The Connected Past registration, PhD bursaries, and PhD school

Registration for The Connected Past conference is now open. Moreover, we will award bursaries to six excellent PhD students to attend the conference, and we announce a two-day PhD school and workshop preceding the conference.

The Connected Past conference will feature the best of archaeological and historical network research in 25 presentations and a keynote by Prof. Juan Barceló. The event will take place in-person on 29-30 September 2021 at Aarhus University (Denmark), but virtual attendance is possible (please register for virtual attendance). Registration open now.

We are also delighted to announce that bursaries to cover travel, accommodation and registration are available for six excellent PhD students attending The Connected Past conference in person. Please note that conference registration is a requirement for bursary applicants. Deadline: June 21st 2021 at 23:00 CET. Apply now! 

PhD students who plan to attend The Connected Past conference can register for free for a two-day PhD school (27-28 September 2021) awarding you 1.5 ECTS by Aarhus University. The PhD school will take place on Aarhus University’s Moesgaard Campus, but virtual participation is possible. This two-day workshop teaches you practical skills in network research for archaeologists and historians, with expert advice by practitioners. More information and registration

We hope to see many of you in lovely Aarhus!

The #TCPAarhus team

Tom Brughmans
Lieve Donnellan 
Rubina Raja 
Søren Sindbæk 

Registration: Telling stories with maps

Hestia_logo_whtTime for the third in the series of Hestia2 conferences! After great meetings in Southampton and Stanford we now move to Birmingham for ‘Telling stories with maps: the geoweb, qualitative GIS and narrative mapping’. The prgramme is included below. You can register for this meeting via eventbrite.

Telling stories with maps: the geoweb, qualitative GIS and narrative mapping
Digital Humanities Hub, University of Birmingham, 30 April 2014

Free registration is now open <http://tinyurl.com/ptdogvz> for this one-day workshop, organized as part of the HESTIA 2 initiative – a public engagement project based on the spatial reading and visualizing of texts. This workshop will examine the role of GIS as a tool for mapping texts of different kinds.

As Caquard (2013, 135) has noted, there has been considerable interest in ‘the relationship between maps and narratives’, especially in the context of the spatial turn among literary and film scholars.  In many ways this field is being driven by technological innovation, particularly the rise of easy-to-use online mapping tools developed by companies like Google to exploit location-based data; everyone can now map their story.  Nonetheless, the standard critique of GIS is that it replicates a Cartesian, positivist conception of the world through allocating geospatial coordinates to objects.  This brings the temptation to ignore a technology closely associated with domination and control, to see mapping purely as metaphor rather than geospatial ‘grid’.  Geographers, particularly those working in critical and qualitative GIS (e.g. Cope and Elwood 2009) have dissected this critique and highlight the analytical potential of GIS for those interested in qualitative data.  Just what does it mean then, to use geospatial technologies to map people’s stories?

The event runs from 10.30-16.30 (with coffee and registration from 10.00) and includes a free lunch.
Register now at Eventbrite http://tinyurl.com/ptdogvz

There are a small number of UK travel bursaries available for postgraduate students – email p.i.jones@bham.ac.uk to apply.

We have an exciting international and interdisciplinary line up of speakers, including:

Vanesa Castán Broto (UCL)
‘Mapping stories, urban energy’

Nela Milic (Goldsmiths)
‘Belgrade log BG:LOG’

Agnieszka Leszczynski (University of Birmingham) and Sarah Elwood (University of Washington)
‘Telling stories with new spatial media’

Ekaterina Yahyaoui Krivenko (NUI Galway)
‘Challenging the Narrative of International Law through GIS: limits and opportunities’

Miranda Anderson  & James Loxley (University of Edinburgh)
‘Mapping the Factual and the Counterfactual’

Pietro Liuzzo (University of Heidelberg) and Francesco Mambrini (Deutsches Archäologisches Institut)
‘Storytelling and geographical data in EAGLE’

Ian Gregory, Chris Donaldson (Lancaster University) and Patricia Murrieta-Flores (University of Chester)
‘Exploring Lake District writing using GIS’

Akiyoshi Suzuki (Nagasaki University)
‘A Good Map is Worth a Thousand Words: 3-D Topographic Narrative of Haruki Murakami’

Moacir P. de Sá Pereira (University of Chicago)
‘Robert Jordan’s nearest neighbor: A “For Whom the Bell Tolls” GIS’

Øyvind Eide (University of Passau)
‘Narratives of maps and texts. The role of media differences and stepwise formalisation’

