CFP social network analysis Middle Ages

This event will be of interest to readers of the blog.

https://medievalsna.com/events/

CALL FOR PAPERS: IMC LEEDS 2022!

DEADLINE: 1 SEPTEMBER 2021

International Medieval Congress,

University of Leeds,

4-7 July 2022

Social Network Analysis Researchers of the Middle Ages (SNARMA) is looking for proposals for a strand entitled ‘Network Analysis for Medieval Studies’ at the International Medieval Congress at Leeds in 2022. The precise number of sessions and themes of each session will be decided based on the submissions. We would like to encourage the submissions to be as interdisciplinary as possible: the strand is very much open to those working on networks in language, literature, archaeology, etc., as well as history. We would also like to encourage submissions spanning the whole breadth of the Middle Ages chronologically. Papers may be focussed on particular case studies or on methodological questions such as the challenges proposed by fragmentary sources. We hope to present sessions which showcase a variety of different historical source types, such as charters, letters, chronicles, literary sources, and so forth. Papers should engage with either mathematical social network analysis or the theory of social network analysis.

Please email medievalSNA@gmail.com with a title and abstract up to 250 words, as well as you name, position, affiliation, and contact details, by 1 Sept. 2021

Topics may include but are not confined to:

  • Using SNA to define borders within datasets
  • Temporal, dynamic, or stochastic networks
  • Geographical networks
  • Diffusion models of disease spread
  • Diffusion models of religious beliefs
  • Data modelling with historical sources
  • Opportunities and challenges of assigning motivations to historical actors using social network theory
  • Digital prosopography and SNA
  • Advantages and disadvantages of particular software packages
  • SNA as a visualization tool
  • SNA as an heuristic tool
  • ‘Learning curve’ issues in the Humanities
  • Networks of:
    • Objects or artefacts
    • Manuscripts or texts
    • Political elites
    • Kinship and marriage
    • Trade and commerce
    • Block modelling with medieval communities
    • Religious dissent or pilgrimage/ cults of saints
    • Literary worlds; eg. Norse sagas or French chansons de  geste

Submit your paper to CAA, deadline Monday

The CAA is my favourite conference 🙂 And it will be hosted online from Cyprus this year. The deadline to submit your papers is Monday the 1st of March. So go ahead and submit those excellent papers on computational archaeology. You can find the full list of 35 sessions here, covering all possible topics. And I want to point out the following two sessions in particular:

S28. Computational modelling in archaeology: methods, challenges and applications (Standard)

S18. Urban Complexity in Settlements and Settlement Systems of the Mediterranean (Standard)

S28. Computational modelling in archaeology: methods, challenges and applications (Standard)

Convenor(s):
Iza Romanowska, Aarhus University
Colin D. Wren, University of Colorado
Stefani A. Crabtree, Utah State University 

The steady stream of publications involving archaeological computational models is a clear sign of the discipline’s dedication to the epistemological turn towards formal theory building and testing. Where hypotheses used to be generated verbally in natural language as possible explanations, they are now increasingly often expressed as GIS, agent-based modelling (ABM) or statistical models and meticulously tested against data. The session will showcase the breadth of applications, the ingenuity of researchers deploying new or adapted methods and the depth of insight gained thanks to computational modelling.

With increasing numbers of archaeologists becoming proficient in computer programming it seems that some of the technical and training-related hurdles are being overcome. In general, while some methods in archaeological computational modelling are well established and widely deployed, others (e.g., ABM) are still an emerging subfield with many exciting and fresh applications. 

 We will structure the session upon the three major questions: :

  • The current landscape of computational modelling: what are the strong versus the weak areas? Are certain topics, time periods, types of questions more often modelled than others? If so, why is that?
  • Potential areas for growth: what are the obvious methodological and archaeological directions for computational modelling? Are technical skills still an impediment for a wider adoption?
  • Disciplinary best practice: the need for open science is well recognised among computational archaeologists, but are there other ways in which we can make it easier for members of other branches of archaeology to engage with the computational modelling?

We invite archaeological modellers to present their current case studies, discuss new methods and issues they have encountered as well as their thoughts on the role of computational modelling in general archaeological practice. Computational modelling is meant broadly here as any digital technologies that enable the researcher to represent a real-world system to test hypotheses regarding past human behaviour. 

