Funded PhD, Lausanne, document analysis and digital humanities/classics

A really interesting job on the boundary between classics and digital humanities. Deadline April 30 2020.

via Matteo Romanello:

The DHLAB at EPFL in association with the Institut d’archéologie et des
sciences de l’antiquité (Lausanne) invites applications for full-time,
fully-funded PhD position within the EPFL PhD program in Digital
Humanities

(https://www.epfl.ch/education/phd/programs/eddh-digital-humanities/),

working at the intersection between Computer Science and Classics.

The successful candidate will develop their own research project around the
following topics: semantic information extraction by combining text-based
and image-based methods; alignment and document analysis of scholarly
publications (19c – 21c) characterised by complex layouts and rich visual
grammars; and the development of a representation model for texts with a
complex textual tradition.

The PhD thesis will be part of the research project “How does a classical
hero die in the digital age? Using Sophocles’ Ajax to create a commentary
on commentaries” (https://mromanello.github.io/ajax-multi-commentary/),
funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) and led by Matteo
Romanello (University of Lausanne).

Profile:

– Applicants should hold a master’s degree in Computer Science or
Digital Humanities.
– Experience with natural language processing/information extraction
(including machine learning approaches to it) is mandatory. Some
familiarity with textual criticism is desirable. PhD candidates will
further develop their analytical and methodological skills by
attending the EDDH doctoral school
(https://www.epfl.ch/education/phd/programs/eddh-digital-humanities/).
– Fluent English; French and/or Ancient Greek/Latin is an asset. The
dissertation can be written in English or French.
– Interest in working in a collaborative, interdisciplinary and
international environment.
– Candidates of all nationalities are invited to apply; applications
from women are especially welcome.

What we offer:

– workplace: EPFL/UNIL campus

Starting date: 1st October 2020
Duration: 4 years
Supervisors: Matteo Romanello (UNIL) and Frederic Kaplan (EPFL)
Terms of employment: Fixed-term at 100% work rate. EPFL offers
internationally competitive salaries and generous research support.
Deadline for applications: April 30, 2020

Contact: For questions and/or expressions of interest, contact Matteo
Romanello matteo.romanello@epfl.ch

How to apply: via EPFL doctoral school online application
(https://isa.epfl.ch/imoniteur_ISAP/!farforms.htm?x=edoc) (please note that
only completed applications will be reviewed). For further information
about applying for a PhD at EPFL see PhD admission criteria & application
(https://www.epfl.ch/education/admission/admission-2/phd-admission-criteria-and-
application/).

[Online at https://go.epfl.ch/phd-dhlab-ambizione]

Three DH postdocs in Madrid

Readers of this blog might be interested in these three postdoc jobs on digital humanities, linked open data and software engineering. The posts are based in the POSTDATA ERC project in Madrid.

Deadline 9 December!

3 job openings at POSTDATA

We are pleased to offer 3 Digital Humanities positions in Madrid, for the European Project ERC-Stg-2015 POSTDATA: “Poetry Standardization and Linked Open Data”, led by Elena González-Blanco, which will last until April 2021.
 
Candidates will work in an interdisciplinary environment at UNED in Madrid:

Research Software Engineer (Digital Humanities): https://euraxess.ec.europa.eu/jobs/460131 

Postdoctoral Researcher in Digital Humanities (background in Philology/Literature/Computational Linguistics): https://euraxess.ec.europa.eu/jobs/460144

Research Fellow in Ontologies and Linked Open Data (Digital Humanities): https://euraxess.ec.europa.eu/jobs/460150

Applications should be submitted no later than December 9th 2021. Reviews will continue until positions are filled. 

Cambridge Cultural Heritage Data School

Applications now open for the first Cambridge Cultural Heritage Data School 

Cambridge Digital Humanities (CDH) is pleased to announce that applications for its Cultural Heritage Data School are now open. This event aims to bring together participants from the wider Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM) sector and academia to explore the methods used to create, visualise and analyse digital archives and collections.

