session! Submit your abstract by 1 September 2021. Session 31. More information here and below: https://limes2022.org/call-program/

We draw your attention to the call for papers for the postponed 21st Limes Congress, that (we sincerely hope) will be held in Nijmegen from 21-27 August 2022 (https://limes2022.org/call-program/, submission deadline 1 September). Last year, we submitted a session on computational modelling that we hope will still be of interest to you, either as a presenter, or as attendant (Session 31 – Simulating the Limes. Challenges to computational modelling in Roman Studies).

If you are interested in presenting, please contact us in advance of submitting your paper proposal, so we can try to coordinate things as much as possible. We would also be very grateful if you could spread this call in your own networks,

Looking forward to seeing many of you in Nijmegen,

With best wishes,

Philip Verhagen
Iza Romanowska
Tom Brughmans
Marek Vlach

31. Simulating the Limes. Challenges to computational modelling in Roman Studies

Philip Verhagen

Affiliation: Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Session Abstract: The increasing availability of large digital data sets requires archaeologists and historians to develop or adopt new analytical tools in order to detect and understand socio-economic and cultural patterns and to compare these at wider spatial and temporal scales. Simulation and other types of computational modelling are rapidly becoming a key instruments for this type of research. They are used to bridge the gap between theoretical concepts and archaeological evidence. These models can be of an exploratory nature, or attempt to closely emulate historical dynamics, and enable us to understand the mechanisms underlying, for example, e.g. population changes or economic systems.

Despite having access to large amounts of high-quality data, Roman studies have so far been relatively slow in adopting computational modelling, and Limes studies are no exception. The Limes is a particular case since each border region has its own characteristics, environmental setting, cultural background and specific relationship with the ‘core’ but also shares common features derived from being at the ‘outskirts’ of political, economic and cultural life. The interaction between these two dimensions is highly complex. Thus, the Limes constitutes an arena where formal modelling methods have particularly high potential. However, key challenges to this approach are i) the proper integration of archaeological and historical data sets; ii) a good understanding of what proxies to use, and iii) the computational power needed for modelling at larger scales.

We invite papers that showcase examples of modelling within the broader thematic setting of the Limes, taking these challenges into account. Suggested topics of interest are the economy of the Limes, urbanisation and settlement dynamics, demography, military campaigns, and relationships between the Limes, the rest of the Roman Empire and the zones beyond the frontier. Statistical modelling, GIS, simulation (e.g., Agent-based modelling), network models and other types of formal approaches are all welcome. Comparative studies are especially welcomed.

Call for Papers 

The LIMES Congress XXV Scientific Committee is pleased to invite you to submit paper proposals that will present new discoveries and ideas in the field of Roman Frontier Studies. Paper proposals should include the following information:

  • Title of Presentation
  • Speaker information (organization/company, e-mail address)
  • Co-authors information (organization/company, e-mail address)
  • Themed session selection (Please choose general session if paper does not fit in offered session selections) 
  • Abstract of the paper (max 300 words)

Each proposed paper must be submitted online through the LIMES Congress XXV website no later than the 1st of September 2021. Paper proposals will be reviewed by the Session Organisers and the Scientific Committee. The presenter of the paper will be informed by email by mid-February 2022. The congress schedule will be announced by March 2022. Please be aware of the following:

  • To create a well-balanced and diverse congress program only one paper per person is allowed.
  • Presentation time is limited. We advise you to prepare for a ± 15 min presentation. The exact timing and time slot will be communicated once the program is complete.
  • A short Q & A with the audience will be held at the end of each presentation.
  • Session Chairs are also eligible to present one paper or poster.
  • The official congress languages are English, French, and German.
  • In case your paper was not selected for presentation you can be invited to present it in poster format.

Please find below the proposed sessions. If you have any questions please contact us at: info@limes2022.org 

CFP social network analysis Middle Ages

This event will be of interest to readers of the blog.

https://medievalsna.com/events/

CALL FOR PAPERS: IMC LEEDS 2022!