S18. Urban Complexity in Settlements and Settlement Systems of the Mediterranean (Standard)

Convenor(s):
Katherine A. Crawford, Arizona State University
Georgios Artopoulos, The Cyprus Institute 
Eleftheria Paliou, University of Cologne 
Iza Romanowska, Aarhus University

The application of quantitative methods to the study of ancient cities and settlement networks has seen increased interest in recent years. Advances in data collection, the use of and integration of diverse big datasets, data analytics including network analysis, computation and the application of digital and quantitative methods have resulted in an increasingly diverse number of studies looking at past cities from new perspectives (e.g. Palmisano et al. 2017; Kaya and Bölen 2017; Fulminante 2019-21). This barrage of new methods, many grounded in population-level systemic thinking, but also some coming from the individual, agent-based perspective enabled researchers to investigate the structural properties and mechanisms driving complex socio-natural systems, such as past cities and towns (e.g. MISMAS; The CRANE Project; Carrignon et al. 2020). These advances have recently opened new possibilities for the study of cities and settlement systems of the Mediterranean, an area with some of the longest known records of urban occupation that could be key for studying a wide range of urban complexity topics (e.g. Lawrence et al. 2020) .

This session invites papers that deal with the applications of computational and digital methodologies, including agent-based modelling, network analysis, urban scaling, gravity and spatial interaction models, space syntax, GIS, and data mining. We look for a diverse range of studies on the interactions between cities, complex meshworks of information flow, simulations of social and socio-natural activities, as well as analyses of groups of cities and their environment (the ecosystem of resources) in the Mediterranean basin. We are especially interested in papers that use agent-based modelling to adopt a comparative and diachronic perspective to studying transformations and transitions of urban and settlement systems and works that focus on the area of Eastern Mediterranean, in particular. Potential topics of consideration include but are not limited to:

  • Settlement persistence,
  • Multi-scale spatial patterns within urban complexes and across settlements,
  • Inter and/or intra urban settlement dynamics & interactions,
  • Transitions and diachronic transformations of urban/settlement patterns,
  • Urban network interactions and modelling,
  • Urban-environmental processes; the impact of climate disturbances on cities and their resources,
  • Formal analysis of cities development of time,
  • Processes involved in urban centres formation and abandonment.

References:

S. Carrignon, T. Brughmans, I. Romanowska, (2020). Tableware trade in the Roman East: Exploring cultural and economic transmission with agent-based modelling and approximate Bayesian computation. PLoS ONE, 15, (11), e0240414. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0240414

F. Fulminante (ed), (2019-21). Research Topic: Where Do Cities Come From and Where Are They Going To? Modelling Past and Present Agglomerations to Understand Urban Ways of Life. Frontiers in Digital Humanities https://www.frontiersin.org/research-topics/7460/where-do-cities-come-from-and-where-are-they-going-to-modelling-past-and-present-agglomerations-to-u#overview

H. Serdar Kaya and Fulin Bölen, (2017). ‘Urban DNA: Morphogenetic Analysis of Urban Pattern’, International Journal of Architecture & Planning, (5), 1, 10-41. DOI: 10.15320/ICONARP.2017.15

D. Lawrence, M. Altaweel, and G. Philip, (2020). New Agendas in Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology in the Near East: Studies in Honour of Tony J. Wilkinson. Oxford: Archaeopress.

A Palmisano, A. Bevan, and S. Shennan, (2017). Comparing archaeological proxies for long-term population patterns: An example from central Italy. Journal of Archaeological Science, (87), 59-72. DOI: 10.1016/j.jas.2017.10.001

Saad Twaissi, (2017). ‘The Source Of Inspiration Of The Plan Of The Nabataean Mansion At Az-Zantur Iv In Petra: A Space Syntax Approach’, Mediterranean Archaeology and Archaeometry, (17), 3, 97-119. DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.1005494

MISAMS (Modelling Inhabited Spaces of the Ancient Mediterranean Sea), https://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/108224/en

The CRANE Project (Computational Research on the Ancient Near East) https://www.crane.utoronto.ca/

CFP: rooted cities, wandering gods

This conference will be of interest to readers of the blog. I do recommend submitting an abstract, it look like an exciting event with a great list of confirmed speakers already. Deadline March 20th.

