CFP social network analysis Middle Ages

This event will be of interest to readers of the blog.

https://medievalsna.com/events/

CALL FOR PAPERS: IMC LEEDS 2022!

DEADLINE: 1 SEPTEMBER 2021

International Medieval Congress,

University of Leeds,

4-7 July 2022

Social Network Analysis Researchers of the Middle Ages (SNARMA) is looking for proposals for a strand entitled ‘Network Analysis for Medieval Studies’ at the International Medieval Congress at Leeds in 2022. The precise number of sessions and themes of each session will be decided based on the submissions. We would like to encourage the submissions to be as interdisciplinary as possible: the strand is very much open to those working on networks in language, literature, archaeology, etc., as well as history. We would also like to encourage submissions spanning the whole breadth of the Middle Ages chronologically. Papers may be focussed on particular case studies or on methodological questions such as the challenges proposed by fragmentary sources. We hope to present sessions which showcase a variety of different historical source types, such as charters, letters, chronicles, literary sources, and so forth. Papers should engage with either mathematical social network analysis or the theory of social network analysis.

Please email medievalSNA@gmail.com with a title and abstract up to 250 words, as well as you name, position, affiliation, and contact details, by 1 Sept. 2021

Topics may include but are not confined to:

  • Using SNA to define borders within datasets
  • Temporal, dynamic, or stochastic networks
  • Geographical networks
  • Diffusion models of disease spread
  • Diffusion models of religious beliefs
  • Data modelling with historical sources
  • Opportunities and challenges of assigning motivations to historical actors using social network theory
  • Digital prosopography and SNA
  • Advantages and disadvantages of particular software packages
  • SNA as a visualization tool
  • SNA as an heuristic tool
  • ‘Learning curve’ issues in the Humanities
  • Networks of:
    • Objects or artefacts
    • Manuscripts or texts
    • Political elites
    • Kinship and marriage
    • Trade and commerce
    • Block modelling with medieval communities
    • Religious dissent or pilgrimage/ cults of saints
    • Literary worlds; eg. Norse sagas or French chansons de  geste

NetSci/Sunbelt deadline January 24th

Submit your abstract to our session on archaeological and historical network research at NetSci/Sunbelt 2021 🙂

Deadline January 24th

Submission link: https://networks2021.net

Via the HNR newsletter:

The session “Networks and the Study of the Human Past” is part of Networks 2021: a joint Sunbelt and NetSci Conference. The conference takes place in Washington D.C. on July 6-11, 2021. The organisers are planning a hybrid in-person and remote (online) conference.

You can find the session “Networks and the Study of the Human” under number 19 in the list of organized sessions for Networks 2021. Deadline for submissions is January 24, 2021.

Networks and the study of the human past 

A growing number of studies in history and archaeology have shown that network research can constructively enhance our understanding of the human past. Moreover, it is becoming clear that archaeological and historical data sources pose interesting challenges and opportunities to social network analysis and network science. How did human social networks change over huge timescales? How can old texts and material artefacts help in answering this question? The aim of this session is to present new findings and approaches within historical and archaeological network research, and promote contacts between the various disciplines that approach past phenomena using methods derived from network analysis and network science.

This session explores the challenges and potential posed by such network studies of past phenomena, including: network modelling of past phenomena; data collection from archival evidence; incomplete and missing data; computer-assisted network extraction from texts; big data analytics and semantic network analysis based on fragmented sources; material sources as proxy evidence for social phenomena; exploration of long-term changes in past systems vs. mid-term or short-term processes; etc.

The session invites contributions from various disciplines applying the methods of formal network analysis and network science to the study of the human past. We welcome submissions concerning any period, geographical area and topic, which might include but are not limited to: migration; interpersonal relations; economy; past revolutions; covert networks of the past; industrialization; transport systems; diffusion processes; kinship; conflict and conflict solving; religion and science.

Session organizers:

Julie M. Birkholz (Ghent University & Royal Library of Belgium), Tom Brughmans (Aarhus University), Marten Düring (University of Luxembourg), Ingeborg van Vugt (University of Utrecht), Martin Stark (ILS Dortmund), David Zbíral (Masaryk University)

Jobs: 6 postdocs Social Network Analysis

Readers of this blog might be interested in these jobs (Via Humanist).

Deadline for applications 19/02/2020.

We are currently recruiting 6 Post-doctoral Research Fellows with
expertise in social research methods to work within the Trento Center
for Social Research Methods.

Computational/digital sociology and social network analysis
Two post-doctoral research fellows for researchers with experience in
computational/digital sociology and social network analysis. This
includes, among others:
·       computational methods for “statistical learning”, using R or Python,
·       design and analysis of experiments, including field and online
experiments and use of digital devices (e.g. smartphones, wearables),
·       advanced social network analysis and recent developments in
ERGM, SAOM/SIENA, multilevel and multimodal networks, large-scale networks,
·       The quantitative analysis of texts through text mining and the
use of techniques such as LDA (Latent Dirichlet Allocation), CTM
(correlated topic model) and LSA (latent semantic analysis)
·       the simulation of social phenomena with agent-based modelling (ABM).