DEADLINE: 1 SEPTEMBER 2021

International Medieval Congress,

University of Leeds,

4-7 July 2022

Social Network Analysis Researchers of the Middle Ages (SNARMA) is looking for proposals for a strand entitled ‘Network Analysis for Medieval Studies’ at the International Medieval Congress at Leeds in 2022. The precise number of sessions and themes of each session will be decided based on the submissions. We would like to encourage the submissions to be as interdisciplinary as possible: the strand is very much open to those working on networks in language, literature, archaeology, etc., as well as history. We would also like to encourage submissions spanning the whole breadth of the Middle Ages chronologically. Papers may be focussed on particular case studies or on methodological questions such as the challenges proposed by fragmentary sources. We hope to present sessions which showcase a variety of different historical source types, such as charters, letters, chronicles, literary sources, and so forth. Papers should engage with either mathematical social network analysis or the theory of social network analysis.

Please email medievalSNA@gmail.com with a title and abstract up to 250 words, as well as you name, position, affiliation, and contact details, by 1 Sept. 2021

Topics may include but are not confined to:

  • Using SNA to define borders within datasets
  • Temporal, dynamic, or stochastic networks
  • Geographical networks
  • Diffusion models of disease spread
  • Diffusion models of religious beliefs
  • Data modelling with historical sources
  • Opportunities and challenges of assigning motivations to historical actors using social network theory
  • Digital prosopography and SNA
  • Advantages and disadvantages of particular software packages
  • SNA as a visualization tool
  • SNA as an heuristic tool
  • ‘Learning curve’ issues in the Humanities
  • Networks of:
    • Objects or artefacts
    • Manuscripts or texts
    • Political elites
    • Kinship and marriage
    • Trade and commerce
    • Block modelling with medieval communities
    • Religious dissent or pilgrimage/ cults of saints
    • Literary worlds; eg. Norse sagas or French chansons de  geste

New MA in Digital and Computational Archaeology, Cologne

There’s not a lot of degree programmes dedicated to computational archaeology specifically. And I can certainly recommend this new programme in Cologne: delivered by the amazing and inspiring Prof. Dr. Eleftheria Paliou, a very diverse range of modules, and completely in English.

Do share this with your colleagues and students. Application deadline 30 June.

From the website:

Digital and Computational Archaeology is concerned with the development and application of digital technologies and computational methods in archaeology. The MA Digital and Computational Archaeology is designed to equip archaeology graduates with practical, theoretical and critical skills in a variety of established and emerging digital technologies, and support a career in academia, cultural resource management, museums as well as public and private cultural heritage organisations. Students of this programme are offered the opportunity to use the facilities of the Cologne Digital Archaeology Laboratory (CoDArchLab), which is equipped with teaching, research and study spaces, numerous workstations, a variety of commercial and open source software programs, as well as specialised computational imaging equipment.

Students of the MA Digital and Computational Archaeology will have the opportunity to:

  • Develop core computing skills in Data Science (database theory and design, data visualisation and representation, network science) and Web technologies and become acquainted with current issues in archaeological data management and policy.
  • Familiarise themselves with the use of state-of-the-art 3D technologies and media and learn which techniques are best suited for data capture, documentation and analysis in different situations and contexts (e.g. fieldwork, museum, research projects).
  • Think critically on the application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), spatial analysis, and computational modelling in archaeology, and learn how to best apply computational methods to gain insights into human behaviour and socio-political organisation in past natural and built environments.
  • Learn to identify current issues, problems and developments in the field of Digital Humanities and gain practical experience in the application and development of methods and tools that can benefit Humanities research more broadly.
  • Take work placements (Praktika) in excavations, museums, or cultural heritage management organisations and test their practical skills in real life situations.

Admission requirements

Applicants for the MA Digital and Computational Archaeolgy should hold a bachelor’s degree (with at least 180 CP) in archeology or an archaeological sub-discipline, such as Prehistoric Archaeology, Classical Archaeology, Ancient West Asian Studies, Archaeology of Roman Provinces, Egyptology or similar. Bachelor graduates of neighboring subjects may also be admitted after case-by-case-review, if at least 60 CP have been obtained in an archaeological sub-discipline during the BA studies. A decision upon the admission of students will be made by the Admissions Committee.

The MA Digital and Computational Archaeology is fully taught in English. Knowledge of English needs to be certified at the C1 level in the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). Knowledge of German is not required for admission or the completion of the Master programme, but students will have the opportunity to choose from a number of German electoral courses, should they wish to.

