Bursaries for PhD students to attend The Connected Past, deadline 21 June

We invite PhD candidates who plan to attend The Connected Past conference in Aarhus in September 2021 to apply for one of six bursaries towards the expenses of their attendance. https://connectedpast.net/aarhus-2020/bursaries-for-phd-students/

Maximum amount: 5000 DKK (ca. 673 EUR or 810 USD)

Deadline: June 21st 2021 at 23:00 CET

Notification of successful applicants: June 28th 2021

How to apply? Send a 1-page motivation letter, proof of PhD status (card, enrolment certificate, URL to profile) and a 2-page CV to connectedpast2020@gmail.com and register for the conference before the application deadline.

What expenses can be covered? Accommodation, economy travel tickets, and conference registration, all documented by receipts (please note that we are only allowed to reimburse tickets booked directly through an airline and not via Momondo or other search engines).

When will bursary amounts be paid? Successful candidates will be reimbursed after conference attendance.

What should the motivation letter include? Why you would benefit from the event, breakdown of estimated expenses, list other sources of funding accessible to you.

More information: https://connectedpast.net

These bursaries are made possible thanks to support by the Carlsberg Foundation.

Six bursaries for PhD candidates

The restrictions imposed due to the coronavirus pandemic have significantly affected the career development opportunities of current PhD students, by effectively removing more than a year of academic networking time. It is crucial for academic activities to continue to be organised to offer science communication and networking opportunities in physical, blended or online formats, and to support the active participation of PhD students. Thanks to the support from the Carlsberg Foundation, we can offer six bursaries to facilitate six outstanding PhD students to attend The Connected Past 2021 in person (restrictions permitting).

PhD course

This year, PhD candidates attending the conference will also have the opportunity to attend a free PhD course at Aarhus University awarding 1.5 ECTS. The PhD course will take place in a blended format on the two days preceding the conference: 27-28 September 2021. The course will give you practical skills with network research in archaeology and history, and will share the experiences of a number of practitioners. Applicants need to apply separately for the conference and PhD course. For more information and registration: https://phdcourses.dk/Course/80630

About the Carlsberg Foundation

The Carlsberg Foundation is a commercial foundation that supports basic scientific research within the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities conducted by Danish researchers and international researchers connected to Danish research environments.

The funds for awards mainly come from the profits of Carlsberg A/S, in which the Carlsberg Foundation has a controlling interest. The Carlsberg Foundation was founded by Brewer J.C. Jacobsen in 1876.

The Connected Past registration, PhD bursaries, and PhD school

Registration for The Connected Past conference is now open. Moreover, we will award bursaries to six excellent PhD students to attend the conference, and we announce a two-day PhD school and workshop preceding the conference.

The Connected Past conference will feature the best of archaeological and historical network research in 25 presentations and a keynote by Prof. Juan Barceló. The event will take place in-person on 29-30 September 2021 at Aarhus University (Denmark), but virtual attendance is possible (please register for virtual attendance). Registration open now.

We are also delighted to announce that bursaries to cover travel, accommodation and registration are available for six excellent PhD students attending The Connected Past conference in person. Please note that conference registration is a requirement for bursary applicants. Deadline: June 21st 2021 at 23:00 CET. Apply now! 

PhD students who plan to attend The Connected Past conference can register for free for a two-day PhD school (27-28 September 2021) awarding you 1.5 ECTS by Aarhus University. The PhD school will take place on Aarhus University’s Moesgaard Campus, but virtual participation is possible. This two-day workshop teaches you practical skills in network research for archaeologists and historians, with expert advice by practitioners. More information and registration

We hope to see many of you in lovely Aarhus!

The #TCPAarhus team

Tom Brughmans
Lieve Donnellan 
Rubina Raja 
Søren Sindbæk 

Save the date: The Connected Past 2021 Aarhus

Interested in archaeological or historical networks? If you landed on this blog, you probably are. The Connected Past is our long-standing inter-disciplinary community for all those who share these interests. This year the conference will take place at Aarhus University on 29-30 September 2021 in a hybrid format. We have an awesome group of 25 papers on a wide range of topics lined up, and a keynote presentation by Joan Anton Barceló.

