VALUE: archaeology and video games conference

valueWho says gaming can’t be serious and fun at the same time? Serious gaming in academia and education has been around for a while. But the potential of gaming for their role in archaeology education or how we paint popular pictures of the past is still under explored. VALUE promises to change that. It’s the first conference by a group of archaeologists in the Netherlands who frequently organise events on the topic. Check it out!

Deadline for submitting abstracts: 31 January 2016.

Contact: info@valueproject.nl

This conference will explore the intersections of archaeology and video games. Its aim is to bring scholars and students from archaeology, history, heritage and museum studies together with game developers and designers. The program will allow for both in-depth treatment of the topic in the form of presentations, open discussion, as well as skill transference and the establishment of new ties between academia and the creative industry.

Studies on the interface of archaeology and video games are part of a growing field. Its grassroots are located in social media and the blogosphere. Beyond social media, the intersection of archaeology and video games can make important contributions to archaeology at large. Archaeological research in and on video games can bring a range of new opportunities, such as the potential to discuss, model and illustrate archaeological theories with crowd-sourced, video game data or as a new channel for public outreach.

At the same time there is a similar upsurge of interest in using heritage and the past in video game development and design. Many creatives, particularly those working at smaller, independent companies, are actively looking to present a different, more conscious approach to interactive pasts. However, with the exception of the arena of serious gaming, the academic and industry networks are still largely unconnected.

This conference is one of the first in the world to focus on this new and exciting field of study. The conference organizers hope to show archaeologists and students how they could engage with the largely untapped medium of interactive entertainment as well as provide creatives with insights into the practice of archaeology and its unique views on the human past. Finally, we seek to provide opportunities for immediate and future collaborations between academics and developers.

Registration

If you are interested in attending the conference, please register by submitting this form. Registration is free and not mandatory – however, it will greatly assist us in properly preparing for the event and the workshops.

Preliminary Program

Monday April 4th 2016 – Presentations

9:00 – 9:30 Registration & coffee
9:30 – 10:00 Welcome
10:00 – 11:00 Theme 1: Video games in archaeological research
11:00 – 11:30 Break
11:30 – 12:30 Theme 1 (continued)
12:30 – 13:30 Lunch
13:30 – 15:00 Theme 2: The past in game development
15:00 – 15:30 Break
15:30 – 16:30 Theme 3: Bringing it to the public
16:30 – 17:00 Discussion
17:00 Drinks


Tuesday April 5th 2016 – Workshops

9:00 – 9:30 Welcome & coffee
9:30 – 11:00 Session 1: How archaeology works – translating archaeological practice and interpretation to the creative industries’ language
11:00 – 11:30 Break
11:30 – 13:00 Session 2: How games work – translating creative industries’ practice to archaeological language
13:00 – 14:00 Lunch
14:00 – 17:00 Session 3: Making archaeology and games work together
17:00 Closing & drinks

Contact/Questions

If you wish to be considered as a speaker for this conference, please send us an abstract of your presentation, latest on January 31st 2016. Abstracts should be max. 200 words. Please make sure to indicate in your email within which of the three themes your presentation would fit.

All abstracts and other queries may be directed to info@valueproject.nl

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CFP Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks 2015

AHCN2015A yearly event I always gladly advertise: it’s the Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks satellite symposium at NetScie2015! The sixth edition of this truly multidisciplinary event will take place in Zaragoza (Spain). I presented at this symposium once and can definitely recommend it. Details below.

Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks
— 6th Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci2015

taking place at the World Trade Center Zaragoza (WTCZ) in Spain,
on Tuesday, June 2, 2015.

Submission:
For submission instructions please go to:
http://artshumanities.netsci2015.net/

Deadline for submission: March 29, 2015.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by April 6, 2015.

Abstract:

For the sixth time, it is our pleasure to bring together pioneer work in the overlap of arts, humanities, network research, data science, and information design. The 2015 symposium will again follow our established recipe, leveraging interaction between those areas by means of keynotes, a number of contributions, and a high-profile panel discussion.

In our call, we are looking for a diversity of research contributions revolving around networks in culture, networks in art, networks in the humanities, art about networks, and research in network visualization. Focussing on these five pillars that have crystallized out of our previous meetings, the 2015 symposium again strives to make further impact in the arts, humanities, and natural sciences.

Running parallel to the NetSci2015 conference, the symposium provides a unique opportunity to mingle with leading researchers in complex network science, potentially sparking fruitful collaborations.