For more details, please
see: https://www.unitn.it/ateneo/bando/61292/dipartimento-di-sociologia-e-
ricerca-sociale-avviso-di-selezione-per-il-conferimento-di-n-2-assegni

The application deadline is: 19/02/2020, 12:00 (noon), CET.

CfP:Networks and the study of the human past at the 2020 Sunbelt conference in Paris

The History and Archaeology sessions at the annual Sunbelt SNA conference are becoming a strong tradition. Submit your abstract now.

Via HNR mailing list:

CfP:Networks and the study of the human past at the 2020 Sunbelt conference in Paris

Dear All,

please consider submitting an abstract for the Paris Sunbelt 2020 session on Networks and the study of the human past.

Deadline: 31 January 2020

Organizers: Julie Birkholz (Ghent University, Belgium), Henning Hillmann (University of Mannheim, Germany), Martin Stark (ILS, Dortmund, Germany), Bernd Wurpts (University of Lucerne, Switzerland)

Session Description:

Most network research focuses on contemporary data and is presentist in orientation, overlooking the vast store of interesting data from the past. The aim of this interdisciplinary session is to further extend the community of scholars working with historical data by promoting contacts between the various disciplines that aim at making sense of past phenomena through methods and theories derived from network analysis and network science.

We are looking for papers exploring the challenges and potential posed by such network studies of past phenomena. Examples of such challenges and avenues include, but are not limited to: selective samples; missing data; big data and textual/semantic network analysis based on sources of the past.

The session invites contributions from researchers from various disciplines applying the methods of formal network analysis and network science on the human past. We welcome submissions concerning any period, geographical area or topic. The authors may be archaeologists, historians, social scientists or economists, as well as scholars from other disciplines working with historical or archaeological data. Thus, the content of the networks may include but is not limited to: past revolutions; migration; industrial revolution; diffusion processes; transitions from authoritarianism to democracy; international trade; kinship; war; religion and science.

For more information use the following link: https://www.insna.org/call-for-oral-presentations-and-posters

 

We hope to see you in Paris!

Best,

Bernd Wurpts, Ph.D.

Oberassistent

Department of Sociology

University of Lucerne

EU SNA call for sessions and workshops

What? An awesome conference full of Europeans (others also welcome) and network addicts

Where? Paris

When? June 14-17 2016

Deadline call for sessions and workshops: January 11 2016

Call for Workshops and Organized Sessions for the second European Social Networks Conference, Paris, June 14-17, 2016 (http://eusn2016.sciencesconf.org/)

Dear all,

We now invite you to submit proposals for organized sessions and workshops for the second European Social Networks Conference, which will be held in Paris from June 14 to 17, 2016 (see http://eusn2016.sciencesconf.org/). This European conference has received a regional endorsement by the INSNA.

You can propose to organize:

* A session, a set of paper presentations centered around a specific theme, for which participants can submit abstracts early March. Organized sessions consist of at least one 2-hour time slot accommodating 4-6 paper presentations.

* A workshop. Workshops are sessions of half a day (3 hrs) or a full day (2 sessions of 3 hrs) focused on teaching attendees specific methods, software or theories. These workshops are not free and require additional payment, namely 37.5 euro for half-day workshops and 75 for full-day workshops (with discounts for students).

Please send your submissions for sessions and workshops NO LATER THAN THE 11TH OF JANUARY, 2016. A call for abstracts will go out a week later. Please do NOT send abstracts for paper presentations and posters before January 19, 2016.

To submit an organized session or workshop, go to:

http://eusn2016.sciencesconf.org/resource/page/id/3

and follow the instructions.

Decisions will be communicated to the corresponding organizer(s) before January 19.

The call for abstracts, paper presentations and posters will be announced on the SOCNET list in the last week of January. Please check the website http://eusn2016.sciencesconf.org/ for updates regarding the EUSN conference. Do not hesitate to contact us at the email address below for any questions about the submission procedure.

Looking forward to seeing you in Paris next June!

The Program Committee of the EUSN 2016,
Laurent Beauguitte, Emmanuel Lazega, Christophe Prieur, Paola Tubaro
eusn2016@sciencesconf.org

CFP Sunbelt SNA session challenges in archaeological network science

sunbeltI have attended the Sunbelt Social Network Analysis conference only once, in Hamburg two years ago. But it was a brilliant experience and so different from archaeological conferences (and not just because of the traditional two evenings of unlimited open bar). The conference is attended by mainly sociologists and statisticians with a good proportion of mathematicians, computer scientists and physicists. In the last few years there have been annual historical and archaeological network science sessions. So the number of historians and archaeologists attending the event are increasing. I can definitely recommend attending Sunbelt, and of course you should present in our session 🙂

I would like to bring the session ‘Challenges in Archaeological Network Science’ to your attention. The session will be held at the Sunbelt Social Network Analysis conference in Brighton on 23-28 June 2015. We welcome all abstracts that address the challenges mentioned in the session abstract below.

The deadline for submissions is 31 March 2015. Please visit the Sunbelt website for more information and to submit an abstract: http://insna.org/sunbelt2015/?page_id=607

Please ensure to select the session ‘Challenges in Archaeological Network Science’ during the submission process. Feel free to notify us if you decide to submit an abstract.

