PhD position multilayer network models for Humanities

The below PhD funding opportunity will be of interest to readers of this blog.

Dear friends and colleagues,

I would like to inform you that the University of Trento (Faculty of Mathematics) just published the call for one PhD position in the Program in Mathematics dedicated to the creation of multilayer network models for humanities.

This position is financed by the Fondazione Bruno Kessler (https://www.fbk.eu/en/) in cooperation with the ‘Sphere Project’ at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (https://sphaera.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de). Primary workplace is Trento, Italy, and secondary (some months a year) is Berlin, Germany. The required language is English.

If you look for those positions founded by the Fondazione Bruno Kessler, the call is the one numbered D here:

https://www.unitn.it/en/ateneo/1956/announcement-of-selection

The PhD is primarily supervised by Manlio de Domenico, Head of the “Complex Multilayer Network (CoMuNe)” research unit at the “Center for Information Technology” of the Fondazione Bruno Kessler

https://comunelab.fbk.eu/manlio/index.php

I would very much appreciate you spreading the news in the faculties of mathematics, computer science and similar and, please, do not hesitate to contact Manlio or me for further information.

Sincerely,

Matteo Valleriani & Manlio de Domenico

*********************************************

Prof. Dr. Matteo Valleriani

– Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

– Technische Universität, Berlin

– University of Tel Aviv, Israel

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Evolution of cultural complexity CFP

I can strongly recommend submitting a proposal to this satellite session as well as attending the conference on complex systems. I went to the previous iteration and it was an inspiring event. Submit you abstract by 1 June 2018! Archaeological papers and network research will be very welcome.

We are pleased to announce a call for abstracts for our session on “Evolution of Cultural Complexity” at the annual “Conference on Complex System”. The Conference on Complex System will takes place this year in Thessaloniki, Greece, from the 23rd to the 27th of September. The satellites will take place between the 26th and 27th of September 2018.

Human sociocultural evolution has been documented throughout the history of humans and earlier hominins. This evolution manifests itself through development from tools as simple as a rock used to break nuts, to something as complex as a spaceship able to land man on other planets. Equally, we have witnessed evolution of human population towards complex multilevel social organisation.
Although cases of decrease and loss of this type of complexity have been reported, in global terms it tends to increase with time. Despite its significance, the conditions and the factors driving this increase are still poorly understood and subject to debate. Different hypothesis trying to explain the rise of sociocultural complexity in human societies have been proposed (demographic factor, cognitive component, historical contingency…) but so far no consensus has been reached.
Here we raise a number of questions:

1.
Can we better define sociocultural complexity and confirm its general tendency to increase over the course of human history?
2.
What are the main factors enabling an increase of cultural complexity?
3.
Are there reliable way to measure the complexity in material culture and social organisation constructs, that is?
4.
How can we quantify and compare the impact of different factors?
5.
What causes a loss of cultural complexity in a society? And how often these losses occurred in the past?

In this satellite meeting we want to bring together a community of researchers coming from different scientific domains and interested in different aspect of the evolution of social and cultural complexity. From archaeologists, to linguists, social scientists, historians and artificial intelligence specialists – the topic of sociocultural complexity transgresses traditional discipline boundaries. We want to establish and promote a constructive dialogue incorporating different perspectives: theoretical as well as empirical approaches, research based on historical and archaeological sources, as well as actual evidences and contemporary theories.

Submissions will be made by sending an abstract in PDF (maximum 250 words) via Easychair here: https://ccs18.bsc.es/call/ . The deadline for abstract submission is on the 1st of June 2018. The contributions to this satellite will be evaluated by the scientific committee through a peer review process that will evaluate the scientific quality and the relevance to the goal of this session. Notification of accepted abstracts will be communicated as soon as possible.