As in previous years, selected papers will be published in print, both in a Special Section of Leonardo Journal MIT-Press and in a dedicated Leonardo eBook MIT-Press (see below). – See more at: http://ahcn2015.schich.info/#sthash.ur1o5Lba.dpuf

For the sixth time, it is our pleasure to bring together pioneer work in the overlap of arts, humanities, network research, data science, and information design. The 2015 symposium will again follow our established recipe, leveraging interaction between those areas by means of keynotes, a number of contributions, and a high-profile panel discussion. In our call, we are looking for a diversity of research contributions revolving around networks in culture, networks in art, networks in the humanities, art about networks, and research in network visualization. Focusing on these five pillars that have crystallized out of our previous meetings, the 2015 symposium again strives to make further impact in the arts, humanities, and natural sciences. Running parallel to the NetSci2015 conference, the symposium provides a unique opportunity to mingle with leading researchers in complex network science, potentially sparking fruitful collaborations. As in previous years, selected papers will be published in print, both in a Special Section of Leonardo Journal and in a dedicated Leonardo eBook MIT-Press: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007S0UA9Q

Keynote:
As in previous years, we will feature a high-profile keynote from the areas of cultural data science, network visualization, and/or network art.

Best regards,
The AHCN2015 organizers,
Maximilian Schich*, Roger Malina**, and Isabel Meirelles***
artshumanities.netsci@gmail.com

*    Associate Professor, ATEC, The University of Texas at Dallas, USA
**   Executive Editor at Leonardo Publications, France/USA
***  Professor, Professor, Faculty of Design, OCAD University, Toronto, Canada

CFP Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities

gottingenI just heard about a new initiative that might be of interest to readers of this blog. All info below. There’s even a price for the best paper! Good luck!

Call for Papers: Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities

The Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities (GDDH) has established a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied to all areas of the Humanities, including Classics, Philosophy, History, Literature, Law, Languages, Social Science, Archaeology and more. The initiative is organized by the Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities (GCDH).

The dialogs will take place every Tuesday at 5pm from late April until early July 2015 in the form of 90 minute seminars. Presentations will be 45 minutes long and delivered in English, followed by 45 minutes of discussion and student participation. Seminar content should be of interest to humanists, digital humanists, librarians and computer scientists.

We invite submissions of complete papers describing research which employs digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable a better or new understanding of the Humanities, both in the past and present. Themes may include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of big and humanities-relevant data. Papers should be written in English. Successful papers will be submitted for publication as a special issue of Digital Humanities Quarterly (DHQ). Furthermore, the author(s) of the best paper will receive a prize of €500, which will be awarded on the basis of both the quality and the delivery of the paper.

A small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Full papers should be sent by March 20th to gkraft@gcdh.de in Word .docx format. There is no limitation in length but the suggested minimum is 5000 words. The full programme, including the venue of the dialogs, will be sent to you by April 1st.

For any questions, do not hesitate to contact gkraft@gcdh.de
For further information and updates, visit http://www.gcdh.de/en/events/gottingen-dialog-digital-humanities/

GDDH Board (in alphabetical order):

Camilla Di Biase-Dyson (Georg August University Göttingen)
Marco Büchler (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Jens Dierkes (Göttingen eResearch Alliance)
Emily Franzini (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Greta Franzini (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Angelo Mario Del Grosso (ILC-CNR, Pisa, Italy)
Berenike Herrmann (Georg August University Göttingen)
Péter Király (Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung mbH Göttingen)
Gabriele Kraft (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Bärbel Kröger  (Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)
Maria Moritz (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Sarah Bowen Savant (Aga Khan University, London, UK)
Oliver Schmitt (Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung mbH Göttingen)
Sree Ganesh Thotempudi (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Jörg Wettlaufer (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities & Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)
Ulrike Wuttke (Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)

This event is financially supported by the German Ministry of Education and Research (No. 01UG1509).

Digital Classicist CFP

DCI can only recommend people to attend or present at the Digital Classicist. It’s a friendly and inspiring forum for presenting the kind of work that I tend to blog about. All details about the call for papers can be found below.

The Digital Classicist London seminars provide a forum for research into the ancient world that employs innovative digital and interdisciplinary methods. The seminars are held on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London, WC1E 7HU.

We are seeking contributions from students as well as established researchers and practitioners. We welcome papers discussing individual projects and their immediate contexts, but also wish to accommodate the broader theoretical considerations of the use of digital methods in the study of the ancient world, including ancient cultures beyond the classical Mediterranean. You should expect a mixed audience of classicists, philologists, historians, archaeologists, information scientists and digital humanists, and take particular care to cater for the presence of graduate students in the audience.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of no more than 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk<mailto:s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk> by midnight GMT on March 8th, 2015.