Via the conference organisers:

Rooted Cities, Wandering Gods

Inter-Urban Religious Interactions

Planned dates: November 19th-20th, 2021 – Groningen

Organisers: Tom Britton & Adam Wiznura

(University of Groningen)

Cult, ritual and belief were crucial components of cohesive collective identities throughout the pre-modern world. Often religious practice is presented as unique, bound to the people and institutions of a single community, in service of such specific identities. Yet cities never existed in a vacuum – rather, urban societies underwent constant change brought on by movement and communication between and within their cities (Garbin & Strhan 2017). Forms and understandings of urbanity were transferred between sites through religious exchanges, often changing dramatically in the process, and their characteristics negotiated through dialogue, diplomacy, rivalry and warfare. How was religious practice bound to a single community, and when did it open up to foster regional cooperation? How could the gods of one city find resonance in another? Where could rituals and sacred sites become the focus of pilgrimage or competition? When were the institutions of a city dependent on recognition from its neighbours? Who set the boundaries of all this communication, and who contested them? This conference will explore religion as part of a web of interactions and a force for the refashioning of cities across the world, with a focus on the ancient Mediterranean and Middle East.

Looking at religion primarily as a social and ritual practice, the conference will examine the impact of religious interactions on urban memory, culture and identity across communities. It will encompass a wide range of religious activities, covering both the inter-urban networks of city-state societies and the connections between cities embedded in larger territorial states. Yet localised sub-communities within the urban frame were also key to establishing links between cities and at numerous scales. We will focus on the groups of worshippers themselves – how their structure and selfrepresentation defined engagement with the pilgrims, migrants, merchants, envoys and epistolaries who facilitated communication. Through these interactions, wider communities of practice were strung together across great distances, forming networks that both incorporated and transcended local identities.

Confirmed speakers for the conference so far include: Anna Collar (Southampton), Judy Barringer (Edinburgh), Matthias Haake (Münster), Sofia Kravaritou (Oxford), Rubina Raja (Aarhus), Ian Rutherford (Reading) and members of the project “Religion and Urbanity” (Erfurt).

We invite those interested in participating to submit papers exploring networks, movement, connectivity, religion and identity in an urban context. These should ask how interactions between cities shaped religious practice, and how cult and worship in turn affected communication. Topics may include, but are certainly not limited to:

● Pilgrimage – travel between cities for religious purposes, both by private individuals and organised by civic authorities. Who felt the need to travel in order to worship? How did this change their standing within urban communities? How did citizens facilitate and profit from the journeys of pilgrims?

● Materiality – the physical environment in which interactions took place, and the ways in which it might be differently experienced. Where were religious institutions situated in the urban landscape? How was “foreign” cultic material mapped on to the city?

● Identity – the reimagining of civic identities through religious interactions, and the creation of supra-civic communities of shared religious practice. When did new cults and ideas impact people’s self-perception as citizens and as worshippers? Did engagement with cult abroad threaten communal cohesion, or strengthen it?

● Communication – the use of shared places and practices of worship to circulate information among cities. How were political, philosophical and technological ideas transmitted and transformed through urban religion? Which interactions rested on common understandings of worship, and which required radically new ways of thinking?

We ask all those interested in contributing a paper to submit abstracts (300 words) for papers suitable for 30 minute presentations. Please send abstracts to:

rootedcities2021@gmail.com

The deadline for abstracts will be March 20th and notification of acceptance will be sent by early April. We would like to receive written drafts of papers soon after the conference as a resulting publication is envisaged, to appear in late 2022 or early 2023.

This conference takes place within the framework of the NWO project Connecting the Greeks at the University of Groningen (see connectingthegreeks.com). It is also held in conjunction with the “Religion and Urbanity: reciprocal formations” project at the University of Erfurt (see urbrel.hypotheses.org ).

NetSci/Sunbelt deadline January 24th

Submit your abstract to our session on archaeological and historical network research at NetSci/Sunbelt 2021 🙂

Deadline January 24th

Submission link: https://networks2021.net

Via the HNR newsletter:

The session “Networks and the Study of the Human Past” is part of Networks 2021: a joint Sunbelt and NetSci Conference. The conference takes place in Washington D.C. on July 6-11, 2021. The organisers are planning a hybrid in-person and remote (online) conference.

You can find the session “Networks and the Study of the Human” under number 19 in the list of organized sessions for Networks 2021. Deadline for submissions is January 24, 2021.

Networks and the study of the human past 

A growing number of studies in history and archaeology have shown that network research can constructively enhance our understanding of the human past. Moreover, it is becoming clear that archaeological and historical data sources pose interesting challenges and opportunities to social network analysis and network science. How did human social networks change over huge timescales? How can old texts and material artefacts help in answering this question? The aim of this session is to present new findings and approaches within historical and archaeological network research, and promote contacts between the various disciplines that approach past phenomena using methods derived from network analysis and network science.