So put the dates in your calendar and watch this space for more news. We hope to open registration in a few months, and will provide more information on the conference format closer to the date.

Website

Abstracts

#TCPAarhus

September 29-30 2021, Aarhus University

Artefactual Intelligence

Preceded by a two-day workshop 27-28 September (more information to follow).

Schedule to be announced

Read the abstracts for the 25 accepted presentations here.

Keynote speaker is Juan Barceló on Artificial Intelligence in archaeology. 

Computational models used by archaeologists are becoming increasingly complex. We create and tackle ever larger datasets, include more parameters and make machines learn by themselves. Recent approaches to network theory in archaeology, and the historical sciences more generally, have embraced agents, agency and practice theory. But where does this leave objects? Since the earliest days of the discipline, objects have been at the core of the archaeologist’s enquiry. However, until recently, objects were left heavily undertheorised. With the advance of object-related theories, such as ANT or the New Materialism approaches, agency is extended not just to humans but to the objects and materials they handle as well. Does this mean that digital archaeologists and historians are to move from Artificial Intelligence to Artifactual Intelligence? And if so, how? 

Being a community of scholars interested in recent theoretical and methodological innovations in archaeology and the historical sciences, the Connected Past Conference provides a forum for presenting and discussing ongoing work on the intersection between archaeology,  history, digital approaches and theory. The conference will be preceded by a two-day practical workshop (limited capacity, open call for participants to follow soon). 

This year’s conference focuses specifically on the topic of artefacts, human and material agency, artificial and artefactual intelligence and their place within archaeological and historical network studies. In addition, we also welcome presentations on any topic related to archaeological or historical network research and complexity science. 

Conference organisers:

Lieve Donnellan 
Rubina Raja 
Søren Sindbæk 
Tom Brughmans 

Administrative support: 

Eva Mortensen

Get in touch! connectedpast2020@gmail.com

Schedule (to be announced)

Venue and attendance details (to be announced)

Travel and accommodation (to be announced)

New grant to study the centuries-long functioning of the Roman economy through ceramics, road networks and computational modelling

Soooooo happy I got awarded a Sapere Aude research leader grant by the Independent Research Fund Denmark. This is like a Danish starting grant, allowing early career researchers to pursue their research interests for four years under great conditions (roughly 6.2 million DKK: 800.000EUR). This will allow me to do what I think the study of the Roman economy really needs: quantitative identification and description of centuries-long patterns in ceramics data, creation of a high-detail Roman transport network, and formal evaluation of theories that could explain these data patterns. I simply can’t wait to get my teeth into this work! Especially because it’s a collaboration with the amazing Pau de Soto for Roman roads, Vinnie Nørskov for museology and outreach, Andrew Wilson for Roman economy studies, and Adéla Sobotkova for archaeological data analysis. More news about this project will follow (and read our announcement on the UrbNet and DFF websites), but here’s a short description of the project:

MINERVA will explore how a massive integrated economy like the Roman Empire evolved over centuries, by combining archaeological ceramics and the Roman transport network in computational simulation experiments. The project will run for four years from 2021, and will apply UrbNet’s relational perspecitve to the study of the Roman economy.


At its peak the Roman Empire covered an area similar in size to the European Union, uniting almost 100 million inhabitants. But similarities do not end here: the different peoples, languages and religions within the Empire were united under a single political system with the Roman Emperor at its head, they used the same money, followed the same trade regulations, and were subject to the same legal system. Archaeologists uncover evidence that show the ups and downs of this bustling economy. Amphora containers, for example, were used for centuries to move vast quantities of necessities such as grain from Egypt or olive oil from Spain to the capital of Rome and everywhere else in the Empire. For centuries, the flow of goods and traders along the first European transport network went virtually uninterrupted, despite limited means of communication, and transport technology and infrastructure making sea and road voyages slow and dangerous.