We look forward to meeting you in Brighton,

Termeh Shafie and Tom Brughmans

ABSTRACT

Challenges in Archaeological Network Science

The application of network analysis in archaeology has only become more common in the last decade, despite a number of pioneering studies in the 1960s and 70s. The use of different techniques for the analysis and visualisation of network data has already led to new insights into past human behaviour. However, this renewed interest in network science is also accompanied by an increasing awareness of a number of methodological challenges that archaeological network scientists are faced with. These include, but are not limited to the following:

– How to deal with spurious data?

Sampling strategies in archaeology are often dominated by the geopolitical and financial constraints of excavation campaigns. Moreover, differences in the preservation of different materials provide a very fragmented picture of past human behaviour. As a result, networks constructed from archaeological data can be very sparse with apparent uncertainties.

– How to introduce more complex assumptions concerning tie dependency in the reconstruction of archaeological networks?

Network modelling is based on hypotheses from archaeological theory which in turn is based on archaeological evidence. A major challenge is how to infer the structure of an archaeological network given a set of assumptions regulating the occurrence of ties.

– How to deal with the poor chronological control of archaeological data?

The contemporaneity of observations and the exact sequence of events are often uncertain. This is problematic for network science techniques that assume node contemporaneity or require knowledge of the order of events.

– How to consider complex socio-spatial phenomena?

Archaeologists commonly study the spatial distribution of their data and evaluate to what extent spatial constraints influenced human behaviour. A limited number of spatial network techniques are currently available and many of these are not or hardly applicable in archaeology (e.g. network analysis of road networks).

This session invites papers that address these or other methodological challenges that network scientists in archaeology are faced with.

This session is organized by and will be chaired by:

Termeh Shafie, Termeh.Shafie@uni-konstanz.de, Department of Computer & Information Science, University of Konstanz.

Tom Brughmans, Tom.Brughmans@uni-konstanz.de, Department of Computer & Information Science, University of Konstanz.

SNA summer school Trier

trierGerman speakers interested in learning more about social network analysis might be interested in the Trier SNA summer school. You can sign up until 31-07-2014. More info on the website and below.

8. Trierer Summer School
on Social Network Analysis

29.09.-4.10.2014

Die „Trierer Summer School on Social Network Analysis“ findet dieses Jahr vom 29. September bis 4. Oktober 2014 (Mo.-Sa.) an der Universität Trier statt. Die Veranstaltung bietet in einem einwöchigen Intensivkurs eine umfassende Einführung in die theoretischen Konzepte, Methoden und praktischen Anwendungen der Sozialen Netzwerkanalyse. Sie besteht aus zwei aufeinander aufbauenden Modulen sowie mehreren zusätzlichen Workshops zur qualitativen und quantitativen Netzwerkanalyse. Zudem bieten die Dozenten individuelle Forschungsberatungen an.

Die 8. Trierer Summer School ist als Einsteigerkurs konzipiert. Sie richtet sich vor allem an Promovierende der geistes-, kultur- und sozialwissenschaftlichen Fächer, die sich mit der Analyse sozialer Strukturen beschäftigen und Einblick in die Methoden der Sozialen Netzwerkanalyse (SNA) nehmen möchten. Auch Studierende, die kurz vor ihrer Diplom-/Master-/Magister­arbeit stehen und methodisch mit der SNA arbeiten wollen, sind willkommen.

Anmeldeverfahren

Die Anmeldephase beginnt am Montag, 28. April und endet am Donnerstag, 31. Juli 2014.

Die Teilnehmerzahl ist auf 40 Teilnehmer begrenzt. Wenn Sie sich anmelden möchten, besuchen Sie bitte die Summer School Homepage (http://www.sna-summerschool.de). Dort finden Sie unter „Anmeldung“ ein Anmeldeformular.

Da die Teilnehmerzahl auf insgesamt 40 Teilnehmer beschränkt ist, melden Sie sich bitte rechtzeitig an.

Die Teilnahmegebühr beträgt 290,00 Euro. Sie ist 21 Tage nach Erhalt der Anmeldebestätigung fällig. Die Anmeldung wird erst wirksam, wenn die Teilnahmegebühr auf dem in der Bestätigungsmail angegebenen Konto eingegangen ist. Zusammen mit der Bestätigung des Zahlungseingangs erhalten Sie weitere Informationen bzgl. Veranstaltungsort, Übernachtungsmöglichkeiten und Busanbindung. Ebenso wird Ihnen vorbereitende Literatur zu den Lehrveranstaltungen zur Verfügung gestellt. Auf der Homepage der Summer School http://www.sna-summerschool.de können Sie sich ebenfalls informieren.

Aufbau der 8. Trierer Summer School

Modul 1: „Grundlagen der Sozialen Netzwerkanalyse“

Vom 29. bis 30. September führt das erste Modul ganztägig in die Geschichte und theoretische Konzepte sowie in Methoden der Datenerhebung, -auswertung und -visualisierung der SNA ein. Die Veranstaltung richtet sich an alle Teilnehmer, insbesondere aber an Anfänger, und bietet einen ersten Einstieg in die Thematik.