Organised by Gabriel Bodard, Hugh Bowden, Stuart Dunn, Simon Mahony and Charlotte Tupman. Further information and details of past seminars, including several peer-reviewed publications, are available at: http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/

Most awesome city in the world hosts DHBenelux

OLV-KathedraalOf course I am referring to the amazing city of Antwerp in Belgium! It’s my home town but I don’t think that skews my perception of its awesomeness. The University of Antwerp will host the second Digital Humanities Benelux conference. DH conference are usually really inspiring due to the sheer number of topics that fall within their remit. They are particularly welcoming to PhD students and early career researchers. So I can definitely recommend attending or presenting at this event. More details below.

Conference website
Submit a paper
Deadline for submitting abstracts: Sunday 1 March 2015, 23:59 CET.

Second Call for Proposals: DHBenelux Conference, 8 & 9 June 2015, University of Antwerp

To all our colleagues in the humanities and digital humanities,

On 8 and 9 June 2015, the second DHBenelux conference will take place. The DHBenelux conference is a young initiative that strives to further the dissemination of, and collaboration between Digital Humanities projects in Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg by hosting an annual conference in various institutions throughout these countries. The conference serves as a platform for the fast growing community of DH researchers to meet, present and discuss their latest research results and to demonstrate tools and projects.

The first DHBenelux conference took place in The Hague (The Netherlands) in 2014 and was a great success, attracting an audience of over 160 participants with a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds, coming from a variety of different countries (including but not limited to the Benelux). In 2015 the conference aspires to welcome an even larger and more diverse audience.

NB: In line with the community building principles of Digital Humanities, we have attempted to tend more to gender balance and geographical spread within the Program Committee, which is the reason the PC has seen some additions with regard to the conference’s first CfP.

= Conference, Program, Venue =

The DHBenelux 2015 conference will be proudly hosted by the University of Antwerp. The conference will take place on Monday 8 and Tuesday 9 June 2015 at the University of Antwerp campus.

The DHBenelux conference welcomes contributions and participants from all areas of research and teaching in Digital Humanities. While the conference has a focus on recent advances in Belgium, The Netherlands, and Luxembourg, we do warmly welcome contributions from outside the Benelux. The language of the conference is international English. We hope that we may welcome many scholars to the European scientific meeting platform that DHBenelux will constitute in summer 2015 for the Digital Humanities.

The conference program will offer oral presentations, project presentations, poster sessions, and a demo space. Our first confirmed keynote speaker will be William Noel (http://www.willnoel.com http://www.willnoel.com/ /), Director of The Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and
Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania.

= Call =

We now invite submissions of abstracts on any aspect of digital humanities: practical experimentation, thorough theorizing, cross- and multidisciplinary work, new and relevant developments. Relevant subjects can be any of—but are not limited to—the following:

– Digital media, digitization, curation of digital objects
– Software studies, modeling, information design
– Text mining, data mining, big data & small data
– Design and application of algorithms and analyses
– Application of digital technology in literary, linguistic, cultural, and
historical studies
– Critical study of digital arts, architecture, music, film, theatre, new
media, digital games
– Social and economic aspects of digitality and digital humanities
– Stylometry, topic modeling, sentiment mining and other digital techniques
– Interfaces, augmented reality, serious gaming
– Pedagogy, teaching, and dissemination of digital humanities

We particularly encourage PhD students and junior researchers to submit abstracts. Note that this call is not limited to researchers in the Benelux. Anyone can submit an abstract.

Proposal should be at least 250 words, not exceeding 500 words. References and/or bibliography, recommended but not obligatory, are excluded from the word count. Proposals may contain graphics and illustrations. Proposals and abstracts should clearly state the title and name and affiliation of the authors and presenters. Also indicate for which category (or categories) of presentation you are submitting your proposal. Presentation categories are:

* Paper

Oral presentations on papers will be given 15 minutes presentation time and 5 minutes for Q&A. Oral presentations are well suited for presenting research methods and results, concise theoretical argument, reporting on ongoing research, project presentations, and presenting intermediate finds or theory development.

* Poster

Posters are particularly suited for detailed technical explanations and clarifications, and for the show and tell of projects and research alike. A two hour poster session is scheduled, posters may be put up for display during the entire conference.

* Demonstration

For demonstrating prototypes, finished software, hardware technology, tools, datasets, digital publications and so forth a ‘market place’ will be organized.