The curriculum will be structured around the digital collections and archives pipeline, covering the general principles and applied practices involved in the generation, exploration, visualisation, analysis and preservation of digital collections and archives. The school will be tailored to the learning needs of participants with content selected from but not limited to the following:

  • Metadata creation and enrichment
  • Digital text mark-up and TEI
  • Text-mining
  • Social network visualisation and analysis
  • Geomapping and archival photography
  • Digital Images and machine learning
  • Digital data preservation

The 2020 Data School teaching team includes:

  • Dr Anne Alexander (Director of Learning, CDH; Ethics of Big Data Research Group, University of Cambridge)
  • Dr Hugo Leal (Coordinator of the Cambridge Data Schools; CDH Methods Fellow; Research Associate, CRASSH, University of Cambridge)
  • Dr Oliver Dunn (CDH Methods Fellow; Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Faculty of History)
  • Dr Huw Jones (Library Digital Humanities Coordinator, CDH Lab)

Cambridge Digital Humanities is committed to democratising access to digital methods and tools and is
offering the following subsidised participation fees to encourage applications from those who do not normally have access to this type of training. The fees include all teaching costs, college accommodation (including breakfast and evening meals) for four nights and three lunches.

  • Standard Rate: £645
  • Small Organisations / Academic Staff: £395
  • Students / Unemployed / Community Projects / Unfunded Projects: £125

In addition, a small number of bursaries are available to those who can demonstrate financial need.
The deadline for applications is Sunday 15 December 2019. Applicants will be notified of the outcome of their application by Friday 17 January 2020.

Apply here
Questions related to the application procedure: Karen Herbane (Digital Humanities Learning and Events Coordinator): learning@cdh.cam.ac.uk Questions related to course content: Hugo Leal (Cambridge Data Schools Coordinator): hjl51@cam.ac.uk.

Event: digital approaches to research, Aarhus 30 October

Aarhus University in Denmark has recently seen the creation of a Centre for Digital History and the SDAM group (Social Dynamics in the Ancient Mediterranean, with loads of interest in networks). These initiatives are the driving forces behind the first in what I feel might be a series of international activities we can expect from them on the topic of digital approach in the humanities and social sciences.

Check out the program pasted below and register here!

When? 30 October 2019

Where? Aarhus University

Digital Approaches to Research in Humanities and Social Sciences 

30 October 2019, Aarhus University, building 1485, room 226

Session 1 – “Research standards and collaboration” 9:15 – 9:30 Icebreaker activity

9:30 – 9:55 Trust but verify: implications of the reproducibility crisis on technology and practice in HASS disciplines

Shawn Ross

9:55 – 10:20 Lessons learned from Data Analysis projects in Natural Language Processing with Japanese and Security Studies data – Shell Scripts, Jupyter Notebooks, and the value of doctests

Brian Ballsun-Stanton

10:20 – 10:45 Epigraphy.info and the Distributed Text Services. Collaboration with standards

Pietro Liuzzo

10:45 – 11:00 – Coffee break

Session 2 – “The realities of digital research”

11:00 – 11:25 Raising the dead; technical implications

Katrine Frøkjær Baunvig

11:25 – 11:50 DISSINET experiences and challenges in transforming history into spatial and network data

Tomáš Hampejs, Adam Mertel

11:50 – 12:15 Some challenges to coordinated, collaborative, and cross-cultural ethnographic work

Benjamin Purzycki

12:15 – 12:40 Social media data triangulation – The Danish HPV controversy as an example Marie

Louise Tørring

12:40 – 13:30 – Lunch

Session 3 – “Social Dynamics in the Ancient Mediterranean research group showcase”

13:30 – 13:45 Petrified voices: the evolution of the Graeco-Roman epigraphic production in space and time

Petra Heřmánková

13:45 – 14:00 Social dynamics in the ancient Mediterranean and the cultural evolution of moralizing religions: a text-mining approach

Vojtěch Kaše

14:00 – 14:15 Analysis with graph representation of complex networks in R: the case of Group of Twenty countries