Die Lehreinheit ist als Vorlesung mit integrierten Übungen und Gruppenaufgaben strukturiert. Es werden sowohl ego-zentrierte Netzwerke als auch Gesamtnetzwerke behandelt. Unter egozentrierten Netzwerken werden Netzwerke verstanden, die sich um ein Ego (ein bestimmter Akteur/die befragte Person) positionieren. Bei der Gesamtnetzwerkanalyse steht hingegen eine ausgewählte Gruppe von Akteuren (Unternehmen, Schulklassen, Dörfer usw.) und die soziale Struktur innerhalb dieser Gruppe im Fokus.

Dozenten:

Dr. Markus Gamper, Universität zu Köln

Dr. Richard Heidler, Bergische Universität Wuppertal

Dr. Andreas Herz, Universität Hildesheim

Modul 2: „Praxisorientierte Soziale Netzwerkanalyse“

Modul 2 (01.-04. Oktober) umfasst zwei parallel laufende Angebote zur Datenerhebung und -auswertung von Sozialen Netzwerken. Am Mittwoch, 01. Oktober, erfolgt das Modul ganztägig, von Donnerstag bis Samstag jeweils nur vormittags. Je nach Forschungsinteresse können die Teilnehmer zwischen zwei Arbeitsgruppen entscheiden:

Arbeitsgruppe A – Gesamtnetzwerke (20 Plätze):

Welches übergeordnete Strukturmuster hat ein Netzwerk? Wo befinden sich Bereiche verdichteter Kommunikation? Welche Akteure sind zentral, wer sind die Broker in einem Netzwerk? Welche strukturellen und attributionalen Faktoren beeinflussen die Entstehung, Beibehaltung und Beendigung von Relationen? Diese Fragen lassen sich mit Gesamtnetzwerken untersuchen. Im Unterschied zu ego-zentrierten Netzwerken wird hier nicht nur die direkte Umgebung eines Akteurs erfasst, sondern die Gesamtheit der Beziehungen, zwischen einem abgegrenzten Set von Akteuren, wie z. B. einer Schulklasse, einem Politikfeld, einer wissenschaftlichen Disziplin, einem Dorf, usw.

Das Modul Gesamtnetzwerke legt einen Schwerpunkt auf das Einlesen und das Auswerten von Daten von Gesamtnetzwerken. Dabei wird eine Bandbreite von Software zum Einsatz kommen, wodurch ihre unterschiedlichen Stärken und Schwächen aufgezeigt werden. Typische Netzwerkformate und Verfahren der Datenmodifikation, sowie die Berechnung von Zentralitätsmaßen werden mit Pajek durchgeführt. Auch die Blockmodellanalyse wird in Pajek zum Einsatz kommen, und dann in GNU-R fortgesetzt. Die Grundlagen von R werden in einer Sitzung die gemeinsam mit dem Egomodul stattfindet gelehrt. Darüber hinaus wird R verwendet, um Syntax-basiert Auswertungen und Transformationen von Netzwerken vorzunehmen. Schließlich wird in R auch die Modellierung von Netzwerken mit ERGM, anhand einer Schulklasse von 1880/81 demonstriert. Final kommt das Programm Gephi zum Einsatz, um sich besonders mit den Fragen und Anforderungen guter visueller Darstellungen von Netzwerken zu beschäftigen. Hierzu wird ein Hochzeitsnetzwerk grafisch repräsentiert. Das Format des Moduls umfasst praktische Übungen, Diskussionen und lässt auch Raum für eigene Vorschläge.

Dozenten: Dr. Richard Heidler / Michael Kronenwett, M. A. (Kronenwett & Adolphs UG)

Arbeitsgruppe B – Ego-Netzwerke (20 Plätze):

Welche Formen sozialer Unterstützung werden von verschiedenen Beziehungen erbracht? Hat die Einbettung eines Akteurs in sein soziales Netzwerk Auswirkung auf die Generierung innovativer Ideen oder führt Mediennutzung zu Desintegration? All diese Fragen lassen sich mit Verfahren der ego-zentrierten Netzwerkanalyse untersuchen, wobei ego-zentrierte Netzwerke formal die Beziehungen eines Akteurs (Ego) zu anderen Akteuren (Alteri) dessen direkter Netzwerkumgebung sowie den Beziehungen zwischen diesen Akteuren (Alter-Alter-Relationen) darstellen.

Das Modul „ego-zentrierte Netzwerke“ führt in offene und standardisierte Erhebungs- und Auswertungsverfahren ego-zentrierter Netzwerke ein. Nach einer exemplarisch durchgeführten Fragebogenerhebung und ausführlicher Diskussion von offenen und standardisierten Erhebungsvarianten, liegt der Fokus auf der quantitativen Auswertung eines bereits vorliegenden Datensatzes mit Hilfe GNU-R. Hierzu werden Daten- und Analyseebenen sowie grundlegende Analysestrategien verdeutlicht. Daneben werden auch qualitative Verfahren vorgestellt, die dann in den Nachmittags-Workshops nochmals vertieft werden können. Für die Teilnahme sind Grundkenntnisse in statistischer Datenanalyse von Vorteil. Je nach Bedarf und TeilnehmerInneninteresse werden Analysemöglichkeiten auch für qualitative Netzwerkkarten diskutiert. Das Format des Moduls umfasst Kurzeinführungen, praktische Übungen und Diskussionen.