Please find more details on the following website: https://ccs18.bsc.es/
We strongly encourage you to participate

Spread the word

Simon Carrignon and Sergi Valverde

Barcelona summer school in digital archaeology (after EAA)

Want to get expert training on computational methods for archaeological research, by specialists, in sunny Barcelona? Come to the…

Summer school in digital archaeology

10-14 September 2018, Barcelona (immediately following EAA)

The Summer School in Digital Archaeology will provide comprehensive training in agent-based modelling, network science, semantic technology, and research software development for archaeological research. It will take place in Barcelona between 10-14 September 2018 immediately after the Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA2018). Pre-register online now! A large number of bursaries to support registration costs are available.

More information and a preliminary programme can be found on our website:

https://digitalarchacademy.wordpress.com

Information about how to pre-register can be found here:

https://digitalarchacademy.wordpress.com/registration-fees-and-bursaries/

All pre-registrations received before 1 April 2018 will be considered for bursaries!

Hope to see you in Barcelona!

Event sponsored by: Complex Systems Society, Barcelona Supercomputing Centre, Complexity Lab Barcelona, Roman EPNet, Siris Academic, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Universitat de Barcelona

Summer_school

Historical Network Research conference 2018 Brno

The HNR conference series is in its fifth edition now. It’s a great event and a perfect venue for presenting archaeological network research as well.

CFP Deadline 31 March

More info on the conference website and below.

Historical Network Research Conference 2018

Masaryk University, Brno, the Czech Republic

10th September 2018 (pre-conference tutorials and workshops)

11th-13th September 2018 (conference)

Organizing institutions

• Historical Network Research ( http://www.historicalnetworkresearch.org)

• Department for the Study of Religions ( http://religionistika.phil.muni.cz/en/)

• Czech Association for the Study of Religions ( http://www.casr.cz/indexen.php)

Program Committee

• Dr. Aleš Chalupa (Masaryk University)

• Dr. Kimmo Elo (University of Helsinki)

• Dr. Ivo Veiga (New University of Lisbon)

• Dr. Martin Stark (ILS – Research Institute for Regional and Urban Development)

• Dr. David Zbíral (Masaryk University)

Call For Papers

The Historical Network Research group is pleased to announce its 5th annual conference. After the previous conferences that which took place in Hamburg in 2013, Ghent in 2014, Lisbon in 2015, and Turku in 2017, the 5th conference will be hosted by Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic, on 10th-13th September 2018. The 5th Historical Network Research Conference seeks to foster historians’ awareness of the possibilities of network research and create opportunities for sharing cross- and multidisciplinary approaches to the networked past by bringing together historians, social scientists and computer scientists. The organizers welcome proposals for papers discussing any historical period and geographical area. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

• Social network analysis in historical research

• Network analysis in archaeology

• Network analysis and text mining in historical research

• Modeling diffusion on historical networks

• Modeling and simulation in historical research

• Religious networks

• Cultural and intellectual networks

• Networks in economic and business history

• Technological and research networks, scientific networks and collaborations

• Social movements and political mobilization

• Social networks in war, conflict, and peacemaking

• Methodological and theoretical issues of the network analysis in historical research

The language of the conference is English. There is no conference fee. Those who wish to participate in the optional social event on 12th September 2018 will be asked for a contribution of 25 € (625 CZK) collected at the registration desk during the conference.

The deadline for submissions of abstracts is 31st March 2018. All abstracts are to be submitted through the form in the Registration section. We kindly ask prospective participants without papers to register as well.

The presentations for the conference will be selected, after a peer review process, on the basis of abstracts. Notifications of acceptance/rejection will be announced in the second half of April 2018.

The list of pre-conference tutorials and workshops will be announced in the second half of April 2018. After the announcement, the registration for participation in these tutorials and workshops will be opened.

Types of presentations

• Regular papers (20 minutes + 10 minutes discussion). Regular papers should present a) results of a completed research; b) innovative research methods and their application; or c) a discussion concerning theoretical questions. An abstract should be 300-500 words long.

• Short papers (10 minutes + 5 minutes discussion). Short papers should present ideas, approaches and projects that have started only recently or are currently being prepared (e.g. grant projects, research initiatives etc.). A short paper should be audience-friendly and generate conference participants’ interest in the presented topic and/or attract potential partners for future collaboration. An abstract should be 200-400 words long.