Antonio Rivero Ostoic

14:15 – 14:30 Small data – Big Challenges: the goals and mission of the SDAM project

Adela Sobotkova

14:30 – 15:00 – Coffee break

15:00 – 16:00 “eResearch speed dating!” social activity & un-conference

Jobs: digital humanities research associates Florence

The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies seeks two Digital
Humanities Research Associates to join a research group working on semantically
enriched digital publications and historical spatio-temporal data.  Applicants
should have a background in Cultural Heritage Informatics and have experience in
semantic web technologies and standards (RDF, SPARQL, OWL), including data
modeling and transformation, preferably with the CIDOC-CRM and related
ontologies. Software development experience in Java and web application
development (Javascript, HTML5 etc.) highly preferred. Research Associates will
collaborate with humanities scholars and other Digital Humanities researchers to
implement a wide range of digital projects, including 3D reconstructions,
geospatial mapping of historical data, and the building of knowledge graphs from
scholarly publications and archival documents.

Terms
The appointment is for one year, renewable up to three. The stipend is $5,000
per month, plus a one-time supplement (maximum, $1,500) towards relocation
expenses. DH Research Associates are also offered lunch five days a week, the
computer hardware of their choice, as well as reimbursement for travel to
conferences where they represent institutional projects.

Eligibility
Applicants must be fluent in English. A PhD or Master’s degree in computer
science, library science, data science or other fields relevant to Digital
Humanities research is preferred.

Application
Applicants should upload their CV and a cover letter outlining their research
interests and past experience. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis
and the positions will remain open until they are filled.

Click here to apply (http://itatti.harvard.edu/digital-humanities-research-
associate)

Funding for network analysis and art history project workshops

A new call for projects on network analysis and art history, to receive funding to prepare two week-long meetings in summer 2019 and 2020, and monthly virtual meetings. Funding will be provided for successful teams. Apply before 15 October!

Call for Participation

Workshop Schedule
One-week convening, July 29–August 2, 2019
Monthly virtual convenings, Fall–Spring 2019–2020
Two-week convening, June 22–July 3, 2020


The NA+DAH Workshop is a Getty Foundation-supported event that will bring together art historians, network scientists, and digital humanists to advance research at the intersection of these fields.

Directed by Alison Langmead (University of Pittsburgh), Anne Helmreich (Texas Christian University), and Scott B. Weingart (Carnegie Mellon University)—all scholars engaged with digital art history and network analysis—the Network Analysis + Digital Art History Workshop will unfold over a full year and will be framed by two face-to-face convenings held at the University of Pittsburgh, a schedule that will allow participants to learn advanced digital methods and project management skills while fostering a close-knit interdisciplinary community. By the end of the Workshop, participants will have the expertise and support structure needed to conduct sophisticated research and build advanced projects at the intersection of network analysis and art history.

The NA+DAH workshop will welcome up to eight project teams (representing art historical, technical, and analytic expertise) for a series of in-person and video convenings, with the expectation that teams will also be working and collaborating outside the convening framework to develop and advance their research projects. It is expected that this Getty Advanced Topics in Digital Art History Workshop will lead to a significant body of research and we anticipate a potential edited volume or online repository to share its results.

Event Descriptions
Convening 1: The week-long “Digital Art History + Network Science Institute” will take place from Monday, July 29–Friday, August 2, 2019. During this Institute, participating teams will engage with the grand challenges in digital art history and network analysis, and propose and structure a year-long research agenda (guided by expert facilitators) that uses network analysis to advance art historical inquiry. Potential research topics include museum provenance, exhibition histories, stylistic similarities, and the history of the art market. Teams should begin working on their data and approaches in advance of the event, as the convening will focus on aligning data with project research agendas. Up to three members per team will be supported to attend this convening.

Between Summer 2019 and Summer 2020, the teams will continue to advance their research agendas. Each project team will participate in monthly meetings, convened virtually, to check in on progress and identify further resources as needed. These virtual meetings and related support will be facilitated by a research assistant and augmented by the expertise of the leadership team.