For more information contact:
Phil Jones (p.i.jones@bham.ac.uk)
Stefan Bouzarovski (stefan.bouzarovski@manchester.ac.uk)

Registration open The Connected Past in Paris

TCPWe would like to invite you to The Connected Past conference on network analysis in archaeology and history, held 26 April in Paris (just after the Computer Applications and Quantitative methods in Archaeology conference in Paris). More info and a programme can be found below or on our website. Registration is free but since places are limited tickets will be allocated on a first-come-first-serve basis.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

The Connected Past
A satellite conference at CAA 2014, Paris

Held Saturday April 26th 2014 in Sciences Po, rooms Albert Sorel and Anatole Leroy-Beaulieu, 27 rue Saint-Guillaume, 75007 Paris (metro Saint-Germain-des-Prés or Rue du Bac). Building A on this map.

With the Support of Sciences Po, the DYREM research program, Médialab, the CAA committee, and the French network of historical network analysis.

Organisers: Claire Lemercier (CNRS, Sciences Po, Paris), Tom Brughmans (University of Southampton), The Connected Past steering committee.

The conference aims to:

  • Provide a forum for the presentation of network-based research applied to archaeological or historical questions
  • Discuss the practicalities and implications of applying network perspectives and methodologies to archaeological and historical data in particular
  • Strengthen the group of researchers interested in the potential of network approaches for archaeology and history
  • Foster cross-disciplinary dialogue and collaborative work towards integrated analytical frameworks for understanding complex networks
  • Stimulate debate about the application of network theory and analysis within archaeology and history in particular, but also more widely, and highlight the relevance of this work for the continued development of network theory in other disciplines

Read the complete call for papers

The conference will be held immediately after the CAA conference (Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology), also happening in Paris, allowing participants to easily attend both – but participants from other disciplines, especially history, are also most welcome. A “The Connected Past” practical workshop, “Introduction to network analysis for archaeologists” will also be organized during CAA2014 in Paris (see the CAA programme).

Oral presentations will be limited to 15 minutes so as to leave room for discussion. Most talk will be given in English, but some might be given in French and accompanied by English abstracts and presentations. French questions or answers will be welcome and translated during the debates. Posters will also be displayed and, in addition to specific conversations taking place during the pauses, their authors will be given 2 minutes each for a very short oral presentation.

There are no attendance fees. Although this event is free of charge, registration is required and the number of places is limited. Places will be allocated on a first-come-first-serve basis.

The Connected Past is a community led by a multi-disciplinary international steering committee. It aims to provide discussion platforms for the development of original and critical applications of network and complexity approaches to archaeology and history. To this purpose The Connected Past organises international conferences, focused seminars and practical didactic workshops.

Programme
All the presentations and posters have been confirmed, but the exact programme is still subject to minor changes
Saturday 26 April
9-9.45 Welcome coffee and introduction
9.45-11 First session: Mobility through networks
Eivind Heldaas Seland: Tracing trade routes as networks: From Palmyra to the Persian Gulf in the first three centuries CE
Henrik Gerding and Per Östborn: Network analyses of the diffusion of Hellenistic fired bricks
Marie Lezowski: Cohesion through mobility : the networks of relics in 17th-century Lombardy
11-11.15 Coffee break
11.15-12.30 Second session: Dynamics and cross-period comparisons
Habiba, Jan C. Athenstädt and Ulrik Brandes: Inferring Social Dynamics from Spatio-Temporal Network Data in the US Southwest
Ana Sofia Ribeiro: Resilience in times of Early Modern financial crises: the case study of Simon Ruiz network, 1553-1606
Marion Beetschen: Social Network Analysis as a Complementary Methodological Tool in History
12.30-13.45 Lunch break
13.45-15 Third session: Cross-cultural networks
Angus A. A. Mol and Floris W. M. Keehnen: Tying up Columbus: A historical and material culture study of the networks that resulted from the first European voyages into the Caribbean (AD 1492-1504)
Francisco Apellaniz: Cooperating in Complex Environments: Cross-cultural Trade, Commercial Networks and Notarial Culture in Alexandria (Egypt) : 1350-1500
Florencia Del Castillo and Joan Anton Barceló: Inferring the intensity of Social Network from radiocarbon dated Bronze Age archaeological contexts
15-15.15 Coffee break
15-15.50 Fourth session: Political interactions
Stanley Théry: Social network analysis between Tours notables and Louis XI (1461-1483)
Laurent Beauguitte: Models of historical networks: A methodological proposal
15.50-16.45 Final session, including a very short (2 minutes) oral presentation for each poster, discussion of the posters and final general discussion
Posters by:
Zeynep Aktüre: The Ancient Theatre Network in the Mediterranean: A Structuralist Interpretation Inspired from Fernand Braudel’s Three Planes of Historical Time
Thibault Clérice and Anthony Glaise: Network analysis and distant reading: The Cicero’s Network
Damian Koniarek, Renata Madziara and Piotr Szymański: Towards a study of the structure of the business & science social network of the 2nd Polish Republic
Susana Marcos: Familial alliances, social links et geographical network. The example of the province of Lusitania in the Roman Empire (to be confirmed)
Stefania Merlo Perring: The ChartEx Project. Reconstructing spatial relationships from medieval charters: a collaboration between Data Mining and Historical Topography
Sébastien Plutniak: Archaeology as practical mereology: an attempt to analyze a set of ceramic refits using network analysis tools
Grégoire van Havre: Interactions and network analysis of a rock art site in Morro do Chapéu, Bahia, Brazil
Beatrice Zucca Micheletto: Network analysis and gender’s studies: some issues from the Italian case (Turin, 17th-18th centuries)
16.45 Drinks and informal discussion