Dozenten: Dr. Markus Gamper / Dr. Andreas Herz

An das Modul 1 schließt sich am Dienstagabend eine Fragerunde rund um das Modul 2 „Praxisorientierte Soziale Netzwerkanalyse“an. Die Teilnehmer haben hier die Möglichkeit, den Dozenten konkrete Fragen zu den Lehrinhalten der beiden Arbeitsgruppen A und B sowie den angebotenen zusätzlichen Workshops zu stellen. Auf der Grundlage der Kenntnisse aus Modul 1 kann die Entscheidung für die Teilnahme an einer Arbeitsgruppe noch einmal überdacht und bei Bedarf, soweit organisatorisch möglich, geändert werden.

Am Samstag (4.10.) findet parallel zu den Arbeitsgruppen „Gesamtnetzwerk“ und „Ego-Netzwerke“ die folgende Veranstaltung statt:

„Governance und soziale Netzwerke“

Das interaktive Modul Governance und soziale Netzwerke beschäftigt sich mit der Analyse qualitativer und quantitativer sozialer Netzwerkdaten zur Untersuchung von Governance-Prozessen. Behandelt werden unter anderem politische Entscheidungs- bzw. Implementierungsprozesse im Europäischen Mehrebenensystem, Akteursanalysen einschließlich Macht- und Einflussverteilung in Netzwerken, strategische Netzwerkplanung, soziales Lernen und Wissensintegration.

Dozentin: Dr. Jennifer Hauck (Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung)

Keynote Speech: Network Analysis Literacy

Am Dienstag, den 30. September, hält Prof. Katharina Anna Zweig (University of Science and Technology Kaiserslautern) einen Keynote Speech mit dem Titel „Network Analysis Literacy“: Die Netzwerkanalyse bietet eine Reihe von etablierten Methoden, um beispielsweise die zentralsten Knoten zu finden, ein Netzwerk in dichte Teilbereiche zu partitionieren oder statistisch signifikante Teilgraphen zu identifizieren. Aber für jede dieser Aufgaben gibt es verschiedene Ansätze, sie zu lösen. So gibt es beispielsweise mehrere Dutzend Zentralitätsindizes. In diesem Vortrag geht es um die Frage, warum es so viele verschiedene Ansätze gibt und nach welchen Regeln man entscheiden kann, wann welcher Ansatz verwendet werden sollte. Dazu muss das „Trilemma der Analyse komplexer Netzwerke“ verstanden und gelöst werden. Anhand verschiedener Beispiele wird Prof. Zweig dessen Bedeutung darlegen und generelle Lösungansätze diskutieren.

Dozentin: Prof. Katharina Anna Zweig (University of Science and Technology Kaiserslautern)

Workshops

Workshop „Prozessgenerierte Daten und historische Netzwerkanalyse“

Die Untersuchung von Netzwerkdynamiken, d. h. der Veränderung von Netzwerkstrukturen in der Zeit, gewinnt unter Historikern und Sozialwissenschaftlern eine immer größere Bedeutung. Hierbei ist es aber oftmals nicht möglich oder praktikabel, “klassische“ Formen der sozialwissenschaftlichen Datenerhebung wie Befragungen und Beobachtungen anzuwenden. Prozessgenerierte Quellen oder Daten liegen hingegen oftmals bereits für längere Zeiträume vor und ermöglichen vielfältige dynamische Analysen. Prozessgenerierte Quellen entstehen beispielsweise während Verwaltungsvorgängen aber auch während „Oral History Interviews“. Sie sind nicht direkt durch die Forschenden für individuelle Fragestellungen erhoben worden und müssen deshalb kundig und kritisch interpretiert werden um für aussagekräftige Datenerhebungen nutzbar zu werden. Ziel des Workshops ist es, eine Einführung und praktische Handreichung in die Besonderheiten der Erhebung von dynamischen Netzwerkdaten aus prozessgenerierten Quellen zu geben.

Der Workshop gliedert sich wie folgt: Grundlagen, Quellenübung, Dateneingabe/Codierung, Datenausgabe(Einstieg in die Auswertung)/Fragen und Diskussion.

Dozenten: Dr. Martin Stark (Universität Hamburg), Dr. Marten Düring (CVCE Luxemburg)

Workshop „Mixed Methods“/“Visual Network Research“

Der Workshop ist als eine Erweiterung des im Modul 1 angeschnittenen Zweigs der „qualitativen Netzwerkanalyse“ zu sehen. Im Nachmittagsprogramm werden am 2. und 3. Oktober in zunächst zwei parallel stattfindenden Übungen die beiden Tools VennMaker und NetMap, einschließlich der kombinierten Erhebung qualitativer und quantitativer Netzwerkdaten vorgestellt. Am zweiten Nachmittag werden gemeinsam mit allen Workshop-Teilnehmern die Grundlagen und Methoden der partizipativen und qualitativen Datenanalyse besprochen und Wege aufgezeigt, wie die unterschiedlichen Formen der Netzwerkanalyse miteinander verbunden werden können.