The material remains they left behind offer us a unique glimpse at how huge integrated economies can change and evolve over centuries. But understanding how these complex economic processes emerge from everyday behaviour of individual Romans is not a mean feat. To make this possible, this project combines state-of-the-art computer simulations, archaeological ceramics evidence, and a detailed model of the Roman road network for the first time.

MINERVA addresses three challenges related to ceramics data, Roman roads and centuries-long simulations. First, what changes are visible over periods of centuries in the distribution and consumption of Roman plates, cups, bowls and containers? And what do they reveal about the long-term functioning of the Roman economy? MINERVA aims to quantitatively identify such patterns. Second, what was the structure of the Roman transport network through which such goods were distributed? We currently do not have a highly detained model of this network, and MINERVA aims to create this. And third, How does one simulate aspects of a large economy over a period of centuries? This has never been done before because for other large economies, like the integrated markets of the EU or the US, we simply do not have data for such long timespans. This will be an exciting challenge to explore that will benefit from collaboration with economic historians.

4 fully-funded PhD fellowships at UrbNet. Come work with us!

I work at a great place: the Centre for Urban Network Evolutions at Aarhus University. It is a world-leading centre for urban archaeology, taking a networks perspective to everything it does. Love it! The centre’s focus on the archaeology of Eastern Mediterranean, Northern Europe and East Africa, using methods as diverse as excavation, networks, and isotopes, mean I am never bored talking to my many international and Danish colleagues.

It would be great to have students with an interest in these topics join us!

We offer 4 fully-funded PhD fellowship, to start on 1 February 2021.

Important: potential applicants are encouraged contact the centre director and vice director ahead of applying to discuss project ideas.

Deadline: 1 October

Application details

More information here:

PhD fellowship in the field of the Urban Societies in Past Worlds (5+3)

The Graduate School at Arts, Faculty of Arts, Aarhus University, in collaboration with the Centre for Urban Network Evolutions (UrbNet), invites applications for four fully funded PhD fellowships in Urban Societies in Past Worlds provided the necessary funding is available. This PhD fellowships are available as of 1 February 2021 for a period of up to three years (5+3). The candidates who are awarded the fellowships must commence their PhD degree programmes on 1 February 2021. 

Three of the PhD fellowships will be financed by the Centre for Urban Network Evolutions (UrbNet) and one PhD fellowship will be financed by the Graduate School at Arts.

Centre for Urban Network Evolutions (UrbNet) invites applications for 4 PhD fellowships on themes relating to urban societies in the past. We are seeking candidates from the fields of archaeology and related subjects, including geoarchaeology, cultural anthropology, environmental and material sciences and history.

The projects must align closely with UrbNet’s research themes and agendas. Please see https://urbnet.au.dk/open-calls/phd-scholarships-urban-societies-in-past-worlds/

Applications must address the following questions:

  • How can this project generate new knowledge about the evolution of urban societies in the past?
  • How does this project apply novel methods and theory?
  • How the project contribute to interdisciplinary research?
  • How would the findings be interesting beyond the specific case/setting?
  • How does the project make archaeological data and knowledge relevant in the contemporary world?

We strongly encourage potential applicants to contact the centre director and vice director to discuss project ideas.

The PhD student must complete the studies in accordance with the valid regulations for the PhD degree programme, currently the Ministerial Order of 27 August 2013 on the PhD degree programme at the universities: http://phd.arts.au.dk/applicants/thephddegreeprogramme/

Description of the graduate school’s PhD degree programme: http://phd.arts.au.dk/applicants/phdstudystructure/

Rules and regulations for the PhD degree programme at the Graduate School at Arts: http://phd.arts.au.dk/applicants/thephddegreeprogramme/  

The PhD fellow will be enrolled as a PhD student at the Graduate School at Arts, Faculty of Arts, Aarhus University, with the aim of completing a PhD degree at the Centre for Urban Network Evolutions (UrbNet), School of Culture and Society, Aarhus University.