This session explores the challenges and potential posed by such network studies of past phenomena, including: network modelling of past phenomena; data collection from archival evidence; incomplete and missing data; computer-assisted network extraction from texts; big data analytics and semantic network analysis based on fragmented sources; material sources as proxy evidence for social phenomena; exploration of long-term changes in past systems vs. mid-term or short-term processes; etc.

The session invites contributions from various disciplines applying the methods of formal network analysis and network science to the study of the human past. We welcome submissions concerning any period, geographical area and topic, which might include but are not limited to: migration; interpersonal relations; economy; past revolutions; covert networks of the past; industrialization; transport systems; diffusion processes; kinship; conflict and conflict solving; religion and science.

Session organizers:

Julie M. Birkholz (Ghent University & Royal Library of Belgium), Tom Brughmans (Aarhus University), Marten Düring (University of Luxembourg), Ingeborg van Vugt (University of Utrecht), Martin Stark (ILS Dortmund), David Zbíral (Masaryk University)

CFP EAA 2021 session on ancient cultural routes

I can recommend submitting an abstract to my colleagues’ session on Ancient Cultural Routes, to be held at the EAA in Kiel (Germany) on 8-11 September 2021.

Abstract submission deadline: 11th of February.

Via Francesca Mazzilli:

EAA 2021 Session #202 

Ancient Cultural Routes: 

Past Transportation as a Two-Way Interaction between Society and Environment 

Ancient regional routes were vital for interactions between settlements and deeply influenced the development of past societies and their “complexification” (e.g. “urbanization”, Roman expansion). For example, terrestrial routes required resources and inter-settlement cooperation to be established and maintained, and can be regarded as an epiphenomenon of social interactions. Similarly, navigable rivers provided a complementary inter-settlement connectivity, which conditioned the development of roads and pathways. In this sense, fluvial and terrestrial connections can be seen as the two layers of an integrated regional transportation system, which was the product of social relations and of the interplay between past societies and environment. Sea transportation is also relevant as it expands the scale of these relations and interplays. 

When we consider past societies, we implicitly or explicitly take into account interlinked aspects, such as their culture, traditions, politics, economy and religion. Under the umbrella of environment, we include topography, terrain, visibility, water management and sustainability. In view of numerous conference sessions and publications on transport networks in past societies, this session specifically focuses on how the transportation networks and their modes, from terrestrial to riverine, sea routes or a combination of them, were a crucial part of the dialogue between past societies and the environment and how the dynamic processes related to human culture were developed by this dialogue. Following this rationale, we welcome methodological papers and case studies that focus on: – How the constraints of the physical environment impacted on dynamic processes of human societies in the past, such as cultural transmission, trade, migration, and war, or in the opposite direction; 

– How the activities and motivations of human agents shaped and structured the environment with respect to mobility. 

Organizers of the session:
Francesca Mazzilli, University of Bergen
Tomáš Glomb, University of Bergen
Francesca Fulminante, University of Bristol, University Roma Tre
Franziska Faupel, University of Kiel 

If you need more details, please get in touch with the organisers. 

Abstract of no more than 300 words should be send via the https://www.e-a-a.org/eaa2021 website by the deadline 11th February 2021. Please note conference early bird registration fees until 6th April 2021. 

Networks in galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (GLAM): CfP Networks 2021

I can very much recommend this session at networks2021.net

Via the session organizers:

Session 4. Analysing Networks in galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (GLAM)

Organizers: John R. Hott (University of Virginia), Francesca Odella (University of Trento)

Primary Organizer: John R. Hott

Abstract: This session aims at discussing approaches in analysing networks in galleries, libraries, archives, and museums (GLAM) and to provide a view of current projects and results in promoting a network analysis perspective in cross-disciplinary studies.

As artefacts are becoming increasingly digital and/or digitized, there has been an increase in organizing, describing, and storing them in archival and library contexts, as illustrated by many digitalized historical archives. The increasing availability of information about artefacts opens the possibilities to analyse the connections between them in terms of references, creators and actors, as well as in terms of cross-referenced information such as shared themes, location and visitors.

