Postdoc position network science Tarragona

I can strongly recommend qualifying candidates to apply for the below position. The team you’ll be working with is world-class and the research environment is inspiring.

Deadline: 31 August.

Postdoc position on Network analysis and modelling for ERC project PALEODEM

Application deadline: 31st August

JOB DESCRIPTION

This postdoc fellowship is part of the project PALEODEM, Late Glacial and Postglacial Population History and Cultural Transmission in Iberia (c.15,000-8000 cal BP) – ERC Consolidator Grant Grant 2015 Ref. 683018 (PI: Javier Fernández-López de Pablo).

PALEODEM aims to investigate the interplay between human demography and cultural transmission processes from the Late Magdalenian to the Late Mesolithic in the Iberian Peninsula, using a novel multi-scale methodological approach.

The researcher will analyse spatio-temporal networks and perform computational experiments to study on and of network dynamics. He / she will work with Dr. Sergi Lozano and the rest of COMPATHEVOL (COMplex PATHs in Human EVOLution), a highly multidisciplinary research team devoted to the quantitative study of the Human Past.

REQUIREMENTS

We seek highly motivated candidates with a PhD thesis in Network Science, who:

*   have experience in the application of network methods to empirical case studies;
*   have knowledge about analysis of spatial and temporal networks

*   have affinity with, or willingness to learn about Prehistoric Archaeology and anthropological theories;

*   have strong programming skills;
*   are proficient in English;

For more details on the position and application process: https://euraxess.ec.europa.eu/jobs/322697

Informal inquiries should be sent to slozano@iphes.cat

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PhD position multilayer network models for Humanities

The below PhD funding opportunity will be of interest to readers of this blog.

Dear friends and colleagues,

I would like to inform you that the University of Trento (Faculty of Mathematics) just published the call for one PhD position in the Program in Mathematics dedicated to the creation of multilayer network models for humanities.

This position is financed by the Fondazione Bruno Kessler (https://www.fbk.eu/en/) in cooperation with the ‘Sphere Project’ at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (https://sphaera.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de). Primary workplace is Trento, Italy, and secondary (some months a year) is Berlin, Germany. The required language is English.

If you look for those positions founded by the Fondazione Bruno Kessler, the call is the one numbered D here:

https://www.unitn.it/en/ateneo/1956/announcement-of-selection

The PhD is primarily supervised by Manlio de Domenico, Head of the “Complex Multilayer Network (CoMuNe)” research unit at the “Center for Information Technology” of the Fondazione Bruno Kessler

https://comunelab.fbk.eu/manlio/index.php

I would very much appreciate you spreading the news in the faculties of mathematics, computer science and similar and, please, do not hesitate to contact Manlio or me for further information.

Sincerely,

Matteo Valleriani & Manlio de Domenico

*********************************************

Prof. Dr. Matteo Valleriani

– Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

– Technische Universität, Berlin

– University of Tel Aviv, Israel

The Connected Past Oxford 2018: registration open now

Registration for The Connected Past Oxford 2018 is open now.
A two-day international inter-disciplinary conference featuring 46 talks about network research on a wide variety of topics including Archaeology, Physics, History and Computer Science.
When? 6-7 December 2018
Where? University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Keynotes? Dr. Nathalie Riche (Microsoft Research) and Dr. Matthew Peeples (Arizona State University)
How do social networks evolve over huge time-scales? How did geography constrain or enhance the development of past social networks? These are fundamental questions in both the study of the human past and network research, yet our ability to answer them is severely hampered by the limited development of spatiotemporal network methods. PastNet is an inter-disciplinary network that aims to stimulate the development and application of such methods through networking meetings, a conference and a workshop.
Formal network methods are increasingly commonly applied in a wide range of disciplines to study phenomena as diverse as the connectivity of neurons in the human brain, terrorist networks, a billion interlinked Facebook profiles, and power grids. Despite this diversity and the decades-long tradition of using network methods in the social sciences, physics and computer science, the development of techniques for the study of spatial networks and long-term network change has so far been largely neglected. Network research is also becoming more common in disciplines concerned with the study of past human behaviour: archaeology, classics and history. These disciplines have a strong tradition in exploring long-term human behavioural change and spatial phenomena, despite being forced to use fragmentary textual and material sources as indirect evidence of such phenomena.
By bringing together network researchers from archaeology, classics, computer science, digital humanities, history, mathematics, network science, oriental studies, physics, psychology, and sociology, The Connected Past 2018 conference in Oxford aims to foster cross-disciplinary exchange to push network research further. The historical disciplines will contribute new spatiotemporal approaches and datasets to network research, whereas the traditional network research disciplines will further stimulate the critical application of network approaches to the study of the human past.
This event is made possible thanks to the generous support of The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH) and is organised by the TORCH research network PastNet: https://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/themes/pastnet-network
Presentations will be delivered on the topic of spatial and temporal network approaches, addressing the challenges posed by the use of or apply network approaches in historical/archaeological research contexts, with case studies drawn from all periods and places. Topics might include, but are not limited to:
  • Spatial networks
  • Temporal networks
  • Archaeological network research
  • Historical network research
  • Missing and incomplete data in archaeological and historical networks
  • What kinds of data can archaeologists and historians use to reconstruct past networks and what kinds of issues ensue?
  • Formal network analysis vs qualitative network approaches: pros, cons, potential, limitations
Hope to see you all there!

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