The PhD student will be affiliated with the PhD programme History, Archaeology and Classical Studies.

The PhD student’s place of work will be the Centre for Urban Network Evolutions (UrbNet), School of Culture and Society, Aarhus University. In general, the student is expected to be present at the school on an everyday basis.

The PhD degree programme is expected to include a lengthy research stay at a foreign institution, cf. Description of the graduate school’s PhD degree programme.

School of Culture and Society’s research programme: 
http://cas.au.dk/en/research/research-programmes/

5+3 programme

When you apply for a 3-year PhD fellowship (5+3), you must have completed your two year Master’s degree (120 ECTS) no later than 31 January 2021.

The PhD fellow will be employed as a PhD student at the Faculty of Arts, Aarhus University. The terms of employment are in accordance with the agreement between the Danish Ministry of Finance and the Danish Confederation of Professional Associations (see section 6.1.4), as well as with the protocol to the agreement covering staff with university degrees in the state sector (see enclosure 5). The agreement and the protocol including amendments are available online: http://phd.arts.au.dk/applicants/thephddegreeprogramme/

Salary: http://phd.arts.au.dk/financing/salary-and-employment/salary-5-3/

Application
If you require professional guidance regarding your application for the PhD fellowship please contact the PhD programme director at History, Archaeology and Classical Studies:  http://phd.arts.au.dk/about-us/contact/

For further information, please contact Professor and UrbNet Director Rubina Raja, rubina.raja@cas.au.dk, Phone +45 27 18 83 90.

The application must be submitted in English.

All applicants must document English language qualifications comparable to an ‘English B level’ in the Danish upper secondary school (‘gymnasium’). Please see this page for further information: http://phd.arts.au.dk/applicants/english-test/  

Applications for the PhD fellowship and enrolment in the PhD degree programme can only be submitted via Aarhus University’s web-based facility.

Guidelines for the application facility: http://phd.arts.au.dk/applicants/how-to-apply/

Deadline for applications: 1 October 2020 at 23.59 Danish time (CET/CETS).
Reference number: 2020-15

During the assessments, Aarhus University can conduct interviews with selected applicants.

Digital event: Network analysis for the humanities

The end of this month I will be teaching a workshop as part of the online event ‘network analysis for the humanities’ organised by the Aarhus University Centre for Digital History (CEDHAR). Very much looking forward to it. I think it would be a great event if you wish to get some skills and inspiration for your network analysis work. Details on their website.

You can register for free online.

Date Fri 26 Jun
Time 09:10 12:00
Location Zoom Link to be provided to registered participants

Join us for the following talks in Session 1 of this event: 

9:10 – 9:30 Short introduction to network analysis – Antonio Rivero Ostoic

9:30 – 10:30 The Vistorian: Exploring Archaeological Networks – Tom Brughmans. This will be a Q&A session on a pre-recorded tutorial (to be circulated beforehand)

10:40 – 11:40 Exploratory Network Analysis with Pajek Part I: Genealogies – Anja Žnidaršič

11:45 – 12:00 Software for Network Analysis Showcases: Pajek XXL, Pajek 3XL, R packages multiplex and multigraph

Additional Information:

All are welcome, don’t be afraid to drop in and check it out! We’re asking for registrations for this event as the zoom link won’t be made public, it will only be sent to registered participants.

This is the first of two sessions we’re hosting on network analysis. Check out the panel for Session 2 here: https://cas.au.dk/en/cedhar/events/show/artikel/digital-event-network-analysis-for-humanities-session-2/ …and don’t forget to sign up for both events! The deadline for registration is June 24.

We are thankful for the support of the Research Programme at Aarhus University’s Department of History and Classical Studies.