At first, most of the initiatives to establish networked data by organizations and institutions focused on disciplinary perspectives and implemented specialized information classification, such as in the case of historical archival and libraries. In order to progress research, however, it is important that networks from archives, museums, and library sources interconnect and allow multiple standards and cross-classification of their artefacts. Recent undertakings, such as the Social Networks and Archival Context (SNAC) cooperative, have worked to connect repositories to share descriptions and benefit from the conceptualization of the documents, artefacts, and creators as social-documentary networks. In the European context, similarly, international institutions and organizations (Europeana, Wikidata among them) and historical archives (such as Kalliope), already provide researchers access to common classification sets and relational data sources and are promoting projects to interconnect GLAM contexts.

These initiatives reveal that a shared methodological framework, such as social network perspective in particular, is becoming central for setting guidelines, organizing repertories, and linking data from multiple institutions. Specifically, the possibility to design and perform cross-disciplinary research and to establish new connections across cultures, historical traditions, and forms of knowledge (material and digitized) will be triggered by aligning viewpoints in data organization and data access. Network researchers, in this sense, will have more opportunities to experiment new methodological approaches in their studies, as well as to understand the social contexts of artefacts and their information processing.

Taking inspiration from such reflections and examples we solicit submissions of research works dealing with

– projects aimed at developing a network perspective of galleries, archive, museums and library collections (GLAM)

– results of analysis over networks consisting of GLAM data

– methods and strategies for extracting networked data from GLAM contexts

CfP history/archaeology session at Sunbelt NetSci

Sunbelt is the main Social Network Analysis community, and NetSci is the main complex networks conference. I’ve attended these conferences since 2013 and love them both. Next year they will be held jointly, how great is that 😀 Come present in our session and let’s make it clear archaeology and history are part of network science and here to stay!

Via the HNR newsletter:

The session “Networks and the Study of the Human Past” is part of Networks 2021: a joint Sunbelt and NetSci Conference. The conference takes place in Washington D.C. on July 6-11, 2021. The organisers are planning a hybrid in-person and remote (online) conference.

You can find the session “Networks and the Study of the Human” under number 19 in the list of organized sessions for Networks 2021. Deadline for submissions is January 24, 2021.

Networks and the study of the human past 

A growing number of studies in history and archaeology have shown that network research can constructively enhance our understanding of the human past. Moreover, it is becoming clear that archaeological and historical data sources pose interesting challenges and opportunities to social network analysis and network science. How did human social networks change over huge timescales? How can old texts and material artefacts help in answering this question? The aim of this session is to present new findings and approaches within historical and archaeological network research, and promote contacts between the various disciplines that approach past phenomena using methods derived from network analysis and network science.

This session explores the challenges and potential posed by such network studies of past phenomena, including: network modelling of past phenomena; data collection from archival evidence; incomplete and missing data; computer-assisted network extraction from texts; big data analytics and semantic network analysis based on fragmented sources; material sources as proxy evidence for social phenomena; exploration of long-term changes in past systems vs. mid-term or short-term processes; etc.

The session invites contributions from various disciplines applying the methods of formal network analysis and network science to the study of the human past. We welcome submissions concerning any period, geographical area and topic, which might include but are not limited to: migration; interpersonal relations; economy; past revolutions; covert networks of the past; industrialization; transport systems; diffusion processes; kinship; conflict and conflict solving; religion and science.

Session organizers:

Julie M. Birkholz (Ghent University & Royal Library of Belgium), Tom Brughmans (Aarhus University), Marten Düring (University of Luxembourg), Ingeborg van Vugt (University of Utrecht), Martin Stark (ILS Dortmund), David Zbíral (Masaryk University)

Modelling the Roman Limes. Present in our session

There is a conference dedicated to the study of the Roman Limes, you know, that region between the Roman Empire and “the rest”. My colleagues and I love this as a study region for exploring interactions but also for the highly specialised investments by the Roman government and the impacts this had on the people living in this border zone. And of course we do this with computers.

We will host a session on this at the Limes conference which will be held 22-28 August 2021 in Nijmegen.

Do submit your work and spread the word!

Submission deadline 1 November.

31
Simulating the Limes. Challenges to computational modelling in Roman Studies

Philip Verhagen

Affiliation: Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Session Abstract: The increasing availability of large digital data sets requires archaeologists and historians to develop or adopt new analytical tools in order to detect and understand socio- economic and cultural patterns and to compare these at wider spatial and temporal scales. Simulation and other types of computational modelling are rapidly becoming a key instruments for this type of research. They are used to bridge the gap between theoretical concepts and archaeological evidence. These models can be of an exploratory nature, or attempt to closely emulate historical dynamics, and enable us to understand the mechanisms underlying, for example, e.g. population changes or economic systems.