Die Teilnehmer können zwischen den folgenden zwei Übungen wählen:

A) VennMaker

Die Software „VennMaker“ steht an der Schnittstelle von qualitativer und quantitativer Netzwerkanalyse. Sie erlaubt Netzwerke per digitalem Fragebogen oder mithilfe digitaler Netzwerkkarten zuerheben, und beide Formen lassen sich auch miteinander kombinieren. Aufgrund seines visuellen Erhebungscharakters ist der VennMaker besonders gut für partizipative Netzwerkinterviews, bzw. Formen der kommunikativen Validierung geeignet. Die erhobenen Daten können in „klassischer Weise“ mit Excel, Pajek oder R quantitativ ausgewertet werden. Die zeitgleiche Aufzeichnung der gesprochenen Kommentare während des Interviews sowie die Einbindung von Textkommentaren etc. lassen aber auch eine qualitative Auswertung zu. In Gruppenarbeit wird das Erstellen von Netzwerkkarten mit Hilfe des VennMakers erlernt. Die praktische Übung sieht die Konfiguration, Durchführung sowie Auswertung eines Interviews vor. Des Weiteren wird die Migration der Daten in Officeanwendungen und R erprobt.

Dozent: Michael Kronenwett, M. A. (Kronenwett & Adolphs UG)

B) Net-Map

Das Net-Map-Tool ist eine interview-basierte Methode, die es erlaubt, das Wissen um Netzwerkstrukturen als Netzwerkkarte direkt mit Papier und Stift sichtbar zu machen. Darüber hinaus können, während des Interviewprozesses, vielfältige Daten zu den Akteuren und qualitative Informationen erhoben werden, welche die Rollen der Akteure und Netzwerkstrukturen besser verständlich machen. Während des Workshops erarbeiten die TeilnehmerInnen, nach einer kurzen Vorstellung des Net-Map-Tools, relevante Fragestellungen aus ihrem jeweiligen Forschungsbereich und lernen die Anwendung des NetMap-Tools anhand dieser Fragen. Anschließend werden verschiedene Möglichkeiten der Digitalisierung der Netzwerkkarten aufgezeigt und erste Auswertungsschritte besprochen.

Dozentin: Dr. Jennifer Hauck (Helmholtz-Zentrum für Umweltforschung)

Forschungsberatung

Am 2. und 3. Oktober stehen die Dozenten den Teilnehmern für eine Forschungsberatung zur Verfügung. In einem persönlichen Gespräch können Lösungen für die eigenen Forschungsaufgaben und -projekte besprochen und gefunden werden. Die Teilnehmer profitieren hierbei von der Expertise und den Erfahrungen der Dozenten.

Das Angebot wurde aufgrund des großen Erfolges und der hohen Nachfrage der letzten Jahre wieder in das Programm aufgenommen. Wenn Sie das Angebot in Anspruch nehmen wollen, reichen Sie bitte bis zum 31. Juli ein Abstract (Details hierzu: siehe oben) ein.

Abschlussvortrag „Ethische Netzwerkforschung? Eine Sensibilisierungsrunde zum Abschluss“

Bei der Netzwerkforschung geht es um das Aufdecken von Beziehungen in Gruppen, die oft in hohem Maße informeller Natur und persönlich sind, wobei auch teils vertrauliche Informationen weitergegeben werden. Mit folgenden Fragen lassen sich ethische Aspekte in der Netzwerkforschung ganz gut überprüfen:

„Wer erhebt mit wessen Wissen und Zustimmung wessen Netzwerke, mit Hilfe welcher Quellen, mit welchem Ziel, zu wessen Nutzen, und mit welchen Folgen?“

Nachdem wir uns eine Woche lang gemeinsam dem `wie` und `was` der NWF nachgegangen sind, wollen wir die letzte gemeinsame Runde dazu nutzen, um Sie für das auf Netzwerktagungen bisher kaum thematisierte `warum` und `für wen` der NWA zu sensibilisieren, und mit Ihnen zu diskutieren.

Dozent: Prof. Dr. Michael Schönhuth (Universität Trier)

Rahmenprogramm

Neben dem Gastvortrag bietet das gesellige und kulturelle Rahmenprogramm der Summer School die Möglichkeit, das eigene „social networking“ zu betreiben. Beim geselligen Abend lernen sich die Teilnehmer näher kennen und bereits begonnene Gespräche können bei einem Glas Wein weiter vertieft werden. Ebenso wird die alte Römerstadt Trier mit ihren Sehenswürdigkeiten aus allen Jahrhunderten auf einer Stadtführung erkundet.

