CFP Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities

gottingenI just heard about a new initiative that might be of interest to readers of this blog. All info below. There’s even a price for the best paper! Good luck!

Call for Papers: Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities

The Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities (GDDH) has established a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied to all areas of the Humanities, including Classics, Philosophy, History, Literature, Law, Languages, Social Science, Archaeology and more. The initiative is organized by the Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities (GCDH).

The dialogs will take place every Tuesday at 5pm from late April until early July 2015 in the form of 90 minute seminars. Presentations will be 45 minutes long and delivered in English, followed by 45 minutes of discussion and student participation. Seminar content should be of interest to humanists, digital humanists, librarians and computer scientists.

We invite submissions of complete papers describing research which employs digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable a better or new understanding of the Humanities, both in the past and present. Themes may include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of big and humanities-relevant data. Papers should be written in English. Successful papers will be submitted for publication as a special issue of Digital Humanities Quarterly (DHQ). Furthermore, the author(s) of the best paper will receive a prize of €500, which will be awarded on the basis of both the quality and the delivery of the paper.

A small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Full papers should be sent by March 20th to gkraft@gcdh.de in Word .docx format. There is no limitation in length but the suggested minimum is 5000 words. The full programme, including the venue of the dialogs, will be sent to you by April 1st.

For any questions, do not hesitate to contact gkraft@gcdh.de
For further information and updates, visit http://www.gcdh.de/en/events/gottingen-dialog-digital-humanities/

GDDH Board (in alphabetical order):

Camilla Di Biase-Dyson (Georg August University Göttingen)
Marco Büchler (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Jens Dierkes (Göttingen eResearch Alliance)
Emily Franzini (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Greta Franzini (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Angelo Mario Del Grosso (ILC-CNR, Pisa, Italy)
Berenike Herrmann (Georg August University Göttingen)
Péter Király (Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung mbH Göttingen)
Gabriele Kraft (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Bärbel Kröger  (Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)
Maria Moritz (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Sarah Bowen Savant (Aga Khan University, London, UK)
Oliver Schmitt (Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung mbH Göttingen)
Sree Ganesh Thotempudi (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Jörg Wettlaufer (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities & Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)
Ulrike Wuttke (Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)

This event is financially supported by the German Ministry of Education and Research (No. 01UG1509).

Leipzig e-Humanities autumn/winter schedule

Screen shot 2012-05-04 at 10.55.46Plenty of good academic messages being spread from Leipzig this season! Have a look at the Leipzig e-humanities website or see the schedule below.

Seminar Schedule

Oct 23 Eric Champion Interacting With History Using Virtual Environments pdfAbstract
Oct 30 Gabriel Bodard Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies: Digital Classics, Linked Open Data, and community building pdfAbstract
Nov 6 Matthew Munson “You will know a word by its changes in company!”: Using Collocation Analysis to Track Semantic Drift in Biblical Greek pdfAbstract
Nov 13 Francesco Mambrini Topic-Focus articulation à la praguienne: Annotating information structure in the Ancient Greek Dependency Treebank pdfAbstract
Nov 27 Michael Hendry Every Reader an Editor:Putting Editable and Formattable Critical Texts On-Line with SQL pdfAbstract
Dec 4 Matt Coler Correlating Human Sensory Experience with Physical Phenomena Using Dependency Structures, Cognitive Semantics, and (Semi-)Automatic Linguistic Analysis: Bridging the gap between the objective world and subjective reality pdfAbstract
Dec 11 Giovanni Colavizza Functional Categorization for Historical Place Types pdfAbstract
Dec 18 Amir Zeldes Corpus Linguistics Tools for Sahidic Coptic pdfAbstract
Paul Arthur Online Environments for Biographical Research
Jan 8 Frank Binder From Collaborative Data Editing to Library Catalogues: Towards a ‘Sharable Data Strategy’ for the GeoBib Project pdfAbstract
Jan 15 Mike Kestemont A Distant Reading of a Distant Past: Computational Text Analysis and Medieval Literature pdfAbstract
Jan 22 Toma Tasovac Historic Dictionaries as a Challenge for Digital Humanities pdfAbstract
Jan 29 Sarah Savant Al-Thaʿālibī’s Memorable Thimār al-qulūb fī almuḍāf wa-l-mansūb: A Portrait of an Eleventh-Century Cultural Broker pdfAbstract

CFP Leipzig eHumanities Seminar

Screen shot 2012-05-04 at 10.55.46A reminder of the Leipzig eHumanities Seminar series call for papers, deadline 15 August.