Convening 2: The two-week-long “Co-Working Institute in Art History + Network Science” will take place from Monday June 22–Friday, July 3, 2020. This event will include a rigorous daily agenda consisting of continued training opportunities focused on the exact needs of the teams and current problems in the field, ample project work time, and daily keynote lectures by interdisciplinary experts that offer a larger, field-wide picture. Up to four members per team will be supported to attend this convening.

To Apply
We encourage scholars to apply who are either already engaged in digital art history and wish to work with network analytic approaches in more depth, or who are engaged in network science and seek to understand better how their expertise might be applied to art historical problems. Early, mid, and later-career academic scholars are all welcome to apply, as are teams that include art museum professionals, librarians, advanced graduate students, and others. Teams of at least three that are already formed will receive priority consideration, particularly those demonstrating a pre-existing breadth of technical and art historical expertise. Individual scholars with a project in mind, but who are not yet affiliated with a team, are encouraged to contact the workshop organizers (na-dah@pitt.edu) early to seek assistance in finding potential collaborators with whom they can apply.

Members of the project teams (up to three participants for the 2019 Institute and four for the 2020 Co-Working Institute) will receive funding for travel to Pittsburgh, lodging, and a per diem rate for food. Additional team members may attend if self-funded.

To apply, send a 500-word project proposal, including a statement of the goals for the project, with citations as appropriate (word count is exclusive of citations), as well as a brief description of the project team (no more than 300 words per person), their expertise(s), and a CV for each team member (including links to relevant previous or current digital projects) to na-dah@pitt.edu. Applications are due October 15, 2018 and should be sent in PDF format only.

Once all the applications are reviewed, those teams advancing for final consideration will be interviewed over video conferencing between November 5–16, 2018. Acceptances will be sent by December 14, 2018.

PhD position multilayer network models for Humanities

The below PhD funding opportunity will be of interest to readers of this blog.

Dear friends and colleagues,

I would like to inform you that the University of Trento (Faculty of Mathematics) just published the call for one PhD position in the Program in Mathematics dedicated to the creation of multilayer network models for humanities.

This position is financed by the Fondazione Bruno Kessler (https://www.fbk.eu/en/) in cooperation with the ‘Sphere Project’ at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (https://sphaera.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de). Primary workplace is Trento, Italy, and secondary (some months a year) is Berlin, Germany. The required language is English.

If you look for those positions founded by the Fondazione Bruno Kessler, the call is the one numbered D here:

https://www.unitn.it/en/ateneo/1956/announcement-of-selection

The PhD is primarily supervised by Manlio de Domenico, Head of the “Complex Multilayer Network (CoMuNe)” research unit at the “Center for Information Technology” of the Fondazione Bruno Kessler

https://comunelab.fbk.eu/manlio/index.php

I would very much appreciate you spreading the news in the faculties of mathematics, computer science and similar and, please, do not hesitate to contact Manlio or me for further information.

Sincerely,

Matteo Valleriani & Manlio de Domenico

*********************************************

Prof. Dr. Matteo Valleriani

– Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

– Technische Universität, Berlin

– University of Tel Aviv, Israel

CFP Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities

gottingenI just heard about a new initiative that might be of interest to readers of this blog. All info below. There’s even a price for the best paper! Good luck!

Call for Papers: Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities

The Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities (GDDH) has established a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied to all areas of the Humanities, including Classics, Philosophy, History, Literature, Law, Languages, Social Science, Archaeology and more. The initiative is organized by the Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities (GCDH).

The dialogs will take place every Tuesday at 5pm from late April until early July 2015 in the form of 90 minute seminars. Presentations will be 45 minutes long and delivered in English, followed by 45 minutes of discussion and student participation. Seminar content should be of interest to humanists, digital humanists, librarians and computer scientists.

We invite submissions of complete papers describing research which employs digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable a better or new understanding of the Humanities, both in the past and present. Themes may include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of big and humanities-relevant data. Papers should be written in English. Successful papers will be submitted for publication as a special issue of Digital Humanities Quarterly (DHQ). Furthermore, the author(s) of the best paper will receive a prize of €500, which will be awarded on the basis of both the quality and the delivery of the paper.