Bursaries for PhD students to attend The Connected Past, deadline 21 June

We invite PhD candidates who plan to attend The Connected Past conference in Aarhus in September 2021 to apply for one of six bursaries towards the expenses of their attendance. https://connectedpast.net/aarhus-2020/bursaries-for-phd-students/

Maximum amount: 5000 DKK (ca. 673 EUR or 810 USD)

Deadline: June 21st 2021 at 23:00 CET

Notification of successful applicants: June 28th 2021

How to apply? Send a 1-page motivation letter, proof of PhD status (card, enrolment certificate, URL to profile) and a 2-page CV to connectedpast2020@gmail.com and register for the conference before the application deadline.

What expenses can be covered? Accommodation, economy travel tickets, and conference registration, all documented by receipts (please note that we are only allowed to reimburse tickets booked directly through an airline and not via Momondo or other search engines).

When will bursary amounts be paid? Successful candidates will be reimbursed after conference attendance.

What should the motivation letter include? Why you would benefit from the event, breakdown of estimated expenses, list other sources of funding accessible to you.

More information: https://connectedpast.net

These bursaries are made possible thanks to support by the Carlsberg Foundation.

Six bursaries for PhD candidates

The restrictions imposed due to the coronavirus pandemic have significantly affected the career development opportunities of current PhD students, by effectively removing more than a year of academic networking time. It is crucial for academic activities to continue to be organised to offer science communication and networking opportunities in physical, blended or online formats, and to support the active participation of PhD students. Thanks to the support from the Carlsberg Foundation, we can offer six bursaries to facilitate six outstanding PhD students to attend The Connected Past 2021 in person (restrictions permitting).

PhD course

This year, PhD candidates attending the conference will also have the opportunity to attend a free PhD course at Aarhus University awarding 1.5 ECTS. The PhD course will take place in a blended format on the two days preceding the conference: 27-28 September 2021. The course will give you practical skills with network research in archaeology and history, and will share the experiences of a number of practitioners. Applicants need to apply separately for the conference and PhD course. For more information and registration: https://phdcourses.dk/Course/80630

About the Carlsberg Foundation

The Carlsberg Foundation is a commercial foundation that supports basic scientific research within the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities conducted by Danish researchers and international researchers connected to Danish research environments.

The funds for awards mainly come from the profits of Carlsberg A/S, in which the Carlsberg Foundation has a controlling interest. The Carlsberg Foundation was founded by Brewer J.C. Jacobsen in 1876.

Programme online historical networks conference out now

A must-attend for historians and archaeologists interested in networks. This conference brings together English-, French-, and German-language communities, to offer a rich and inspiring programme. CANNOT WAIT!!!!

Via the HNR conference team:

The conference „Historical Networks – RĂ©seaux Historiques – Historische Netzwerke“ co-organised by the Historical Network Research group and RĂ©seaux et Histoire will take place from Wednesday, June 30th until Friday, July 2nd, 2021. The complete programme is now online and registration is open. For more information about the programme, registration and more details about the conference, please visit our conference website (http://hnr2021.historicalnetworkresearch.org/).

Questions, suggestions, notes regarding the conference? Write us at conference@historicalnetworkresearch.org. 

WORKSHOPS – WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30TH, 9:30 A.M. CET – 4:15 P.M. CET

On Wednesday, June 30th, HNR+ResHist 2021 will offer four workshops for beginners as well as advanced network researchers:

Analysis of Two-Mode Networks with Python
Demival Vasques Filho

Exponential Random Graph Models: Theory and Applications on Historical Networks
Antonio Fiscarelli

From historical source to network data
Claire Lemercier

Introduction to Social Network Analysis: Basics and Historical Specificities
Martin Grandjean

Registration for the workshops takes place through EventBrite. Please note that the number of participants per workshop is limited and that the deadline for registering is 23 June (23:30 pm CEST).

KEYNOTES

HNR+ResHist2021 is proud to present two keynotes which will be delivered by Marion Maisonobe (CNRS, Paris) and Matteo Valleriani (MPIWG, Berlin). You can find their abstracts here below. To attend the keynotes, please register for the conference (deadline: 23 June, 23:30 pm CEST).