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar established a forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net.

Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

If you have any questions please contact at seminar@e-humanities.net.

Seminar board (in alphabetical order):
• Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing Group),
• Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
• Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
• Klaus-Peter Fähnrich (Super Computing Centre),
• Christian Fandrych (German as a Foreign Language Group),
• Sabine Griese (Medieval German Studies);
• Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing),
• Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation Group),
• Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).

CFP Leipzig eHumanities seminar

Screen shot 2012-05-04 at 10.55.46Leipzig is lovely (in the summer even more so than in the winter). Above all, there are some great digital humanists there. The call for papers of the Leipzig eHumanities seminar series is out for this season. I can definitely recommend the venue, good discussions guaranteed.

Deadline for abstracts is August 15th. More info below:

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar establishes a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

If you have any questions please contact at seminar@e-humanities.net.

 

Seminar board (in alphabetical order):

  • Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing Group),
  • Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
  • Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
  • Klaus-Peter Fähnrich (Super Computing Centre),
  • Christian Fandrych (German as a Foreign Language Group),
  • Sabine Griese (Medieval German Studies);
  • Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing),
  • Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation Group),
  • Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).

Leipzig eHumanities on a roll!

I visited Marco Büchler and his colleagues at eHumanities in Leipzig in February (read my report on this visit here) but had no idea of all the exciting developments to emerge there soon after. Their centre of eHumanities is on a roll!

It was recently announced that Professor Greg Crane, pioneer in the Digital Humanities and the person behind the hugely successful (and above all useful) Perseus Digital Library, has been appointed Humboldt Professor in Leipzig. With Professor Crane in such a prestigious and well-funded position I am quite sure we can expect to hear great things from the Leipzig eHumanities team.

In fact, I heard of two new initiatives already: the Leipzig eHumanities seminar and the eHumanities innovation award. The first will take place every Wednesday between October and November. See the call for submissions below. The second aims to recognise “emerging researchers who have developed new automated methods for the analysis of Humanities content”. They emphasise that they are not looking for scholars who applied existing methods to digital data, but instead want to uncover real methodological innovations that are useful for the Humanities. See the call for proposals below.

I am sure that Marco, Greg and everyone at eHumanities in Leipzig have great plans and I cannot think of a better team to bring this to a good end. I am very much looking forward for future news from Leipzig!

eHumanities seminar call for submissions:

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar establishes a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (16:30 – 19:00) from October to November at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in a printed volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by June, 15th, 2012 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of July.

If you have any questions please contact at seminar@e-humanities.net.

Seminar board (in alphabetical order):
Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing),
Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing,
Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation),
Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).

eHumanities innovation award:

The eHumanities Innovation Award recognizes emerging researchers who have developed new automated methods for the analysis of Humanities content. We particularly look for research that involves a deep understanding of issues from both the Humanities and from the Information Sciences. Individual researchers may thus be primarily centered in the Humanities or in the Information Sciences but we also invite work that involves collaboration across these boundaries.

Your proposal should clarify the following points:
How does your methodology/technique work? Explain and discuss here in detail not only the technique you propose, but also the distinguishing features of your approach.
Which benefits does your method provide for the humanities? Please explain in detail how your method is used in any field of the humanities? Do not forget to provide good examples.
What are the next steps for your research process?

We are not interested in a combination of digital data with previously available tools or visualization techniques.

Who can apply?
This award focuses on researchers who have received their PhD’s within the previous 5 years or are still working on the PhD.

Procedure:
Send a proposal abstract until July, 31st, 2012.
After reviewing, the participants with the 5 most interesting contributions will be asked to present both data and results of their submissions (early September 2012).
Finally, the winner and two notable mentions will be announced by September 30th, 2012.

The winner will receive a 1000 Euro award and will be invited to the 2012 Leipzig eHumanities Seminar to present the contribution.

Please send an anonymized proposal of no more than 1.500 words by July, 31st, 2012 to award@e-humanities.net.

If you have any questions please contact us at award@e-humanities.net.

Award board (in alphabetical order):
Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing),
Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing,
Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation),
Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).

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