* Panel

If a group of researchers wishes to highlight and discuss different aspects of a larger topic in Digital Humanities together with the audience, they may propose to organize a panel. A panel session takes one hour, and will be chaired by one of the panelists — who will be responsible for finding a good balance between presentation and discussion. To apply for a panel, please submit your proposal as an ‘oral presentation’, and make it clear that you wish to organize a panel in the abstract.

Proposals may combine two presentation modes, e.g. to support the theory detailed in a paper presentation with a practical demonstration on the demo market place. Combined presentations should either consist of a paper plus demonstration, or a paper and poster. In the interest of planning we ask authors to be very careful in indicating chosen combinations of presentation modes.

To submit your proposal, please use the EasyChair facility that we have put online at: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=dhbenelux2015<https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=dhbenelux2015&gt; .

= Important dates =

Deadline for submitting abstracts: Sunday 1 March 2015, 23:59 CET.
Notification of acceptance: Sunday 15 March 2015.
Deadline for revised abstracts: Wednesday 1 April 2015.

= More information =

Please check our website at http://dhbenelux.org http://dhbenelux.org/ / for further details that will become available running up to the conference. Any additional questions and inquiries can be sent to Elli Bleeker (elli.bleeker@uantwerpen.be).

We look forward to welcoming you all in Antwerp!

Kind regards,

On behalf of the conference organizers and the program committee

–Joris van Zundert (Program Chair)

Conference Organizers:

– Elli Bleeker, University of Antwerp.

– Thomas Crombez, Royal Academy of Fine Arts & University of Antwerp.

– Walter Daelemans, University of Antwerp.

– Katrien Deroo, Ghent University.

– Wout Dillen, University of Antwerp.

– Aodhán Kelly, University of Antwerp.

– Mike Kestemont, University of Antwerp.

– Saskia Scheltjens, Ghent University.

– Joris J. van Zundert, Huygens Institute for the History of the
Netherlands.

– Ben Verhoeven, University of Antwerp.

– Dirk Van Hulle, University of Antwerp.

Program Committee (includes members of Organizing Committee):

– Joris J. van Zundert (Chair), Huygens Institute for the History of the
Netherlands

– Marijn Koolen (Vice Chair), University of Amsterdam

– Florentina Armaselu, CVCE Luxembourg

– Paul Bertrand, Université Catholique de Louvain

– Rens Bod, University of Amsterdam

– Barbara Bordalejo, KULeuven

– Steven Claeyssens, Royal Library, The Hague

– Sally Chambers, Ghent University

– Seza Doğruöz, Tilburg University

– Seth Van Hooland, Université Libre de Bruxelles

– Catherine Emma Jones, CVCE Luxembourg

– Folgert Karsdorp, Meertens Institute

– Anne Roekens, Université de Namur

– Els Stronks, Utrecht University

– Karina van Dalen-Oskam, University of Amsterdam & Huygens Institute
for the History of the Netherlands

– Antal van den Bosch, Radboud University Nijmegen

– Nicoline van der Sijs, Radboud University Nijmegen

– Christophe Verbruggen, Ghent University

– Lars Wieneke, CVCE Luxembourg

Hestia2 videos on Youtube

hestiaA while ago we at The Connected Past co-organised an event in Southampton called ‘Hestia2: exploring spatial networks through ancient source’. I published a review of the event on this blog before, read it here. We managed to record quite a few talks presented during this event. But this was not the only Hestia2 conference: there were four in total and most talks were recorded. You can now access all videos of the Hestia2 events on our Youtube channel. The topics of the videos are very diverse, with something on every aspect of Digital Classics represented. If you like this blog, then you WILL find something of interest in the Hestia2 Youtube channel 🙂

Click here for the Hestia2 Youtube channel.

More info on Hestia2.

DH Benelux conference

dh beneluxI would not be a particularly good Belgian humanist if I were not to advertise DH events involving Belgians. So here we are: the digital humanities conference Benelux will take place 12-13 June 2014 in The Hague. Let’s all go to the low countries for this great event! More info can be found below or online.

Benelux Conference Digital Humanities 12-13 June 2014
Conference to present state of the art in digital humanities research

The first DHBenelux conference on 12- 13 June 2014 will showcase the state of the art in digital humanities – the most recent development in humanities research. For researchers already involved in digital humanities the conference will be a great opportunity to share knowledge and meet potential project partners. For those new to digital humanities the conference will provide a platform to get acquainted with both experienced and beginning researchers.