• Posters should inform about completed research, research in progress or present new methods and/or research tools. Posters (format A0 portrait orientation) will be displayed throughout the conference at the venue site and introduced during the poster session. A poster abstract should be 200-400 words long.

• We welcome proposals for pre-conference tutorials and workshops which are to take place on Monday, 10th September 2018 (a day before the conference) in two time slots: 9-12 am and 2-5 pm. Proposals should include the workshop/tutorial title and a short description of its topic + contact information of the lecturer. An abstract should also include the information about a minimum and maximum number of participants, the type of audience (beginners, intermediate, advanced etc.), length and the type of necessary technical equipment participants should have (the organizers can provide only basic infrastructural support, e.g. suitable classrooms with a projector, whiteboard etc., not technical equipment such as laptops, specialized software etc.). The lecturer will be responsible for communicating necessary information to the registered participants. An abstract should be 200-400 long words.

Computers at EAA: submit your papers!

Submit a paper to the CAA @ EAA session, bring your data to our data clinic, or attend our computational archaeology summer school immediately after EAA!

This year the EAA (European Association of Archaeologists) Annual Meeting is taking place between 5-8 September 2018 in the lovely city of Barcelona. We have prepared an exciting set of simulation-complexity-data related events.

During the conference we will be running a standard paper session: CAA@EAA: Computational Models in Archaeology (abstract below) focusing on formal, computational models in archaeology (not exclusively simulation, but we do like our ABMs ;). The abstract deadline is 15 February. You can submit your abstract via the EAA system.

On top of that throughout the conference we will offer Data Clinic – a personalised one-to-one consultation with data and modelling specialists (summary below). In order to give us a head-start with matching archaeologists to data experts we ask participants to submit a short summary outlining their data, research questions and the ideas they may already have via the standard route of the EAA system (please note, that as an alternative format it will not count towards the paper limit imposed by the EAA).

Finally, we are very excited to announce the Summer School in Digital Archaeology which will take place immediately after the EAA, between 10-14 September 2018. A week of hands-on tutorials, seminars, team challenges and intensive learning, the Summer School will provide an in depth training in formal computational models focusing on data modelling, network science, semantic web and agent-based modelling. Thanks to the generous support of the Complex Systems Society we are able to offer a number of bursaries for the participants. For more details please see the School website; we recommend to pre-register as soon as possible (pre-registration form).

Session: #672

CAA @ EAA: Computational Models in Archaeology

Theme:
Theories and methods in archaeological sciences
Session format:
Session, made up of a combination of papers, max. 15 minutes each
 

Models are pervasive in archaeology. In addition to the high volume of empirical archaeological research, there is a strong and constant interest among archaeologists and historians in questions regarding the nature, mechanisms and particularities of social and socio-natural processes and interactions in the past. However, for the most part these models are constructed using non-formal verbal arguments and conceptual hypothesis building, which makes it difficult to test them against available data or to understand the behaviour of more complex models of past phenomena.

The aim of this session is to discuss the role of formal computational modelling in archaeological theory-building and to showcase applications of the approach. This session will showcase the slowly changing trend in our discipline towards more common use of formal methods.

We invite contributions applying computational and quantitative methods such as GIS, data analysis and management, simulation, network science, ontologies, and others to study past phenomena concerned with societal change, human-environment interactions and various aspects of past systems such as economy, cultural evolution or migration. Methodological and theoretical papers on the benefits and challenges of quantification, the epistemology of formal methods and the use of archaeological material as a proxy for social processes are also welcome.

Main organiser:

dr Iza Romanowska (Spain), dr Luce Prignano (Spain), María Coto-Sarmiento (Spain), dr Tom Brughmans (United Kingdom), Ignacio Morer (Spain)

Session: #663

Archaeological Data Clinic. Personalised consulting to get the best of your data

Theme:
Theories and methods in archaeological sciences
Session format:
Discussion session: Personalised consulting to get the best of archaeologial data. We will set up meetings with an expert in data analysis / network science / agent-based modelling.
In the ideal world we would all have enough time to learn statistics, data analysis, R, several foreign and ancient languages and to read the complete works by Foucault. In reality, most researchers artfully walk the thin line between knowing enough and bluffing. The aim of this workshop is to streamline the process by pairing archaeologists with data and computer science specialists.