—- French version —–

The Connected Past
Dans le cadre du congrès CAA 2014 (informatique et méthodes quantitatives en archéologie) à Paris

Un événement organisé par le réseau “The Connected Past”

Avec le soutien de Sciences Po Paris, du programme de recherche DYREM, du Médialab, the CAA committee, et du groupe Res-Hist, Réseaux et Histoire

Samedi 26 avril 2014 à Sciences Po, amphithéâtres Albert Sorel et Anatole Leroy-Beaulieu, 27 rue Saint-Guillaume, 75007 Paris (métro Saint-Germain-des-Prés ou Rue du Bac)

Organisation : Claire Lemercier (CNRS, Sciences Po, Paris), Tom Brughmans (University of Southampton), le comité scientifique de The Connected Past

“The Connected Past” est un groupe de chercheurs doté d’un comité scientifique international et interdisciplinaire. Son objectif est d’offrir des lieux de discussion autour du développement d’applications originales des approches en termes de réseaux et de complexité en archéologie et en histoire. Pour cela, il organise depuis 2011 des colloques, séminaires et ateliers de formation.

Les objectifs de la journée sont de :

  • Proposer un lieu commun de présentation pour des recherches appliquant des approches des réseaux à des questions archéologiques ou historiques
  • Discuter les spécificités et les implications de ces approches pour ces questions et types de données particuliers
  • Contribuer à la constitution d’un groupe de chercheur.se.s intéressé.e.s par le potentiel de ces approches en archéologie et en histoire
  • Encourager le dialogue interdisciplinaire et la recherche collective dans le domaine des réseaux complexes
  • Faire vivre les débats sur l’application des théories et méthodes sur les réseaux, en histoire, archéologie, et en retour dans d’autres disciplines.

Lire l’appel à comunications complet en versions anglaise et française.
La journée de Paris se tiendra dans la foulée du congrès d’archéologie CAA, afin de permettre à ses participants d’être présents s’ils le souhaitent ; mais les propositions pour la journée émanant d’autres disciplines et notamment de l’histoire sont tout à fait bienvenues, indépendamment de toute participation au congrès CAA.

Les présentations orales seront limitées à 15 minutes, de manière à laisser un temps important aux discussions. La plupart des communications orales seront présentées en anglais, mais certaines seront en français avec des résumés et supports visuels en anglais. Il sera possible d’intervenir en français dans les discussions. Des posters seront également affichés et, en plus des discussions auxquelles ils pourront donner lieu pendant les pauses, une session sera dédiée à leur présentation orale très rapide (2 minutes) et à une discussion générale à leur sujet.

Il n’y a pas de frais d’inscription, mais, du fait de la taille des amphithéâtres, il est nécessaire de s’inscrire au préalable (en cas d’inscriptions trop nombreuses, seuls les premiers pourront entrer !).

Notez enfin deux autres événements connexes auxquels nous vous encourageons également à participer

  • Un atelier pratique “The Connected Past” dans le cadre de la CAA : introduction aux réseaux sociaux pour archéologues (en anglais), voir CAA.
  • Les 9-11 avril 2014 à Toulouse, les secondes rencontres Res-Hist sur l’analyse de réseaux en histoire, avec des invités étrangers, des présentations de recherches en cours et des ateliers pratiques de formation.