Despite having access to large amounts of high-quality data, Roman studies have so far been relatively slow in adopting computational modelling, and Limes studies are no exception. The Limes is a particular case since each border region has its own characteristics, environmental setting, cultural background and specific relationship with the ‘core’ but also shares common features derived from being at the ‘outskirts’ of political, economic and cultural life. The interaction between these two dimensions is highly complex. Thus, the Limes constitutes an arena where formal modelling methods have particularly high potential. However, key challenges to this approach are i) the proper integration of archaeological and historical data sets; ii) a good understanding of what proxies to use, and iii) the computational power needed for modelling at larger scales.

We invite papers that showcase examples of modelling within the broader thematic setting of the Limes, taking these challenges into account. uggested topics of interest are the economy of the Limes, urbanisation and settlement dynamics, demography, military campaigns, and relationships between the Limes, the rest of the Roman Empire and the zones beyond the frontier. Statistical modelling, GIS, simulation (e.g., Agent-based modelling), network models and other types of formal approaches are all welcome. Comparative studies are especially welcomed.

Digital Classicist seminar Berlin call for papers

The next seminar series will run from October 2020 until February 2021.

Abstracts can be sent until 31 July, details below:

DIGITAL CLASSICIST SEMINAR BERLIN: CALL FOR PAPERS (EN)

We are pleased to announce the call for papers for the seventh series of the Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin, organised by the “Zentrum Grundlagenforschung Alte Welt” of the Berlin Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities together with the Berliner Antike Kolleg. The seminar will run during the winter term of the 2020/21 academic year.
We invite submissions on any kind of research that innovativly employs digital methods, resources or technologies in order to enable a better or new understanding of the ancient world. We especially encourage contributions which show how computer assisted technologies provide answers to questions intrinsic to a field of research or to questions of interdisciplinary interest.

Presentations may cover one of the following topics which make the cultural heritage accessible and deepen our understanding of it: machine learning, linked open data and the semantic web, spatial and network analysis, natural language processing, image processing and visualisation, 3D developments, techniques to be used for an open science, digital (critical) editions, and any other digital or quantitative methods. Other and new ideas are very welcome!

Abstracts of 300-500 words max. (bibliographic references excluded) should be sent by midnight (CEST) on 31 July 2020 to Markus Schnöpf (schnoepf@bbaw.de) and will be anonymized in the review process. We do accept abstracts written in English as well as in German, and the presentations can also be held in either language. When submitting the same proposal for consideration to multiple venues, please do let us know.

Seminars will run fortnightly on Tuesday evenings (16:15-17:45) from October 2020 until February 2021. The full programme will be finalised and announced in August. We endeavour to provide accommodation for the speakers and contribute towards their travel expenses.

DIGITAL CLASSICIST SEMINAR BERLIN: CALL FOR PAPERS (DE)

Wir freuen uns, hiermit den Call for Papers für die siebente Reihe des Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin im Wintersemester 2020/21 bekannt geben zu können. Diese Seminarreihe wird vom Zentrum Grundlagenforschung Alte Welt an der Berlin-Brandenburgischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Berliner Antike Kolleg durchgeführt.

Sie sind herzlich dazu eingeladen, Beiträge einzureichen, welche die innovative Anwendung moderner digitaler Methoden, Ressourcen und Techniken in den verschiedensten Bereichen einer weitgefassten Altertumswissenschaft thematisieren. Wir begrüßen insbesondere Vorschläge, aus denen hervorgeht, wie dank der Anwendung computergestützter Technologien sowohl fachimmanente als auch fachübergreifende Fragen beantwortet werden können.
Die Vorträge können beispielsweise folgende Themenbereiche zur Erschließung und dem vertieften Verständnis des kulturellen Erbes behandeln: Maschinelles Lernen, Linked Open Data und Semantic Web, Raum- und Netzwerk-Analyse, Techniken für Open Science, Bildverarbeitung und Visualisierung, 3D-Entwicklungen, moderne Editionstechniken, maschinelle Sprachverarbeitung etc. Weitere, neue Ideen sind sehr willkommen!

Vorschläge im Umfang von 300-500 Wörtern (bibliographische Angaben ausgenommen) können bis spätestens Mitternacht (MESZ) am 31. Juli 2020 an Markus Schnöpf (schnoepf@bbaw.de) gesendet werden und werden vor dem review process anonymisiert. Ihre Zusammenfassung des geplanten Vortrages kann in deutscher oder englischer Sprache eingereicht werden, die beiden Sprachen sind auch die Arbeitssprachen im Seminar. Bitte teilen Sie uns mit, ob der gleiche Vortrag bereits bei anderen Veranstaltungsreihen oder Konferenzen eingereicht wurde.