  • If you have a dataset and no idea what to do with it…
  • if you think PCA/least cost paths / network analysis / agent-based modelling is the way forward for your project but you don’t know how to get started…
  • If you need a second opinion to ensure that what you’ve already done makes sense…

…then this drop-in clinic is for you.

Let us know about your case by submitting an abstract with the following information:

  • A few sentences project outline;
  • Type and amount of data;
  • Research question(s);
  • What type of analysis you’d like to perform? (if known).

We will set up a meeting with an expert in data analysis / network science / agent-based modelling. They will help you to query and wrangle your data, to analyse and visualise it and to guide you on the next steps. They may help you choose the right software or point you towards a study where similar problems have been solved. In a nutshell, they will save you a lot of time and frustration and make your research go further!

Keywords:
Computational Modelling, Statistics, Network Analysis

Dr Luce Prignano (Spain), Dr Iza Romanowska (Spain), Dr Sergi Lozano (Spain), Dr Francesca Fulminante (United Kingdom), Dr Rob Witcher (United Kingdom), Dr Tom Brughmans (United Kingdom)

CFP Journal of Historical Network Research

The Journal of Historical Network Research launched its first issue last year. Production and peer-review went fast and was very professional, and the selection of papers is of high quality (disclaimer: Matt Peeples and I published a paper in that issue, so we would say it’s of high quality of course). Anyways, I very much recommend submitting your work to this ethical open-access community run journal! There are no open-access fees and archaeological papers are very much welcomed.

More information on the journal website.

CfP for the second Issue of the Journal of Historical Network Research (JHNR)

The Journal of Historical Network Research (https://jhnr.uni.lu/) publishes outstanding and original research applying the theories and methodologies of social network analysis to historical research. The peer-reviewed journal seeks to advance the epistemological and theoretical understanding of social network analysis in the historical, social and political sciences, and promotes empirical research on historical social interactions.   The journal serves as a meeting place for the traditional hermeneutics of historical research and its concomitant emphasis on contextualisation and historical source criticism (as present in traditional academic historical journals) on the one hand, and the theory-heavy and/or sometimes overly technical discussion of methodological and technological issues (which predominates in publications focused on “pure” social network research) on the other. The journal aims to promote the interplay between different areas of historical research (in the broadest sense), social and political sciences, and different research traditions and disciplines, while strengthening the dialogue between network research and “traditional” historical research. All contents are made available free of charge to readers and authors following Open Access principles.   Submissions for the second issue of the journal   We are seeking proposals for papers to be published in the second issue of the Journal of Historical Network Research, which will appear in the autumn of 2018.   The Editorial Board welcomes proposals for papers centred on historical networks of any period of the recorded human past, from Bronze Age civilisation to contemporary history. In order to support the dissemination of the principles of reproducible research and to foster a new and transparent culture of discussion in network research in general, we encourage authors to provide their code and data sets in addition to the manuscripts for publication. We also encourage the submission of book reviews on relevant recent literature and articles, which introduce and discuss relevant and innovative digital tools for network research or interesting new databases and data sources. Articles can be submitted in English, German or French. All articles (but especially those articles written in a language other than English) should be accompanied by an English-language abstract of no more than 300 words which contains the salient points and arguments. Papers should also be indexed with no more than 5 keywords. Please follow the Author Guidelines and use the provided Word template to ensure that your paper is formatted correctly.   Articles for the second volume should be submitted via the journal homepage ( https://jhnr.uni.lu/index.php/jhnr/about/submissions) by May 1th 2018. Authors will be notified of acceptance as soon as possible. Please direct any questions you may have to the editors at JHNR-editors@historicalnetworkresearch.org   For further information on Historical Network Research in general, we would advise you to visit www.historicalnetworkresearch.org.

