Hestia2 videos on Youtube

hestiaA while ago we at The Connected Past co-organised an event in Southampton called ‘Hestia2: exploring spatial networks through ancient source’. I published a review of the event on this blog before, read it here. We managed to record quite a few talks presented during this event. But this was not the only Hestia2 conference: there were four in total and most talks were recorded. You can now access all videos of the Hestia2 events on our Youtube channel. The topics of the videos are very diverse, with something on every aspect of Digital Classics represented. If you like this blog, then you WILL find something of interest in the Hestia2 Youtube channel 🙂

Click here for the Hestia2 Youtube channel.

More info on Hestia2.

Videos Hestia2 seminar online

Hestia_logo_whtLast month we organised a seminar on linked data and spatial networks in Southampton and as you know I really enjoyed it. Videos and slides of presentations of the seminar are now available on The Connected Past website. There are hours of footage and books-worth of slides on there for you to enjoy! This was only the first in a series of Hestia2 events. More info on Hestia2, future seminars and online resources can be found on our new website. Looking forward to seeing you at one of our future seminars!

The Southampton Hestia2 seminar aimed to explore the potential of innovative spatial networks and linked data techniques for research and work in the higher education, public and cultural heritage sectors. It attracted an audience with diverse backgrounds and discussions really benefited from this. The seminar is part of Hestia2, a public engagement project aimed at introducing a series of conceptual and practical innovations to the spatial reading and visualisation of texts. Following on from the AHRC-funded initiative ‘Network, Relation, Flow: Imaginations of Space in Herodotus’s Histories’ (Hestia), Hestia2 represents a deliberate shift from experimenting with geospatial analysis of a single text to making Hestia’s outcomes available to new audiences and widely applicable to other texts through a seminar series, online platform, blog and learning materials with the purpose of fostering knowledge exchange between researchers and non-academics, and generating public interest and engagement in this field.

A great Digital Humanities 2012 in Hamburg

This year’s Digital Humanities conference ended this weekend and it was a great success. The entire event was perfectly organised by the University of Hamburg. They even anticipated rain by providing DH-branded umbrellas. There was a record number of delegates, presentations were of high quality and the social events were a reflection of its host city’s image as a party capital and heimat of The Beatles. The University of Southampton was also well represented, with among others a workshop by Leif Isaksen and colleagues on modelling space and time in the humanities, a presentation on the Pelagios project, and one on Ptolemy’s Geography.

I myself did a presentation on my work with citation network analysis. I was also awarded an ADHO award bursary for young DH scholars.

By clicking on the links above you can see recordings of these presentations, but videos of many other presentations are available as well. Just have a look at the conference programme. There was alot of Twitter activity with #dh2012 and do also have a look at the DH student assistants blog. This year’s Fortier Prize went to @marcgalexander and Willard McCarty was awarded the Busa Prize.

As a first-time DH attendee I must say it is an awesome event organised by a vibrant and lovely community of friends. I would encourage everyone to attend future DH meetings.

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