Die Seminare werden von Oktober 2020 bis Februar 2021 alle 14 Tage jeweils dienstags um 16.15-17.45 Uhr stattfinden. Das vollständige Programm wird im August bekannt gegeben werden. Die Vortragenden werden so weit wie möglich bei der Finanzierung ihrer Reise- und Unterkunftskosten unterstützt. Nähere Informationen dazu werden bei der Veröffentlichung des Programms mitgeteilt.

CFP Réseaux & Histoire, Aix-en-Provence, 21-22 octobre 2020

Via Res-Hist and HNR: the call for papers for the next Res-Hist event.

Cfp: La sixième rencontre du groupe Res-Hist (Réseaux & Histoire) “Réseaux bipartis en histoire” + training at Aix-en-Provence, 21-22 octobre 2020

Workshop

Créé en 2013, le groupe Res-Hist est un collectif destiné à favoriser les échanges scientifiques autour des réseaux en histoire. Il organise des rencontres qui réunissent, autour d’une thématique donnée, les chercheur·se·s qui mettent en œuvre des analyses de réseaux dans leurs travaux, quels que soient les périodes étudiées, les objets d’analyse, l’état d’avancement des travaux ou le niveau d’études. Ces rencontres ont permis à des spécialistes venus de différents horizons de se rencontrer et d’échanger, à la fois en termes épistémologiques, méthodologiques et techniques.

Dans le sillage des précédentes rencontres qui se sont tenues à Nice (en 2013 puis en 2016), Toulouse (2014), Paris (2015) et Rennes (2019), nous organisons la sixième rencontre du groupe Res-Hist les 21 et 22 octobre 2020 à l’Université Aix-Marseille, en partenariat avec le projet ERC ENP-China. Notre initiative est également soutenue par le GDR Analyse de réseaux en Sciences humaines et sociales. Nous proposons que les contributeurs et contributrices de ces journées discutent de la thématique suivante : « Réseaux bipartis en histoire ».

Les travaux qui mettent en œuvre l’analyse de réseau sur des sources et des objets historiques ont longtemps porté, et portent encore dans leur grande majorité, sur des réseaux dits unipartis ou unimodaux, c’est-à-dire que les liens ne concernent qu’un seul type d’acteur (souvent, seulement des personnes physiques). Or les sources font apparaître des liens entre une grande variété d’entités (individus, organisations, lieux, événements, objets matériels ou culturels, etc.) qu’il est souvent intéressant d’étudier pour elles-mêmes, sans immédiatement essayer de les transformer en un réseau uniparti. Si les réseaux bipartis sont restés en retrait dans les travaux publiés jusqu’ici, c’est d’abord parce qu’ils apparaissent plus difficiles à étudier ; en effet, les principales techniques d’analyse et les algorithmes de visualisation ont été développés pour des réseaux unipartis.

Néanmoins, depuis une vingtaine d’années, les études empiriques donnant lieu à des réseaux bipartis se sont multipliées sur des sujets très variés, comme la présence de dirigeants à des conseils d’administration (corporate interlocks), les rôles d’acteurs dans des films, la participation de scientifiques à des colloques ou la co-publication dans des revues. En parallèle, les méthodes permettant d’analyser directement les réseaux bimodaux ont connu des progrès significatifs. Ce renouvellement appelle un effort de clarification et une réflexion critique autour de ces méthodes et de leur pertinence même pour l’analyse historique. C’est précisément le but de cette sixième rencontre que de faire dialoguer des chercheur·se·s qui mobilisent, dans des perspectives variées, les réseaux bimodaux.

Dans cette optique, nous invitons à proposer des contributions qui étudient des réseaux bipartis en s’interrogeant sur les enjeux méthodologiques qu’ils soulèvent – qu’ils concernent l’extraction de l’information dans les sources, la structuration des données, ou les techniques d’analyse et de visualisation (relevant de l’analyse de réseau ou d’autres méthodes).

Selon la formule consacrée lors des précédentes journées Res-Hist, les intervenant.e.s fourniront un texte (déjà publié ou non) qui sera mis en ligne à l’avance et présenteront leurs propos oralement en 20 minutes maximum, qui seront suivies par 30 minutes de débat et d’échange avec la salle. Des présentations par des invité.e.s et des ateliers de formation à l’analyse de réseaux et à ses logiciels seront également proposés avant les rencontres.