Problems with archaeological networks part 1

Plate_of_SpaghettiAs I mentioned before, I recently published a review of formal network methods in archaeology in Archaeological Review from Cambridge. I want to share the key problems I raise in this review here on my blog, because in many ways they are the outcomes of working with networks as an archaeologist the last six years. And yes, I encountered more problems than I was able to solve, which is a good thing because I do not want to be bored the next few years 🙂 In a series of four blog posts I draw on this review to introduce four groups of problems that archaeologists are faced with when using networks: method, data, space process. The full paper can be found on Academia. This first blog post in the series discusses methodological issues, enjoy 🙂

Like any other formal techniques in the archaeologist’s toolbox (e.g. GIS, radiocarbon dating, statistics), formal network techniques are methodological tools that work according to a set of known rules (the algorithms underlying them). These allow the analyst to answer certain questions (the network structural results of the algorithms), and have clear limitations (what the algorithms are not designed to answer). This means that their formal use is fundamentally limited by what they are designed to do, and that they can only be critically applied in an archaeological context when serving this particular purpose. In most cases, however, these formal network results are not the aim of one’s research; archaeologists do not use network methods just because they can. Instead one thinks through a networks perspective about the past interactions and systems one is actually interested in. This reveals an epistemological issue that all archaeological tools struggle with: there is a danger that formal networks are equated with the past networks we are trying to understand (Isaksen 2013; Knox et al. 2006; Riles 2001). In other cases, however, formal analysis is avoided altogether and concepts adopted from formal network methods are used to describe hypothetical past structures or processes (e.g. Malkin 2011). Although this sort of network thinking can lead to innovative hypotheses, it is not formal network analysis (see reviews of Malkin (2011) by Ruffini (2012) and Brughmans (2013)). However, such concepts adopted from formal network methods often have a very specific meaning to network analysts and are associated with data requirements in order to express them. Most crucially, when the concepts one uses to explain a hypothesis cannot be demonstrated through data (not even hypothetically through simulation), there is a real danger that these concepts become devalued since they are not more probable than any other hypotheses. Moreover, the interpretation of past social systems runs the risk of becoming mechanised when researchers adopt the typical interpretation of network concepts from the SNA or physics literature without validating their use with archaeological data or without modifying their interpretation to a particular archaeological research context. This criticism is addressed at the adoption of formal network concepts only. It should be clear that other theoretical concepts could well use a similar vocabulary whilst not sharing the same purpose or data requirements, in which case I would argue to refrain from using the same word to refer to different concepts or explicitly address the difference between these concepts in order to avoid confusion.

Although it is easy to claim that the rules underlying formal network techniques are known, it is less straightforward to assume that the traditional education of archaeologists allows them to decipher these algorithms. Archaeologists are not always sufficiently equipped to critique the mathematical underpinnings of network techniques, let alone to develop novel techniques tailor-made to address an archaeological question. For many archaeologists this means a real barrier or at least a very steep learning curve. Sadly, it also does not suffice to focus one’s efforts on the most common techniques or on learning graph theory. Like GIS, network analysis is not a single homogeneous method: it incorporates every formal technique that visualises or analyses the interactions between nodes (either hypothetical or observed), and it is only the particular nature of the network as a data type that holds these techniques together (Brandes et al. 2013). For this purpose it draws on graph theory, statistical and probability theory, algebraic models, but also agent-based modelling and GIS.

A thorough understanding of the technical underpinnings of particular network techniques is not an option; it is a prerequisite for a critical interpretation of the results. A good example of this is network visualisation. Many archaeologists consider the visualisation of networks as graphs a useful exploratory technique to understand the nature of their data, in particular when combined with geographical visualisations (e.g. Golitko et al. 2012). However, there are many different graph layout algorithms, and all of them are designed for a particular purpose: to communicate a certain structural feature most efficiently (Conway 2012; Freeman 2005). These days, user-friendly network analysis software is freely available and most of it includes a limited set of layouts, often not offering the option of modifying the impact of variables in the layout algorithms. Not understanding the underlying ‘graph drawing aesthetics’ or limiting one’s exploration to a single layout will result in routinized interpretations focusing on a limited set of the network’s structural features.

Archaeologists who consider the application of network methods to achieve their research aims must be able to identify and evaluate such issues. Multi-disciplinary engagement or even collaboration significantly aids this evaluation process.

References:
Brandes, U., Robins, G., McCranie, A., & Wasserman, S. (2013). What is network science? Network Science, 1(01), 1–15. doi:10.1017/nws.2013.2
Brughmans, T. (2013). Review of I. Malkin 2011. A Small Greek World. Networks in the Ancient Mediterranean. The Classical Review, 63(01), 146–148. doi:10.1017/S0009840X12002776
Conway, S. (2012). A Cautionary Note on Data Inputs and Visual Outputs in Social Network Analysis. British Journal of Management. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8551.2012.00835.x
Freeman, L. C. (2005). Graphic techniques for exploring social network data. In P. J. Carrington, J. Scott, & S. Wasserman (Eds.), Models and methods in social network analysis (Vol. 5, pp. 248–268). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. doi:10.3917/enje.005.0059
Golitko, M., Meierhoff, J., Feinman, G. M., & Williams, P. R. (2012). Complexities of collapse : the evidence of Maya obsidian as revealed by social network graphical analysis. Antiquity, 86, 507–523.
Isaksen, L. (2013). “O What A Tangled Web We Weave” – Towards a Practice That Does Not Deceive. In C. Knappett (Ed.), Network analysis in archaeology. New approaches to regional interaction (pp. 43–70). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Knox, H., Savage, M., & Harvey, P. (2006). Social networks and the study of relations: networks as method, metaphor and form. Economy and Society, 35(1), 113–140. doi:10.1080/03085140500465899
Malkin, I. (2011). A small Greek world: networks in the Ancient Mediterranean. Oxford – New York: Oxford University Press.
Riles, A. (2001). The Network inside Out. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.
Ruffini, G. (2012). Review of Malkin, I. 2011 A Small Greek World: Networks in the Ancient Mediterranean. American Historical Review, 1643–1644.