The editors,
Christian Rollinger, Marten Düring, Robert Gramsch-Stehfest & Martin Stark

CAA UK 2018 Edinburgh CFP

The UK chapter of CAA hosts a conference each year, a perfect opportunity for UK-based researchers to get in touch with their community of computational archaeology practitioners. It’s been a very good place to showcase archaeological network research in the past, so send in those abstracts.

CFP deadline 23 February 2018.

The organisers of CAA-UK 2018 would like to invite papers and posters for the 2018 meeting, to be held in Edinburgh, at Augustine, 41-43 George IV Bridge, EH1 1EL. On the 26th-27th October.

The use of quantitative methods and computer applications in heritage is an ever-changing discipline, with new software becoming available and new processes being created every day.

We would like to invite the submission of papers and posters related to the general topics of quantitative methods and computer applications in heritage. Topics that could be covered include:

  • Archaeogaming
  • Data management
  • Geophysics & Remote sensing
  • GIS & Geospatial Analysis
  • Integration of scientific and theoretical methods in computing
  • Photogrammetry & 3D Recording
  • Public Engagement
  • Semantic web
  • Social media
  • Simulations
  • Statistical methods
  • Visualisation & 3D modelling
  • Visualisation & Mixed Reality in Archaeology
  • Website development in the heritage sector

Please note that this list is not exhaustive and we will consider submissions on any relevant topics.

Speakers will be allocated a maximum of 20 minutes for presentations. Please send your
abstracts to the organisers at: caaukedinburgh@gmail.com

The deadline for abstract submission is Friday 23rd February 2018.

PhD funding Ancient Near Eastern networks

The below PhD funding opportunity will be of interest to archaeologists/historians with an interest in network analysis and the ancient near east.

ANEE is pleased to announce we are looking for doctoral candidates.
Application text below, link here:
<https://www.helsinki.fi/en/open-positions/doctoral-researchers-anee-1-3>

The Centre of Excellence in “Ancient Near Eastern Empires” (ANEE) at the
University of Helsinki will run from 2018-2025 and is directed by Dr.
Saana Svärd. ANEE asks: How do changing imperial dynamics impact social
group identities and lifeways over a millennium? ANEE covers the
Neo-Assyrian, Neo-Babylonian, Persian, Hellenistic, and early Roman /
Parthian Empires. ANEE engages with methodologically varied yet
integrated research on the long-term processes by which social group
identities and lifeways were negotiated. Taken together, the innovations
of ANEE are the integrated longue durée approach; and the methodological
innovativeness of each team (both separately and in collaboration).
There will be several recruitment calls for fixed term positions during
ANEE’s lifespan (doctoral students, postdoctoral researchers, and
university researchers).

ANEE is now recruiting members for three teams which investigate
identity-building processes. Each team has a methodologically specific
approach yet collaborates on four work packages.

Applications are invited for DOCTORAL RESEARCHERS (1-3) for a fixed term
of up to 4 years, starting on or before 1 September 2018 to work in the
University of Helsinki. The successful candidates’ research projects
will focus on the goals of a team or teams. The applicant should
indicate to which team she/he is applying. The selected doctoral
candidates will need to apply for acceptance in the graduate school for
either the Faculty of Arts or Faculty of Theology in March 2018. Their
main duties will consist of PhD studies and writing of a dissertation.
As ANEE is deeply multidisciplinary, competence in more than one field
and/or proof of successful scientific collaboration will be considered
an advantage.

Team 1 “Digital Humanities Approaches” develops digital humanities
approaches (especially social network analysis and language technology),
using these to supplement the more traditional Assyriological
approaches. Team 1 is looking for applicants with a solid background in
Assyriology or a related field (within the chronological scope of ANEE) and/or skills in Digital Humanities that
can be put to use in relation to ANEE’s goals. Team 1 is led by Saana
Svärd (saana.svard@helsinki.fi).