Date Tue 30 Jun
Time 09:10 12:00
Location Zoom link to be provided to registered participants

Here is the program for the second day of our Network Analysis event:

9:10 – 11:10 Exploratory Network Analysis with Pajek Part II: Citations – Anja Žnidaršič

11:20 – 12:00 Algebraic Analysis and Visualisation of Complex Networks using R – Antonio Rivero Ostoic

Additional Information:

All are welcome, don’t be afraid to drop in and check it out! We’re asking for registrations for this event as the zoom link won’t be made public, it will only be sent to registered participants.

This is the second of two sessions we’re hosting on network analysis. Check out the panel for Session 1 here: https://cas.au.dk/en/cedhar/events/show/artikel/digital-event-network-analysis-for-humanities-session-1/ … and don’t forget to sign up for both events! The deadline for registration is June 24.

We are thankful for the support of the Research Programme at Aarhus University’s Department of History and Classical Studies.

The Connected Past 2020 in Aarhus

Delighted to announce the next instalment of The Connected Past, this time in Aarhus Denmark. The call for papers deadline is 15 March, submit your abstracts to connectedpast2020@gmail.com

Conference website

#TCPAarhus

September 24-25, Aarhus University

Artefactual Intelligence

Preceded by a two-day workshop 22-23 September (more information to follow).

Call for Papers now open (deadline 15 March)

Abstracts (max. 250 words) should be sent to connectedpast2020@gmail.com

Before March, 15th 2020*

Please include your name, affiliation, and your choice of session format (20 minute thematic presentation or 10 minute work-in-progress presentation)

*The scientific committee will seek to communicate its decision before mid-April 2020

Our keynote speakers are Marcia-Anne Dobres on agency in archaeology and Juan Barceló on Artificial Intelligence in archaeology.

Computational models used by archaeologists are becoming increasingly complex. We create and tackle ever larger datasets, include more parameters and make machines learn by themselves. Recent approaches to network theory in archaeology, and the historical sciences more generally, have embraced agents, agency and practice theory. But where does this leave objects? Since the earliest days of the discipline, objects have been at the core of the archaeologist’s enquiry. However, until recently, objects were left heavily undertheorised. With the advance of object-related theories, such as ANT or the New Materialism approaches, agency is extended not just to humans but to the objects and materials they handle as well. Does this mean that digital archaeologists and historians are to move from Artificial Intelligence to Artifactual Intelligence? And if so, how?

Being a community of scholars interested in recent theoretical and methodological innovations in archaeology and the historical sciences, the Connected Past Conference provides a forum for presenting and discussing ongoing work on the intersection between archaeology,  history, digital approaches and theory. The conference will be preceded by a two-day practical workshop (limited capacity, open call for participants to follow soon).

This year’s conference focuses specifically on the topic of artefacts, human and material agency, artificial and artefactual intelligence and their place within archaeological and historical network studies. In addition, we also welcome presentations on any topic related to archaeological or historical network research and complexity science.

We invite abstracts for 20-minute presentations on these and related topics for consideration to the scientific committee. In addition, there will be a session on general topics related to network science in archaeology and the historical sciences. We equally welcome abstracts for 10-minute presentations on work-in-progress.

Conference organisers:

Lieve Donnellan
Rubina Raja
Søren Sindbæk
Tom Brughmans

Get in touch! connectedpast2020@gmail.com

Event: digital approaches to research, Aarhus 30 October

Aarhus University in Denmark has recently seen the creation of a Centre for Digital History and the SDAM group (Social Dynamics in the Ancient Mediterranean, with loads of interest in networks). These initiatives are the driving forces behind the first in what I feel might be a series of international activities we can expect from them on the topic of digital approach in the humanities and social sciences.

Check out the program pasted below and register here!