Les propositions de communication, d’une longueur d’une page (500 à 1000 mots env.) et accompagnées des nom, statut, affiliation et adresse mail, devront être adressées avant le 15 mai 2020 par courriel à Cécile Armand (cecile.armand@gmail.com) et à Christian Henriot (christian.r.henriot@gmail.com). Elles devront présenter brièvement le contexte de la recherche, les sources et les données utilisées, la méthode proposée et les résultats attendus.

Le résultat de la sélection sera communiqué à la fin du mois de juin 2020, après examen par le conseil scientifique. Les textes présentés seront fournis avant le 15 septembre 2020.

Pour les intervenant.e.s l’organisation prendra en charge une à deux nuitées et les repas au cours de la rencontre. Les frais de transport sont à la charge des intervenant.e.s ou de leur laboratoire.
Cette initiative est possible grâce au soutien de l’ERC ENP-China (AMU), de l’Irasia (AMU), du laboratoire TELEMME (AMU), d’AMU (ALLSH) et du GDR CNRS Analyse de réseaux en SHS.

Dates à retenir :

  • 15 mai 2020 : envoi des propositions
  • Fin juin 2020 : résultats
  • 15 septembre : envoi des articles finalisés pour mise en ligne
  • 21-22 octobre : 6e rencontres Res-Hist à Aix-Marseille Université

Les rencontres Res-Hist se dérouleront du 21 octobre (après-midi) au 22 octobre (soir). Elles seront précédées de deux journées d’initiation à l’analyse de réseaux les 19-21 octobre 2020 à Aix-en-Provence (voir les détails ci-dessous et l’appel ci-joint).

Comité scientifique

Laurent Beauguitte (CNRS-GDR Analyse de réseaux en SHS)
Pierre-Yves Beaurepaire (Université Côte d’Azur, CMMC)
Francesco Beretta (CNRS, LARHRA)
Claire Bidart (CNRS, LEST)
Pierre Gervais (Université Paris 3, CREW)
Claire Lemercier (CNRS-Sciences Po Paris)
Sylvia Marzagalli (Université Côte d’Azur, CMMC)

Comité d’organisation

Cécile Armand, Université Aix-Marseille (IrAsia)
Xavier Daumalin, Université Aix-Marseille (TELEMME)
Julien Dubouloz, Université Aix-Marseille (Centre Camille Julian)
Christian Henriot, Université Aix-Marseille (IrAsia)

Initiation (gratuite) à l’analyse de réseaux (19-21 octobre)

Cette formation est proposée par le groupement de recherche Analyse de réseaux en SHS, en collaboration avec le groupe Réseaux et Histoire. Elle se déroulera sur deux jours : elle débutera le 19 octobre après-midi et se terminera le 21 octobre à midi.

Cette formation s’adresse à toute personne engagée dans une démarche de recherche en SHS et souhaitant s’initier à l’analyse de réseaux (doctorant.e.s, IE, IR, MCF, etc.). Aucun prérequis n’est attendu.

La formation est gratuite ; le transport, l’hébergement et les repas des participant.e.s ne sont pas pris en charge. Le nombre de participant.e.s est limité à 20.

  • Date limite d’envoi des candidatures (2 pages comprenant un cv court et une lettre de motivation) : 31 mai 2020.
  • Date d’envoi des réponses aux candidat.e.s : 30 juin 2020

 

Training

En lien avec les sixièmes rencontres Res-Hist qui se tiendront à Aix-en-Provence les 21-22 octobre 2020, le groupement de recherche Analyse de réseaux en SHS, en collaboration avec le groupe Réseaux et Histoire, organise deux journées de formation à Aix-en-Provence les 19-21 octobre 2020. Cette formation débutera le 19 octobre après-midi et se terminera le 21 octobre à midi.Elle s’adresse à toute personne engagée dans une démarche de recherche en SHS et souhaitant s’initier à l’analyse de réseaux (doctorant.e.s, IE, IR, MCF, etc.). Aucun prérequis n’est attendu.La formation est gratuite ; le transport, l’hébergement et les repas des participant.e.s ne sont pas pris en charge. Le nombre de participant.e.s est limité à 20.Date limite d’envoi des candidatures (2 pages comprenant un cv court et une lettre de motivation) : 31 mai 2020.Date d’envoi des réponses aux candidat.e.s : 30 juin 2020

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