Programme
(certains détails d’organisation interne peuvent changer)
Samedi 16 avril
9h-9h45 Accueil, café, introduction

9h45-11h Première session : Réseaux et mobilités
Eivind Heldaas Seland : Tracing trade routes as networks: From Palmyra to the Persian Gulf in the first three centuries CE
Henrik Gerding et Per Östborn : Network analyses of the diffusion of Hellenistic fired bricks
Marie Lezowski : Cohesion through mobility : the networks of relics in 17th-century Lombardy
11h-11h15 Pause café
11h15-12h30 Deuxième session : Dynamique des réseaux et comparaisons entre périodes
Habiba, Jan C. Athenstädt et Ulrik Brandes : Inferring Social Dynamics from Spatio-Temporal Network Data in the US Southwest
Ana Sofia Ribeiro : Resilience in times of Early Modern financial crises: the case study of Simon Ruiz network, 1553-1606
Marion Beetschen : Social Network Analysis as a Complementary Methodological Tool in History
12h30-13h45 Pause déjeuner
13h45-15h Troisième session : Echanges inter-culturels
Angus A. A. Mol etFloris W. M. Keehnen : Tying up Columbus: A historical and material culture study of the networks that resulted from the first European voyages into the Caribbean (AD 1492-1504)
Francisco Apellaniz : Cooperating in Complex Environments: Cross-cultural Trade, Commercial Networks and Notarial Culture in Alexandria (Egypt) : 1350-1500
Florencia Del Castillo etJoan Anton Barceló : Inferring the intensity of Social Network from radiocarbon dated Bronze Age archaeological contexts
15h-15h15 Pause café
15h-15h50 Quatrième session : Interactions politiques
Stanley Théry : Social network analysis between Tours notables and Louis XI (1461-1483)
Laurent Beauguitte : Models of historical networks: A methodological proposal
15h50-16h45 Dernière session. Courtes présentations orales (2 mn) des posters, discussions des posters et discussion générale
Posters de :
Zeynep Aktüre : The Ancient Theatre Network in the Mediterranean: A Structuralist Interpretation Inspired from Fernand Braudel’s Three Planes of Historical Time
Thibault Clérice et Anthony Glaise : Network analysis and distant reading: The Cicero’s Network
Damian Koniarek, Renata Madziara et Piotr Szymański : Towards a study of the structure of the business & science social network of the 2nd Polish Republic
Susana Marcos : Familial alliances, social links et geographical network. The example of the province of Lusitania in the Roman Empire (to be confirmed)
Stefania Merlo Perring : The ChartEx Project. Reconstructing spatial relationships from medieval charters: a collaboration between Data Mining and Historical Topography
Sébastien Plutniak : Archaeology as practical mereology: an attempt to analyze a set of ceramic refits using network analysis tools
Grégoire van Havre : Interactions and network analysis of a rock art site in Morro do Chapéu, Bahia, Brazil
Beatrice Zucca Micheletto : Network analysis and gender’s studies: some issues from the Italian case (Turin, 17th-18th centuries)
16h45 Pot de clôture et discussions informelles

Digital Past 2014

digitalpasts#I just heard of a two-day conference on digital technologies for data capture, interpretation and dissemination of heritage sites and artefacts. What makes this particularly interesting I believe is that the speakers are a mix of academics, technology companies and heritage specialists. This might prove an interesting platform bringing together the ‘thinkers’ and the ‘doers’ 🙂 That’s maybe a bit of simplification, but I think it never hurts for specialists in all fields to come out of their comfort zone and be confronted with those who work towards very different ‘deliverables’.

Registration is now open. More info on the event’s website.

Registration is now open for the Digital Past 2014 conference. The cost of registration is £69 for the two days, including refreshments and lunches on both days. A conference dinner will be held at the St George’s Hotel on the evening of the 12th, bookable at an additional cost of £30.

To register for attendance, dinner or stands, please go to Eventbrite.

Places are limited, so early registration is advised. We look forward to seeing you in Llandudno!