When? 30 October 2019

Where? Aarhus University

Digital Approaches to Research in Humanities and Social Sciences 

30 October 2019, Aarhus University, building 1485, room 226

Session 1 – “Research standards and collaboration” 9:15 – 9:30 Icebreaker activity

9:30 – 9:55 Trust but verify: implications of the reproducibility crisis on technology and practice in HASS disciplines

Shawn Ross

9:55 – 10:20 Lessons learned from Data Analysis projects in Natural Language Processing with Japanese and Security Studies data – Shell Scripts, Jupyter Notebooks, and the value of doctests

Brian Ballsun-Stanton

10:20 – 10:45 Epigraphy.info and the Distributed Text Services. Collaboration with standards

Pietro Liuzzo

10:45 – 11:00 – Coffee break

Session 2 – “The realities of digital research”

11:00 – 11:25 Raising the dead; technical implications

Katrine Frøkjær Baunvig

11:25 – 11:50 DISSINET experiences and challenges in transforming history into spatial and network data

Tomáš Hampejs, Adam Mertel

11:50 – 12:15 Some challenges to coordinated, collaborative, and cross-cultural ethnographic work

Benjamin Purzycki

12:15 – 12:40 Social media data triangulation – The Danish HPV controversy as an example Marie

Louise Tørring

12:40 – 13:30 – Lunch

Session 3 – “Social Dynamics in the Ancient Mediterranean research group showcase”

13:30 – 13:45 Petrified voices: the evolution of the Graeco-Roman epigraphic production in space and time

Petra Heřmánková

13:45 – 14:00 Social dynamics in the ancient Mediterranean and the cultural evolution of moralizing religions: a text-mining approach

Vojtěch Kaše

14:00 – 14:15 Analysis with graph representation of complex networks in R: the case of Group of Twenty countries

Antonio Rivero Ostoic

14:15 – 14:30 Small data – Big Challenges: the goals and mission of the SDAM project

Adela Sobotkova

14:30 – 15:00 – Coffee break

15:00 – 16:00 “eResearch speed dating!” social activity & un-conference

Two lectureships and PhD positions in Aarhus

csm_urbnetlogo__dgf_incl__large_56c2dc7c6aThe centre for urban network evolutions at Aarhus in Denmark is recruiting two assistant professors and a number of PhDs. They very much welcome applications from people with network science experience or interests. Urbnet is a big and multi-disciplinary team with some very impressive excavations and research projects. They are very keen on scholars who wish to collaborate with others in the context of their centre. I can definitely recommend applying for one of the posts!

Deadlines in March and April.

More details on their website or below: http://urbnet.au.dk/calls/

UrbNet is recruiting a number of employees over the coming years for a variety of positions. Whenever we have open calls, they will be displayed here.

PhD scholarship: The comparative archaeology and history of early urban networks

PhD project focusing on the economic and social development of urban networks in Antiquity and the Middle Ages in a comparative perspective. The work should involve “High Definition” comparative analyses of materials, assemblages and/or textual sources, aiming to characterise the evolution and dynamics of urban sites and networks.

Read more and apply: http://talent.au.dk/phd/arts/open-calls/phd-call-4/

Deadline: 15 March 2017

PhD scholarship: The flow of archaeological materials

PhD project focusing on the flow of archaeological materials, and how these may contribute to chart the evolution and dynamics of urban networks in Antiquity and the Middle Ages. Materials may include glass, metals, ceramics or organic materials.

Read more and apply: http://talent.au.dk/phd/arts/open-calls/phd-call-5/

Deadline: 15 March 2017

PhD scholarship: Contextual analysis of urban archaeological contexts

PhD project focusing on contextual analysis of archaeological contexts from relevant urban sites of Antiquity and/or the Middle Ages and how these may contribute to map out the evolution, dynamics and connectivity of urban sites and networks. The work should involve “High Definition” analyses of assemblages in contexts such as workshops, housing, markets, streets etc., aiming to characterise the nature and scale of activities and the pace of events and processes. Themes could include: the impact of catastrophic events, slow changing urban environments (including the impact of climatic change), changing urban structure over time.