OPENING KEYNOTE – WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30TH, 4:30 P.M. CET
THE SPHAERA CORPUS IN ITS SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CONTEXT

MATTEO VALLERIANI, MARYAM ZAMANI, MALTE VOGL, HASSAN EL-HAJJ, HOLGER KANTZ

The lecture will first provide an overview of the corpus and of its historical meaning from the perspective of the main research question of the project, namely the question concerned with the mechanisms of knowledge homogenization in the early modern time and, therefore, with those processes that allowed for the emergence of a scientific identity of Europe.

Secondly, the major results concerned with the semantic analysis of the corpus and based on a formalization of the data in terms of a multiplex network will be shown. In particular it will be shown a) how a family of historical sources was detected that then executed a hegemonic role all over Europe therefore greatly contributing to the process of homogenization, b) how treatises, denominated “great transmitters”, allowed for the perpetuation of traditional knowledge for about 200 years however in the context of continuous innovation, and c) how different treatises were identified that are the main responsible for the impactful and enduring innovations.

Third, the lecture will present a new network model able to display the process of knowledge transformation in its social and economic context. The lecture therefore concludes by showing analyses conducted in order to understand correlations between families of treatises (semantic knowledge) on one side and societal groups on the other.

CLOSING KEYNOTE – FRIDAY, JULY 2ND, 3:30 P.M. CET
«LES LIEUX QUI FONT LIENS»: SEVERAL WAYS TO INTEGRATE PLACES IN NETWORK ANALYSIS

MARION MAISONOBE

We identify three traditional ways of integrating places in network analysis. Firstly, it is common to start from relationships between individuals, families and businesses and to aggregate these relationships to consider the interactions between places that they create (A). Secondly, places can be the instrument of network construction. In other words, the co-presence in certain places makes it possible to deduce relationships between entities (B). Thirdly, the network can be immediately „spatial“ in the sense that the entities in relation as well as their links are materially anchored in space (for example, a hydrographic network, a metro map or a road network) (C). We will see that the sources, analytical issues and methods, and types of visualisation associated with these different networks vary. Our presentation will focus more specifically on type A and B networks by taking up, detailing and updating the methodological proposals of a collaborative research work on the visualization of scholarly worlds from Antiquity to the present day (Andurand et al., 2015).

«LES LIEUX QUI FONT LIENS»: DIFFÉRENTES MANIÈRES D’INTÉGRER LES LIEUX EN ANALYSE DE RÉSEAU

Nous distinguons trois maniĂšres classiques d’intĂ©grer les lieux en analyse de rĂ©seaux. PremiĂšrement, il est frĂ©quent de partir de relations entre individus, familles, entreprises et d’agrĂ©ger ces relations pour considĂ©rer les interactions entre lieux qu’elles dessinent (A). DeuxiĂšmement, les lieux peuvent ĂȘtre l’instrument de la construction du rĂ©seau. Autrement dit, c’est la co-prĂ©sence en certains lieux qui permet de dĂ©duire des relations entre entitĂ©s (B). TroisiĂšmement, le rĂ©seau peut ĂȘtre immĂ©diatement « spatial Â» au sens oĂč les entitĂ©s en relation ainsi que leurs liens sont matĂ©riellement ancrĂ©s dans l’espace (par exemple, un rĂ©seau hydrographique, un plan de mĂ©tro ou une trame viaire) (C). Nous verrons que les sources, les enjeux et mĂ©thodes d’analyse ainsi que les types de visualisation associĂ©es Ă  ces diffĂ©rents rĂ©seaux varient. Notre exposĂ© se concentrera plus particuliĂšrement sur les rĂ©seaux du type A et B en reprenant, dĂ©taillant et actualisant les propositions mĂ©thodologiques d’un travail de recherche collaboratif sur la visualisation des mondes savants de l’AntiquitĂ© Ă  nos jours Ă  partir de diffĂ©rentes sources (Andurand et al., 2015).

We look forward to welcoming you online!

The Historical Networks – RĂ©seaux Historiques – Historische Netzwerke 2021 Organisers:
Laurent Beauguitte (CNRS | Paris)
Aline Deicke (Academy of Sciences and Literature | Mainz)
Marten DĂŒring (University of Luxembourg)
Antonio Fiscarelli (University of Luxembourg)
Claire Lemercier (CNRS | Paris)
Ingeborg van Vugt (University of Utrecht)

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