Team 2 “Social Scientific Theory & Applications” tests and refines
theoretical models from the social sciences for ancient evidence,
integrating anthropological approaches to archaeology with sociological
readings of textual and archaeological evidence. Team 2 seeks students
with backgrounds in history of the Levant and/or the social sciences,
and especially with an interest in migration, forced labor, and/or elite
identities, and/or ancient historians of the Persian Empire with similar
profiles. Willingness to collaborate with other teams and multiple work
packages is desirable. Team 2 is led by Dr. Jason Silverman
(jason.silverman@helsinki.fi).

Team 3 “Material Culture & Community Heritage” investigates the impact
of each empire on ancient local communities inhabiting the imperial
fringes and provides a sustainable future for this heritage. This it
does through an archaeological field survey program in the ancient
imperial fringe zone of southern Jordan and by developing a local
community outreach program there. Our work in Finland revolves around
promoting an understanding of Ancient Near Eastern heritage and
culture by developing a touring museum exhibition on the ancient Near
East. The team also aims to collaborate with the Finnish authorities to
further develop the policies and legislation regarding the trade in
illicit antiquities. Team 3 seeks doctoral candidates in ANE
archaeology, preferably with experience in GIS, remote sensing, and/or
satellite analysis. Team 3 is led by Dr. Antti Lahelma
(antti.lahelma@helsinki.fi), who is also the vice-director of ANEE.

For more information on the three teams and the work packages, please
see www.helsinki.fi/ancient-near-eastern-empires

An appointee to the position of doctoral researcher must hold a Master’s
degree in a relevant field, and must subsequently be accepted as a
doctoral candidate in the graduate school in the Faculty of Arts and/or
Theology. The appointee must have the ability to conduct independent
scientific research. Teaching or teaching-related tasks will form 5 % of
the position. The candidate should have excellent analytical and
methodological skills, and be able to work both independently and
collaboratively as part of a multidisciplinary scientific community. The
successful candidates are expected to have excellent skills in written
and oral English. Skills in Finnish or Swedish are not required.
Relocation costs can be negotiated and ANEE will offer help and
information for the practicalities, if needed.

ANEE is functioning in the Faculty of Arts (Teams 1 and 3) and in the
Faculty of Theology (Team 2), located in the City Centre Campus. The
city of Helsinki is the capital city of Finland, with a population of
ca. 600 000. It has been consistently ranked amongst the top cities in
the world for quality of living. Founded in 1640, the University of
Helsinki is an international academic community of 40,000 students and
staff members. It operates on four campuses in Helsinki and at 15
other locations.

The salary for the position will be based on level 2 of the demands
level chart for teaching and research personnel in the salary system of
Finnish universities. In addition, the appointee will be paid a salary
component based on personal performance. The salary is EUR 2,186-2,873
per month, depending on the appointee’s qualifications and experience.
The position will be filled with a 4 months trial period.

Applications should consist of the following English-language documents:
(1) CV including a possible list of publications (max. 3 pages)
(2) Contact information for two referees
(3) A research statement (max. 2000 words) consisting of
i) a brief description of previous experience, such as MA thesis
ii) a proposal for the PhD project that the applicant wants to conduct
in ANEE (including suggested dates for the project)
iii) a brief description of the plans for scientific cooperation
within ANEE, preferably specifying relevant team and work packages.

Further information on the position may be obtained from the team
leaders (see above) or the director Saana Svärd (saana.svard@helsinki.fi)

Please submit your application, together with the required attachments,
through the University of Helsinki Recruitment System via the link Apply
for job. Applicants who are employees of the University of Helsinki are
requested to send their application via the SAP HR portal. Deadline for
applications is 31 January 2018.

If you need assistance with the University’s electronic recruitment
system or SAP HR portal, please contact recruitment@helsinki.fi.

Apply at latest 31.01.2018

Ap­ply link:
https://rekry.helsinki.fi/sap/bc/erecruiting/posting_apply?param=cG9zdF9pbnN0X2d1aWQ9MTA2MDRCOTkyN0M4MUVFN0I5QjE2NzQ2MEM1OEY4QTcmY2FuZF90eXBlPQ%3D%3D&sap-client=300&BspClient=300&BspLanguage=EN&sap-language=EN

Special issue ARCS welcomes paper proposals

A new publication opportunity: ARCS, a multi-disciplinary journal dedicated to network research in the social sciences. I am sure they welcome contributions from archaeologists and historians. Importantly: open access without processing fees!
More info on the journal website.