A small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Full papers should be sent by March 20th to gkraft@gcdh.de in Word .docx format. There is no limitation in length but the suggested minimum is 5000 words. The full programme, including the venue of the dialogs, will be sent to you by April 1st.

For any questions, do not hesitate to contact gkraft@gcdh.de
For further information and updates, visit http://www.gcdh.de/en/events/gottingen-dialog-digital-humanities/

GDDH Board (in alphabetical order):

Camilla Di Biase-Dyson (Georg August University Göttingen)
Marco Büchler (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Jens Dierkes (Göttingen eResearch Alliance)
Emily Franzini (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Greta Franzini (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Angelo Mario Del Grosso (ILC-CNR, Pisa, Italy)
Berenike Herrmann (Georg August University Göttingen)
Péter Király (Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung mbH Göttingen)
Gabriele Kraft (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Bärbel Kröger  (Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)
Maria Moritz (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Sarah Bowen Savant (Aga Khan University, London, UK)
Oliver Schmitt (Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung mbH Göttingen)
Sree Ganesh Thotempudi (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Jörg Wettlaufer (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities & Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)
Ulrike Wuttke (Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)

This event is financially supported by the German Ministry of Education and Research (No. 01UG1509).

DH Benelux conference

dh beneluxI would not be a particularly good Belgian humanist if I were not to advertise DH events involving Belgians. So here we are: the digital humanities conference Benelux will take place 12-13 June 2014 in The Hague. Let’s all go to the low countries for this great event! More info can be found below or online.

Benelux Conference Digital Humanities 12-13 June 2014
Conference to present state of the art in digital humanities research

The first DHBenelux conference on 12- 13 June 2014 will showcase the state of the art in digital humanities – the most recent development in humanities research. For researchers already involved in digital humanities the conference will be a great opportunity to share knowledge and meet potential project partners. For those new to digital humanities the conference will provide a platform to get acquainted with both experienced and beginning researchers.

Conference programme

The conference organisers have put together an exciting programme. It focuses on all aspects of digital humanities in Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxemburg. Exchanging information is a major goal of the conference. Therefore, the conference is packed with parallel sessions and short, 15-minute presentations. The conference dinner on 12th June will be followed by a poster session. In other words: plenty of time for networking and for gaining a quick overview of the field.

Melissa Terras

Keynote speaker Professor Melissa Terras, Director of University College London, will put the conference programme in an international context. She is a leading digital humanities researcher and has been working in the field since the 1990s. She has participated in digital humanities developments from ‘virtual reality’ via ‘digital imaging’ to using computer technology to enable innovative research.

Organisation

The organising committee of DH Benelux comprises Marijn Koolen (University of Amsterdam), Mike Kestemont (University Antwerp), Karina van Dalen-Oskam (Huygens ING) and Steven Claeyssens (Koninklijke Bibliotheek, National Library of the Netherlands).

The conference venue is the KB building, which houses both the Huygens ING and the National Library. It is conveniently located right next to the Central Train Station in The Hague, a thirty-minute train ride from Schiphol airport.

The conference is in English. You can register for the conference until 1 June by means of the DHBenelux registration form.

More information
Follow us on Twitter @DHBenelux (use #DHBenelux) or send an e-mail to congres@huygens.knaw.nl

CFP Leipzig eHumanities Seminar

Screen shot 2012-05-04 at 10.55.46A reminder of the Leipzig eHumanities Seminar series call for papers, deadline 15 August.

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar established a forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net.

Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

If you have any questions please contact at seminar@e-humanities.net.

Seminar board (in alphabetical order):
• Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing Group),
• Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
• Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
• Klaus-Peter Fähnrich (Super Computing Centre),
• Christian Fandrych (German as a Foreign Language Group),
• Sabine Griese (Medieval German Studies);
• Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing),
• Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation Group),
• Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).

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