Conference programme

The conference organisers have put together an exciting programme. It focuses on all aspects of digital humanities in Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxemburg. Exchanging information is a major goal of the conference. Therefore, the conference is packed with parallel sessions and short, 15-minute presentations. The conference dinner on 12th June will be followed by a poster session. In other words: plenty of time for networking and for gaining a quick overview of the field.

Melissa Terras

Keynote speaker Professor Melissa Terras, Director of University College London, will put the conference programme in an international context. She is a leading digital humanities researcher and has been working in the field since the 1990s. She has participated in digital humanities developments from ‘virtual reality’ via ‘digital imaging’ to using computer technology to enable innovative research.

Organisation

The organising committee of DH Benelux comprises Marijn Koolen (University of Amsterdam), Mike Kestemont (University Antwerp), Karina van Dalen-Oskam (Huygens ING) and Steven Claeyssens (Koninklijke Bibliotheek, National Library of the Netherlands).

The conference venue is the KB building, which houses both the Huygens ING and the National Library. It is conveniently located right next to the Central Train Station in The Hague, a thirty-minute train ride from Schiphol airport.

The conference is in English. You can register for the conference until 1 June by means of the DHBenelux registration form.

More information
Follow us on Twitter @DHBenelux (use #DHBenelux) or send an e-mail to congres@huygens.knaw.nl

Hestia2 in Stanford: visualising complex data

Hestia_logo_whtRemember the Hestia2 event we organised in Southampton in July with The Connected Past? Time for more of that! The Hestia project is pleased to announce its second community event, which will take place at Stanford University on 4-5 November 2013. The two-day workshop, hosted by Stanford’s Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis, will tackle the issue of visualizing complex data, and will be of interest to anyone working on network theory and the digital analysis of literature and historical material.

It will include presentations from various local high-tech companies developing complex data analysis and hands-on work with the following humanities projects based in Stanford:
Orbis 2.0, the latest geospatial network model of the ancient world;
Arches, a new open-source geospatial software system for cultural heritage inventory and management;
– Palladio, a new platform for visualizing and analyzing networks of historical data;
– Topotime, a new data model and graphical layout designed specifically to handle the fuzzy temporal bounds and cyclical time of literary narratives.

This two-day event is free for all. We simply ask you to register in advance here.

For more information about the event and about Hestia, please visit our blog.

We look forward to welcoming you in Stanford!

Best wishes

The Hestia2 team

**Hestia2 is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council**

Leipzig e-Humanities autumn/winter schedule

Screen shot 2012-05-04 at 10.55.46Plenty of good academic messages being spread from Leipzig this season! Have a look at the Leipzig e-humanities website or see the schedule below.

Seminar Schedule

Oct 23 Eric Champion Interacting With History Using Virtual Environments pdfAbstract
Oct 30 Gabriel Bodard Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies: Digital Classics, Linked Open Data, and community building pdfAbstract
Nov 6 Matthew Munson “You will know a word by its changes in company!”: Using Collocation Analysis to Track Semantic Drift in Biblical Greek pdfAbstract
Nov 13 Francesco Mambrini Topic-Focus articulation à la praguienne: Annotating information structure in the Ancient Greek Dependency Treebank pdfAbstract
Nov 27 Michael Hendry Every Reader an Editor:Putting Editable and Formattable Critical Texts On-Line with SQL pdfAbstract
Dec 4 Matt Coler Correlating Human Sensory Experience with Physical Phenomena Using Dependency Structures, Cognitive Semantics, and (Semi-)Automatic Linguistic Analysis: Bridging the gap between the objective world and subjective reality pdfAbstract
Dec 11 Giovanni Colavizza Functional Categorization for Historical Place Types pdfAbstract
Dec 18 Amir Zeldes Corpus Linguistics Tools for Sahidic Coptic pdfAbstract
Paul Arthur Online Environments for Biographical Research
Jan 8 Frank Binder From Collaborative Data Editing to Library Catalogues: Towards a ‘Sharable Data Strategy’ for the GeoBib Project pdfAbstract
Jan 15 Mike Kestemont A Distant Reading of a Distant Past: Computational Text Analysis and Medieval Literature pdfAbstract
Jan 22 Toma Tasovac Historic Dictionaries as a Challenge for Digital Humanities pdfAbstract
Jan 29 Sarah Savant Al-Thaʿālibī’s Memorable Thimār al-qulūb fī almuḍāf wa-l-mansūb: A Portrait of an Eleventh-Century Cultural Broker pdfAbstract

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