Read more and apply: http://talent.au.dk/phd/arts/open-calls/phd-call-6/

Deadline: 15 March 2017

Studentermedhjælpere til forskningsprojekt Keramik i Kontekst 893388

Institut for Kultur og Samfund, Klassisk Arkæologi søger tre studentermedhjælpere med tiltrædelse hurtigst muligt.

Studentermedhjælperne skal hjælpe Professor Rubina Raja i de kollektive forskningsprojekter Keramik i Kontekst med:

– Indsamling af litteratur
– Let redigering af manuskripter
– Hjælp til udgravningsmaterialer, herunder tegning
– Ad hoc administrative opgaver
– Praktisk hjælp af forskellig art.

Læs mere og ansøg:

http://www.au.dk/om/stillinger/teknisk-administrative-stillinger/stillinger/Vacancy/show/893388/6588/

Deadline: 17.03.2017

Studentermedhjælpere til forskningsprojekt Palmyra Portræt 893393

Institut for Kultur og Samfund, Klassisk Arkæologi søger to studentermedhjælpere med tiltrædelse hurtigst muligt.

Studentermedhjælperne skal hjælpe Professor Rubina Raja i de kollektive forskningsprojekter Palmyra Portræt Projektet med:

– Indsamling af litteratur
– Let redigering af manuskripter
– Organisering af workshops og konferencer samt udgravningsrelaterede aktiviteter
– Arbejde med Palmyra Portræt Projektets database
– Ad hoc administrative opgaver
– Praktisk hjælp af forskellig art.

Kvalifikationer
– Praktisk sans 
– Evnen til at arbejde selvstændigt, struktureret og effektivt
– Pålidelighed i forhold til arbejdstider og dage

Læs mere og ansøg:

http://www.au.dk/om/stillinger/teknisk-administrative-stillinger/stillinger/Vacancy/show/893393/6588/

Deadline: 17.03.2017

Assistant Professorships in the Archaeology of Urban Networks and Exchange 889217

The Centre for Urban Network Evolutions (UrbNet), School of Culture and Society, Aarhus University, invites applications for one or two assistant professorships, focusing on core themes within the centre’s agenda for research on urban societies in the past.

The call is for full-time, three-year positions, starting on 1 June 2017 or as soon as possible thereafter.

Place of employment: Moesgaard, Moesgaard Allé 20, 8270 Højbjerg, Denmark.

The positions
The positions represent an opportunity for eminent young researchers to set the agenda for research into the historical archaeology and/or archaeoscience of urban societies and networks from the Hellenistic Period to the Middle Ages, and to participate in one of Europe’s most groundbreaking archaeological research initiatives of this decade.

We are looking to include researchers and their projects in the centre’s work, which integrates questions and problems relating to the humanities and concerning urban development and networks.

The Centre for Urban Network Evolutions (UrbNet) explores the archaeology and history of urban societies and their networks from the Ancient Mediterranean to medieval Northern Europe and to the Indian Ocean World. We are an interdisciplinary research initiative which integrates new methods from the natural sciences with context-cultural studies rooted in the humanities. Approaching urbanism as a network dynamic, we aim to develop a high-definition archaeology to determine how urban networks catalysed societal and environmental expansions and crises in the past.

The centre’s work ranges from Northern Europe over the Levant to the East Coast of Africa. It involves empirical material from a number of existing excavation projects as well as material which has already been excavated, and concerns both theoretical and methodological issues. UrbNet strives to embrace and connect the archaeological research clusters at Aarhus University with new and advanced analytical techniques in geoscience and physics for dating and characterising archaeological sites; and creates a research environment for cross-fertilising approaches from the humanities and sciences. The centre is based at Aarhus University, School of Culture and Society, and is funded as a Centre of Excellence by the Danish National Research Foundation.

Please consult the following link: http://urbnet.au.dk/.

Read more and apply (deadline: 18 April 2017)

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