Prosopographies and social networks workshop

prosopProsopographies are great sources for building past social networks. Those interested in or working with large datasets of past individuals might be interested in the Prosop workshop. More information below. or on prosop.org

Prosop: a social networking tool for the past

Call for participants

Second database development workshop

Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL) on May 9, 2014.

Historians and other scholars with large databases of historical person data are invited to a workshop to test and populate Prosop, a project funded by the Office of Digital Humanities of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

What is Prosop?

Prosop is a collaborative semantic web database of details about individuals in the past. Although it maps networks and discovers connections, it is not just facebook for dead people. In particular, it aims to:

  • manage diverse types of data from different historical settings,
  • aggregate of large quantities of person data,
  • accommodate uncertain and conflicting information, and
  • facilitate data-driven study of historical systems of description and classification.
  • For more detailed information, visit our website at prosop.org

What kinds of data do we seek?

We’re looking for information about relatively large sets of relatively ordinary people from the past. Typically, this information is extracted from archival records used by microhistorians. For example, the database contains the name, age, address, and physical description of 700 criminal court defendants from 1880s Egypt. Prosop is meant to work for all kinds of historical person data, and we are especially interested in data in unusual formats (linguistic, topical, or otherwise) that will help us to develop the flexibility of the system. Also, we are looking for participants who are willing to share their data with the community of researchers using Prosop.

Applying with a counterpart

For this workshop, we are especially interested in applications from pairs of researchers who have similar datasets and would like to test them for possible overlap. Prosop may help them to discover common individuals and explore community characteristics.

What will happen at the workshops?

Before the workshop, each participant will submit a tranche of names, which will be imported into Prosop. Participants will describing the characteristics of their data and the ways it might interact with other person data. Those working in pairs will consider any overlap that Prosop found, as well as commonalities that it fails to discover. Participants will discuss issues of categorization and comparison that arise. We will work to find ways to link data and to make the system more usable. The workshop will provide a chance for historians and developers to communicate.

What’s in it for participants?

Workshop participants will contribute to the design of a tool that will enable new research into global social history, and will have early access to its results. They should gain new perspectives on their own data and its place in the global history of person information. Those working in pairs may discover fruitful overlap between their data sets. Participants’ experience and input will help to refine the system towards its aim, which is to encompass all categories of historical person data. Participant costs will be covered by the organizers, though some cost sharing may be asked of those applying from abroad.

How to apply?

Apply via the form available here. You will be asked to attach a CV and a letter of application, which should include a general description of the data which you wish to contribute to the project. Where possible, please specify:

  • the number of persons in the database
  • the categories of information recorded about each person (e.g. name, age, birthplace, occupation)
  • the geographical and chronological range of the persons represented
  • the type of sources from which the information is drawn (language, archives, genres).

What is the deadline for applications?

The deadline for applications for the second workshop is April 7, 2014.

Are there other ways to participate?

Prosop is an ongoing project. In addition to possible future workshops, we are looking for beta testers. If you are not able to join this workshop, but might want to be involved in the future, please get in touch via our website and join our mailing list.

Archaeology session at Sunbelt SNA conference

sunbeltThe Sunbelt series of conferences is the traditional venue for the Social Network Analysis community to showcase their new work. Last year it featured an archaeological session for the very first time, organised by Angus Mol and Ulrik Brandes. At this year’s Sunbelt there will again be an archaeological session, this time organised by Viviana Amati and Termeh Shafie. Let’s hope this will become a tradition! If you happen to be in Florida and have the time, drop by the sunbelt conference: 18-23 February in St. Pete Beach, Florida.

The line-up for this session sounds great. You can download the full schedule on the Sunbelt website. Here is the schedule for the archaeology session:

Friday 21 February, 8:40 – 10:20 AM, Blue Heron room

Emma Blake: Networks and ethnicities in early Italy

Jessica Munson: Sociopolitical networks and the transmission of ritual practices in Classic Maya society

John Roberts, Jr., Ronald Breiger, Matthew Peeples, Barbara Mills: Sampling Variability in Archaeological Network Measures

Jonathan Scholnick: Investigating cultural transmission among historic New England gravestone carvers with social network analysis

Mark Golitko: Procurement and distribution of obsidian in prehispanic Mesoamerica, 900 BC – AD 1520: an economic network analysis

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