Speakers

Keynotes:

Jonathan Purday (Europeana)

Steve Burnard (Adobe)

Douglas Cawthorne (Digital Buildings Heritage Group, de Monfort University)

Alex Hildred (The Mary Rose Trust)

Sue Wolfe (Callen-Lenz)

Matthew Epler (Kinograph)

Michael Doneus (Ludwig Boltman Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology, University of Vienna)

Session speakers:

John Edwards (Cadw): Digital technologies in site management

John McCreadie (IIC Technologies): Approaches to Digital Documentation

Richard Cuttler, Lucie Dingwall (University of Birmingham), Tobias Tonner (Coaptics Ltd): An innovative application for the management of the historic environment in Qatar

tbc (DART): The DART Project

Paul Burrows (Leica Geosystems): UAV’s, Mobile Mapping and laser scanning: cutting edge developments from Leica Geosystems

Andrew Wilson (Bangor University): Re-creating lost heritage: Automated photogrammetry on archived images

Keith Haylock (University of Aberystwyth) & Toby Driver (RCAHMW): Using X-ray Fluorescence to shed new light on the Iron Age hillforts of mid Wales

Lorner Jenner (Independent Interpretation Consultant), Julian Baum & Claire Lewis (Take 27): A virtual tour of Halkyn lead mines

Tom Duncan (Duncan McCauley Gmbh & Co): Visualising stories in a heritage site

Samantha Sportun (Manchester Museum): Virtual Object Handling

Jonathan Knox (Pixogram): Touching the Neolithic

Saskia Nijs (Layar): title tbc

Judith Winters (Internet Archaeology): Internet Archaeology: some reflections on a digital past

Adrian Hickey & Helen Jackson (Centre of Media Research, University of Ulster): A cultural approach to developing location based content

Workshops

Matt Harris (Mobile Explorer): Mobile based platforms for site interpretation

Paul Burrows (Leica Geosystems): UAV’s, Mobile Mapping and laser scanning

Nathan Jorgensen (Software Alliance Wales): WordPress for websites

Samantha Sportun (Manchester Museum): Haptics

Ben Edwards (Manchester Metropolitan University): Reusing archived images for automated photogrammetry of cultural heritage

John McCreadie (IIC Technologies): Structured Light Scanning and Structure from Motion

Marion Page (Dyfed Archaeological Trust) and Tom Pert (RCAHMW/ Peoples Collection Wales): Crowd Sourcing: the Archwilio App and Wales 1900

Registration AHCN 2013 open

Screen shot 2013-02-19 at 10.16.18Three years ago I attended the Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks satellite at NetSci. It was a great event, really multi-disciplinary. Registration is now open for the 2013 edition. It is free but tends to fill up quickly, so reserve your seat soon. The line-up looks great.

Dear all,

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN at
http://ahcn2013.eventbrite.com/ for

Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks
– 4th Leonardo satellite symposium at NetSci2013

on Tuesday, June 4, 2013 at DTU Copenhagen, Denmark.

featuring keynotes by Denny Vrandečić (Wikimedia Foundation, Germany), Paolo Ciuccarelli (DensityDesign, Italy), Scot Gresham-Lancaster (The Hub, USA), and contributions by Doron Goldfarb et al. (Austria), Emoke-Agnes Horvat et al. (Germany), Marnix van Berchum (The Netherlands), Bruno Mesz (Argentina), Santiago Ortiz (Colombia), Ruth Ahnert (UK), Thomas Lombardi (USA), and François-Joseph Lapointe (Canada). We had a new record acceptance rate of 14.5%.

Attending the symposium is free of charge, but requires registration. Tickets are given out in a first come, first serve basis, to both NetSci2013 main conference attendees as well as external guests. Please be aware that registration MAY FILL UP FAST. Please also note that we partner with an associated evening event below.

FOR THE FULL PROGRAMM and more information on our symposium, including the Book of Abstracts and an introductory video, please go to http://artshumanities.netsci2013.net

Right after our symposium at 19:00, Leonardo/OLATS and the Copenhagen Medical Museion partner to present László Barabási, François-Joseph Lapointe, Annamaria Carusi, and Jamie Allen to discuss “The Data Body on the Dissection Table”. Refreshments will be provided. Please register separately at http://medm.us/databody

PLEASE ALSO CHECK OUT OUR COMPANION WEBSITE with a collection of past abstracts, videos, links to our ongoing Special Section in Leonardo Journal, and our evolving eBook at MIT-Press at http://ahcncompanion.info/

PLEASE SPREAD THE MESSAGE!

Enthusiastic and curious to see you in Copenhagen,

The Arts, Humanities, and Complex Networks organizers,
Maximilian Schich, Roger Malina, Isabel Meirelles, and Annick Bureaud
artshumanities.netsci@gmail.com

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