Presentation

Since the 1960s, network analysis has been used in many disciplines in social science (sociology, geography, history, etc.) as well as in natural and formal science, with each discipline defining its own concepts and indicators. After the late 1990s, the circulation of concepts and indicators defined in physics, the development of new software and algorithms, and easier access to large relational datasets have changed practices and rearranged bridges and boundaries between disciplines.

Several papers have already assessed the influence of physicists on network analysis in sociology (Crossley, 2008), archaeology (Brughmans, 2013) and geography (Ducruet and Beauguitte, 2014), but there are still few studies of the circulation, or non-circulation, of network analysis methods and concepts between disciplines.

It would for example be interesting to understand why betweenness centrality has become a common indicator in the social sciences, whereas methods developed in ecology to analyze bipartite graphs are seldom used. Similarly, gravity models, which have been used in geography since the 1960s to study valued graphs, are largely ignored in sociology.

We welcome papers addressing (this is a non-limitative list):

  • the circulation, or non-circulation, of a specific concept or method between disciplines. What enabled or hindered this circulation (types of data, routine uses of software, publication formats, etc.), and which channels did it use? How did the concept or method change during its interdisciplinary journey? Reversely, can the reception of a concept or method in a different discipline have effects on the original one?
  • the genealogy of concepts and methods currently used in a specific discipline: where did they come from? How were they translated and adapted?
  • a classical text in network analysis, read from the perspective of a different discipline from that of its author.

Call for papers for a special issue of ARCSon Concepts and methods in network analysis: interdisciplinary circulation and boundaries, edited by Laurent Beauguitte (geographer, CNRS, Rouen) and Claire Lemercier (historian, CNRS, Paris)

Submission Guidelines

Authors must choose between two formats: “research paper” or “debates” (as defined here). Research papers must be based on clearly defined empirical data. Authors may use diverse types of data and methods: while this special issue explores practices in network analysis, these practices may be studied through network analysis (of citations or other types of links) as well as through other qualitative or quantitative methods. The editors have no a priori definition of “network analysis”: the aim of this special issue is precisely to emphasize the diversity of definitions across disciplines. Each author should therefore precisely state which exact methods or concepts he or she is considering.

Authors should send a one-page abstract to arcs@episciences.org

before the end of 2017

The editors will confirm whether the intended contribution fits with the special issue and the journal. The complete papers will then be peer reviewed (the process is described here; the journal is committed to getting back to the authors within three months at most) and published between June 2018 and June 2019.

References

  • Brughmans, T. (2013). Thinking Through Networks: A Review of Formal Network Methods in Archaeology. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory, 20, 623–662.
  • Crossley, N. (2008). Small-world networks, complex systems and sociology. Sociology, 42(2), 261–277.
  • Ducruet, C. & Beauguitte, L. (2014). Spatial science and network science: Review and outcomes of a complex relationship. Networks and Spatial Economics, 14(3-4), 297-316.

The Journal

ARCSis a multi-disciplinary journal dedicated to network analysis in social sciences. It publishes open access papers (without article processing charges) in English and French, under the Creative Commons BY-NC-SA license. The authors are encouraged to publish their data along with their papers; the journal can provide advice in this regard. The authors must use a Word or Latex template (available here). The journal insists on the use of gender-inclusive language and can provide advice in this regard.

Scientific Committee

Editor in chief

  • Laurent Beauguitte  Géographie (CR, UMR IDEES)

Publishing board

  • Claire Lagesse, Géomatique (UMR THÉMA)
  • Serge Lhomme, Géographie (MCF, EA Lab’Urba)
  • Marion Maisonobe, Géographie (UMR LISST)
  • Silvia Marzagalli, Histoire (PU, EA CMMC)
  • Pierre Mercklé, Sociologie (MCF, UMR CMW)

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